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Decommissioning Legacy EHR systems with Data Archival – Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series

Posted on August 25, 2016 I Written By

EMR Data Archival

In their latest infographic (Check out the full infographic, Galen Healthcare Solutions provides critical information and statistics surrounding EMR data archival including:

  • Healthcare Data Growth
  • Healthcare Data Archival Drivers
    • Mergers & Acquisitions
    • Legacy System Retention Requirements
  • Healthcare Data Archival Benefits
  • Average Patient Digital Footprint
  • Industry Leading Archival Solution

Healthcare Information Technology leaders face challenges in keeping pace with new initiatives and consequently, managing a growing collection of legacy systems. With drivers including mergers & acquisitions, vendor consolidation, application dissatisfaction and product sunsets, it’s estimated that 50% of health systems are projected to be on second-generation technology by 2020, according to the IDC. As these new systems are implemented, multiple legacy systems are left behind, requiring healthcare IT staff to provide support and maintain access.

The strategy of keeping a patchwork of legacy systems running in order to maintain access to data is risky, resource intensive and can be quite costly given licensing, support, and maintenance needs. Decommissioning legacy systems with a proven archival system reduces cost and labor, minimizes risk, ensures compliance, simplifies access and consolidates data.

  • Reduce Costs: Streamlining the long-term storage of historical PHI now will save money in the long-run. Not only will it reduce costs paid for the support and technical maintenance of the legacy system, but it will also save on training new staff on the new system over the next 7-25 years. In addition, incorporating data archival efforts with a discrete data migration provides significant economies of scale.
  • Minimize Risk: Preserving historical patient data is the responsibility of every provider. As servers and operating systems age, they become more prone to data corruption or loss. The archiving of patient data to a simplified and more stable storage solution ensures long-term access to the right information when it’s needed for an audit or legal inquiry. Incorporating a data archive avoids the costly and cumbersome task of a full data conversion.
  • Ensure Compliance: Providers are required to retain data for nearly a decade or more past the date of service. In addition, the costs of producing record for e-Discovery range from $5K to $30K/ GB (Source: Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology). Check with your legal counsel, HIM Director, medical society or AHIMA on medical record retention requirements that affect the facility type or practice specialty in your state.
  • Simplify Access: We all want data at the touch of a button. Gone are the days of storing historical patient printouts in a binder or inactive medical charts in a basement or storage unit. By scanning and archiving medical documents, data, and images, the information becomes immediately accessible to those who need it.
  • Consolidate Data: Decades worth of data from disparate legacy software applications is archived for immediate access via any browser-based workstation or device. Also, medical document scanning and archiving provides access to patient paper charts.

Because the decision to decommission can impact many people and departments, organizations require a well-documented plan and associated technology to ensure data integrity.

Download the full archival whitepaper to understand the drivers that impact archival scope specific to both the industry and your organization.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement and data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell

About Galen Healthcare Solutions
Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

EHR Data Migration – Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series

Posted on August 10, 2016 I Written By

EHR Data Migration
(See Full EHR Data Migration Infographic)

In this infographic, Galen Healthcare Solutions provides critical information and statistics pertaining to EHR data migration including:

  • Healthcare Data Growth
  • EHR Data Migration Drivers
    • Mergers & Acquisitions
    • System Consolidation
  • EHR Data Migration Challenges
  • Industry Leading EHR Migration Solution

The demand for data migration within the U.S. healthcare market is growing exponentially. The increase in mergers and acquisitions is driving system consolidation as is the increasing number of HCOs seeking EHR replacements to address usability and productivity concerns. A recent survey by Black Book Rankings found that nearly one-fifth of large practices and clinics intend to undergo an EHR replacement by the end of 2016. In addition, a 2015 Kalaroma report shows that the EHR replacement market will grow at an annual rate of 7-8% over the next five years.

EHR Data Migration Process

The process of migrating from one EHR to another is among the most difficult technical and functional projects a healthcare organization will ever confront. The EHR transition requires vendor selection, assessment and scoping, legacy system optimization, data migration, legacy application support, data archival, and new system implementation. If organizations fail to address any of these components properly, their migration could leave healthcare providers without the information needed to make the best patient care decisions, and organizations without easy access to the historical data necessary for participating in quality reporting initiatives and other current and emerging value based care reimbursement methodologies.

Learn more about EHR transition, replacement and migration strategies, methodologies, tips & tricks, and best practices by downloading our EHR Migration Whitepaper.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement and data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell

About Galen Healthcare Solutions

Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and proud sponsor of the Tackling EHR & EMR Transition Series. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Population Health Management: Lessons Learned

Posted on August 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Population Health Management Lessons Learned

I’m always on the lookout for best practices and insights that will help readers. This slide from the #HFSummit was a great look into insights into population health management. In some ways population health management is an old area, but with technology and new data sets it is also a very quickly evolving area. In case you can’t see the picture above, here are the lessons learned from population health management:

  • Segment high-risk populations
  • Harness advanced analytics
  • Use patient registries and medical homes
  • “No outcome, no income”
  • Go upstream
  • Eat your own cooking
  • Focus on the whole population
  • Meet people in their lives
  • Emphasize wellness and prevention
  • Think outside the box
  • Leverage technology
  • Partner, partner, partner

I think many of these are obvious and generic. However, a few of them are likely foreign to many healthcare organizations. As you look through the list, don’t compare yourself to other organizations. Instead, focus on where you’re at and where you want to be. We have too much comparing in hospitals and health systems and not enough leaders that are working to be the best they can be. We all don’t have to reinvent the wheel, but we also shouldn’t just follow like minions with no thought as to where we’re going.

The Rise of the “EHR Value” Equation at Hospitals

Posted on July 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve heard a lot of people talk about how it will be impossible for ambulatory EHR vendors like athenahealth and eCW to break into the acute care market. For those following along at home, both companies have announced that they’re building out their EHR software for the acute care market. These are big bets by both companies, but I think many people don’t realize the advantage these companies will have going into the very expensive hospital EHR market.

Companies like eCW and athenahealth will be able to come into a hospital with a native cloud platform that will let them offer some really aggressive pricing. When you’re paying $50+ million for an EHR (or $9+ billion for some), there’s a lot of wiggle room for a new entrant to enter the fray at a much lower cost point. That lower cost point will totally change the EHR value equation for hospitals. In fact, these cloud based hospital EHR will likely be able to compete effectively against a legacy EHRs upgrade costs alone.

Don’t believe this is possible? Take a look at the story about Delta Regional Hospital returning to MEDITECH. Why did they do it? Thomas Moore, vice president and CFO at Delta said, “We were looking for a system with a lower cost of ownership without sacrificing quality.” Moore later added this comment, “MEDITECH is a company that truly understands the meaning of value.”

During the wild west phase of EHR where the industry was propped up by $36 billion in stimulus money, everyone had the perfect rationale for spending hundreds of millions (and even billions) on EHR software. As we return to a more rational market we’re going to see hospital CIOs starting to place a much larger emphasis on EHR value. Showing that value is going to be hard for some of the larger EHR vendors who’ve charged hundreds of millions and even billions of dollars to their customers. Plus, it will be hard for them to lower their price.

In one online thread I participate on, a bunch of people were bashing Delta Regional Hospital’s decision to go back to MEDITECH. However, a former CIO offered this great insight:

Ya gotta spend time in a Meditech shop. It’s not flashy, but from a value perspective (and it does a lot more than just EHR), it’s hard to beat.

The same is going to be true with acute care EHR from eCW and athenahealth, but they’ll have some of the sexy factor as well. In the acute care EHR world I believe we’re just entering the new world of EHR value. Those who can tell the story of the value they’ve created for customers are going to win. Plus, we’re going to see a fierce battle from new entrants who are going to try and undercut the market. Think about how the EHR value equation changes when you can charge even $75 million instead of $100 million. That’s a game changer.

5 Challenges for Healthcare That Won’t Go Away

Posted on May 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There are some challenges in healthcare that will likely be with us forever. As soon as we think we have our arms around it, it grows or changes. It’s the nature of life and we have to constantly deal with these challenges as healthcare leaders. In a whitepaper titled “Healthcare Ops Management: 5 Trends You Can’t Ignore In 2016” 5 of these challenges are highlighted:
5 Healthcare Challenges
You can download the full whitepaper for free if you want to dive into more detail on each of these 5 challenges. However, it struck me that these 5 challenges are healthcare challenges that likely won’t go away:

  • Patients are Consumers
  • Patient Safety
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Data-Rich Environment
  • Emphasis on Cost Reduction

Think about the list above. Will patients become less consumers? Will patient safety ever become less of a concern? Disasters are only picking up, so will we ever not need to prepared for emergencies? Can anyone imagine healthcare having less data? Would a leader ever say to not worry about cost reduction?

All of these challenges (and likely others) are things that healthcare leaders are going to have to deal with going forward. I wonder how many healthcare CIOs have a plan for how they’re going to prepare their organization for each of these challenges on an ongoing basis. I’m sure many have some point projects, but likely lack an overall vision for each of these areas. A plan for each of these 5 challenges would be a great place to start.

Health IT Software Must Be Meaningful and Pleasurable

Posted on April 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most dynamic healthcare CIO’s is Shafiq Rab, MD, MPH, Vice President and CIO at Hackensack UMC. Healthcare Scene was lucky enough to talk with him at the DataMotion Health booth during HIMSS 2016. Dr. Rab talked with us about Hackensack UMC’s approach to healthcare IT innovation. He offered some great insights into how to approach any healthcare IT project, about Hackensack University Medical Center’s “selfie” app, and their efforts to use Direct and FHIR to empower the patient.

I love that Dr. Rab leads off the discussion with the idea that healthcare IT software that they implement must be meaningful and pleasurable. Far too many health IT software miss these important goals. They aren’t very meaningful and they’re definitely not pleasurable.

Dr. Rab’s focus on the patient is also worth highlighting. Health IT would be in a much better place if there was a great focus on the patient along with making health IT software meaningful and pleasurable. Thanks Dr. Rab and DataMotion Health for doing this interview with us.

Accessing Near Real Time Patient Data In & Out of the Hospital with Alan Portela

Posted on April 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Scene recently sad down with Alan Portela, CEO of AirStrip to talk about the shifting world of real time access to healthcare data in and out of the hospital. We cover a lot of ground including AirStrip’s experience being on stage at the announcement of the Apple Watch, the challenge of EHR data interoperability, and the amazing work that AirStrip is doing to make near real time health data available on devices across healthcare. Enjoy the recorded video interview with Alan Portela below:

In the “after party” discussion, we continue the discussion and are joined by Jimmie Legan, MD and Charles Webster, MD.

NYC Epic Rollout Faces Patient Safety Questions

Posted on March 30, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

In the summer of last year, we laid out for you the story of how a municipal hospital system’s Epic EMR installation had gone dramatically south since its inception. We told you how the New York City-based Health and Hospitals Corp. was struggling to cope with problems arising from its attempt to implement Epic at its 11 hospitals, four long-term care facilities, six diagnostic treatment centers and more than 70 community-based clinics.

At the time of last writing, the project budget had exploded upward from $302 million to $764 million, and the public chain’s CTO, CIO, CIO interim deputy and project head of training had been given the axe. In the unlikely event that you thought things would settle down at that point, we bring you news of further strife and bloodshed.

Apparently, a senior clinical information officer with the chain’s Elmhurst and Queens Hospital Centers has now made allegations that the way the Epic install was proceeding might pose danger to patients. A New York Post article reports that in a letter to colleagues, outgoing HHC official Charles Perry, M.D. compared the EMR implementation process to the 1986 Challenger space shuttle disaster.

In his letter, Dr. Perry apparently argued that the project must be delayed. According to the Post, he quoted from a presidential panel report on the disaster: “[For] a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.” Another Post article cited anonymous “insider” sources claiming that the system will crash, as the implementation is being rushed, and that the situation could lead to patient harm.

For its part, HHC has minimized the issue. A spokesperson told FierceHealthIT that Perry was associate executive director of the Elmhurst hospital and liason to the Queens Epic project, rather than being CMIO as identified by the Post. (Further intrigue?) Also, the spokesperson told FHIT that “if a patient safety issue is identified, the project will stop until it is addressed.”

Of course, the only people who truly know what’s happening with the HHC Epic implementation are not willing to go public with their allegations, so I’d argue that were obligated to take Perry’s statements with at least a grain of salt. In fact, I’d suggest that most large commercial Epic installations (and other large EHR implementations for that matter) got the scrutiny this public hospital system gets, they’d probably look pretty bad too.

On the other hand, it’s fair to say that HHC seems to crammed enough scandal into the first few years of its Epic rollout for the entire 15-year project. For the sake of the millions of people HHC serves, let’s hope that either there is not much to these critiques — or that HHC slows down enough to do the project justice.

Quick Hitting Thoughts on CDS (Clinical Decision Support)

Posted on March 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m finally starting to go through all my notes from HIMSS. Part of that is because I’ve been busy after HIMSS. Part of it is because I like to recover from what I call the #HIMSSHaze. Part of it is that I like to see what still resonates a few weeks after HIMSS.

With that in mind, I was struck by a number of quick hitting comments that I noted from my interview with Dr. Peter Edelstein, CMO at Elsevier. Dr. Edelstein is a fascinating guy that I’ll have to have on a future Healthcare Scene interview. In the meantime, here are some of the quick hitting thoughts he shared about CDS (Clinical Decision Support).

One key point he made is that it seemed like many organizations didn’t have a strategy for CDS. He also aptly pointed out that the same seemed to apply to big data. I agree with him wholeheartedly. If we were to go to a healthcare organization and ask them their CDS strategy I don’t think most of them would have an answer. I think if we dug in, we’d probably find that most of them have essentially deferred their CDS strategy to their EHR vendor. Does anyone else feel like this is a problem?

When I asked Dr. Edelstein what would be his suggested strategy on adopting CDS, he suggested that he’d want to make sure that the CDS solution worked across all provider types. Next he compared the pull CDS solutions (Reference resources, etc) to wearing seat belts in a car and the push CDS solutions (Order sets, care plans, etc) to an airbag in a car. While we certainly need both sets of solutions, he suggested that we should make more of an effort to get the push CDS solutions implemented in healthcare.

I thought the analogy was a great way to look at the various types of CDS solutions. Plus, I agree that we need more push solutions in healthcare. The pull solutions are necessary for some of the most challenging problems, but we all know that when a doctor is busily going about their day they often choose not to check with the pull solutions when they should. The push solutions can be integrated into their workflow so that providers can more easily address any potential issues from within the flow of their day.

Dr. Eldestein also pointed out that Wikipedia is still the most commonly used reference resource despite many studies which have illustrated the medical errors that exist on it. Why do they use it? It’s because it’s simple to use and easily accessible. This is a great illustration of why we need the right CDS information to be more easily available to the doctor at the point of care at the moment they need it.

Definitely some great insights into CDS. What’s great about CDS is that at this point pretty much everyone is using some form of CDS. We’re also seeing CDS integrated more deeply into EHR software. I expect this trend will continue and will become much more sophisticated.

It does beg the question, what’s your healthcare organization’s CDS strategy?

Health IT Workflow Stories at #HIMSS16

Posted on February 26, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’re not familiar with Charles Webster, MD (Better known as @wareflo on Twitter), then you probably don’t know that he has a total and absolute obsession with workflow and specifically workflow technologies. Each year for a number of years, the Workflow King (that’s his other nickname) has gone through the list of HIMSS annual conference exhibitors (~1300 this year) and evaluated how many of them were using workflow engines or workflow automation in their healthcare IT software.

With this background, I thought Chuck would be the perfect guest on a recent Healthcare Scene interview to talk about the evolution of healthcare IT workflow at HIMSS and some of the various companies at HIMSS 2016 that people should visit to see these technologies in action. Along with talking with Chuck, we were joined by a number of healthcare IT vendors that have workflow technologies that will be attending and exhibiting at HIMSS. Enjoy our discussion and a preview of workflow technologies at HIMSS 2016: