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CXO Scene Episode 3: EHR Cloud Hosting, the EMR Market, and Health IT Staffing Challenges

Posted on August 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed the live taping of the third CXO Scene podcast with David Chou, Vice President and Chief Information and Digital Officer at Children’s Mercy Kansas City and John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com, the video recording is now available below.

Here were the 3 topics we discussed on the 2nd CXO Scene podcast along with some reference links for the topics:
* Cloud hosting
http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/uc-san-diego-health-pushes-ehrs-to-cloud-uc-irvine-slated-for-november

* Future of the EMR market with McKesson acquisition
http://www.mckesson.com/about-mckesson/newsroom/press-releases/2017/allscripts-to-acquire-mckessons-enterprise-information-solutions-business/
http://www.hospitalemrandehr.com/2017/08/18/is-allscripts-an-also-ran-in-the-hospital-emr-business/

* IT staffing challenges

You can watch the full CXO Scene video podcast on the Healthcare Scene YouTube Channel or in the video embed below:

Note: We’re still working on distributing CXO Scene on your favorite podcasting platform. We’ll update this post once we finally have those podcast options in place.

Take a look back at past CXO Scene podcasts and posts and join us for the live recording of future CXO Scene podcasts.

CXO Scene Episode 2: EMR As a Commodity, Shadow IT, Health IT Training, and Printer Security

Posted on July 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed the live taping of the second CXO Scene podcast with David Chou, Vice President and Chief Information and Digital Officer at Children’s Mercy Kansas City and John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com, the video recording is now available below.

Here were the 4 topics we discussed on the 2nd CXO Scene podcast:
* Did Meaningful Use Turn EMRs Into a Commodity?

* Shadow IT – How should healthcare leaders deal with Shadow IT?

* The EHR Dress Rehearsal – Should this be a best practice for every health IT implementation?

* Printer Security – Where do printers and print devices rank on security risks for an organization?

You can watch the full CXO Scene video podcast on the Healthcare Scene YouTube Channel already:

Note: We’re still working on distributing CXO Scene on your favorite podcasting platform. We’ll update this post once we finally have those podcast options in place.

Take a look back at past CXO Scene podcasts and posts and join us for the live recording of future CXO Scene podcasts.

New Healthcare CXO Scene Podcast

Posted on July 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We recently did the inaugural recording of our new bi-weekly Healthcare CXO Scene podcast where David Chou, Vice President and Chief Information and Digital Officer at Children’s Mercy Kansas City and John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com sit down to talk about the latest happenings in Healthcare IT. We expect CXO Scene to be a lively, but practical look at the topics that matter most to Healthcare CXOs.

Here were our 3 topics for the inaugural CXO Scene podcast:
* Petya – Ransomware and HIT Security are keeping us all up at night
* MACRA – A look at the new proposed rule
* Organizational Blindness – Not becoming desensitized to your organization’s weaknesses

You can watch the full CXO Scene video podcast on the Healthcare Scene YouTube Channel already:

Note: We’re still working on distributing CXO Scene on your favorite podcasting platform. We’ll update this post once we finally have those podcast options in place.

Resources from CXO Scene #1:
http://www.emrandhipaa.com/emr-and-hipaa/2017/07/03/the-petya-global-malware-incident-hitting-nuance-merck-and-many-others/
http://www.hospitalemrandehr.com/2017/07/03/wannacry-will-make-a-cio-cry/
http://www.emrandehr.com/2017/06/26/2018-qpp-proposed-rule-what-it-means-for-mips-quantifying-the-impact-on-specialty-practices-macra-monday/
http://www.hospitalemrandehr.com/2017/06/26/are-you-desensitized-to-whats-happening-in-your-organization/

We’ll be holding the 2nd CXO Scene podcast on July 20th at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT). You can watch the CXO Scene #2 live stream recording on YouTube where you can also chime in during the recording with your own comments and questions. Plus, we welcome your feedback on how we can make CXO Scene more valuable to you or if there are any topics you’d really like us to cover. Just let us know on our Contact Us page.

If you’d like to receive future health care CXO Scene content in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene content here.

WannaCry Will Make a CIO Cry

Posted on July 3, 2017 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

If you like CXO scene, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here or read through the CXO Scene archive. Also, join us for the live recording of our first ever CXO Scene podcast on Thursday, 7/6/17 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) where we’ll be talking Petya, MACRA, and Organizational Blindness.

As continuous research is done to create better defenses against malicious computer attacks, cybercriminals have also come up with more ways to get cash into their pockets as quickly as possible.  In the past years, a new breed of computer virus has started infecting computers and mobile devices. These viruses are unlike the previous malware as they lock down the computer including the precious files in it and only unlocks it when the user has paid the demanded amount. WananCry, Cryptolocker, Cryptowall, and TeslaCrypt are the new computer viruses that belong to a family of infections known as ransomware.

Cryptolocker is the earliest version of ransomware that started infecting computers in 2013. It easily infects computers through phishing links usually found in email attachments and through computer downloads.  Once a computer has been infected with ransomware, all the computer files are held as ‘hostage’ of the cybercriminals. In some cases, ads of pornographic websites appear on the screen each time a user clicks. These cybercriminals demand payment in order to unlock the files and restore the computer to its previous state.  As an added pressure, these criminals threaten users to delete all files if certain demands are not met within a specified period (usually within 24 hours). The desperate user usually doesn’t have any choice but to give in.

Ransomware Threat in Hospitals

Threats from ransomware has been widespread and it has affected computers of hospitals. In a Reuters report, it stated that a study from Health Information Trust Alliance on 30 mid-sized U.S. hospitals revealed that over half of these establishments (52%) were infected with the malicious software.  Recently we are starting to see countries get shutdown due these attacks while a global voice dictation vendor was shut down and this interfered with the doctor’s ability to voice dictate their notes.

How Companies Can Prevent Ransomware Attacks

Ransomware attacks are serious threats in healthcare. When computers in hospitals stop functioning, there will be delay in information access and flow and may compromise the safety of the patients. When there is ransomware attack, caregivers will have no access to patients’ data which can be crucial for those who are unconscious. It can also result in delayed or undelivered lab requests and prescriptions. And since there are medical devices that rely on computers to be operated, they can be inoperable all throughout the period the computer is held ‘hostage.’

With more medical facilities relying heavily on technology for its operation, it’s crucial to keep the computers malware-free. The following are some tips on how you can prevent these ransomware attacks:

  • Back up your data
    One of the best things companies can do to protect themselves from ransomware is to regularly do backups. Regularly backing up your files can give you a peace of mind even if a malicious attack happens. Since ransomware can also encrypt files on mapped drives, it’s important to have a backup regimen on external drives or backup services that are not assigned a drive letter. The one key element that is missing during the backup process is testing the backup to make sure that it is working. Do not miss the testing step.
  • Make file extensions visible
    In many cases, ransomware arrives as a file with a .PDF.EXE extension. By adjusting the settings to make these file extensions visible, you can easily spot these suspicious files. It also helps to filter email files with .EXE extension. Instead of exchanging executable files, you may opt for zip files instead.
  • Take advantage of a ransomware prevention kit
    The rise of ransomware and its threats have paved way for cybersecurity companies to come up with ransomware prevention kits. These kits protect the computer by disabling files that are run from the App Data, Local App Data folders, and executable files run from Temp directory.
  • Disable the RDP
    The RDP or Remote Desktop Protocol is a Windows utility that enables others to access your desktop remotely. If there is no practical use of RDP in your daily operations, then it’s best to disable it as it’s often used by ransomware to access targeted machines.
  • Update your software regularly
    Running outdated software makes your computer more vulnerable to ransomware attacks. So, make sure to regularly update your software.
  • Install a reliable anti-malware software and firewall
    This is applicable to malware in general. Having both the anti-malware software and firewall creates a double-wall protection against these malicious attacks. If some gets past the software, the firewall serves as the second level of protection from the malware.
  • When ransomware attack is suspected, disconnect immediately from the network
    While this isn’t a foolproof solution, disconnecting immediately from the network or unplugging from the WiFi as soon as ransomware file is suspected can reduce the damage caused by the malware. It may take some time to recover some files but doing this can sometimes cut back the damage.

Ransomware poses a serious threat not just to the security of hospital files but as well to the patients’ safety. Hence, companies, especially healthcare facilities, must not take this malware issue lightly.  Your biggest security risk exposure is internal so make the effort to educate your internal workforce as a priority as well.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Cloud – Biggest Health IT Myths

Posted on June 7, 2017 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

If you like CXO scene, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here or read through the CXO Scene archive.

So many companies are now embracing the reduced costs and agility that come with moving their data to the cloud. However, there are still so many contradictory opinions regarding which is a safer way of storing company data – on-premise storage or cloud storage? In view of this, we are going to start by dispelling the biggest IT myths that are making their rounds on the internet.

By moving your data to the cloud, you will have zero control over your technology

The fact is that by moving your data to the cloud, you can meaningfully reduce the pains and resources spent to continually upgrade software and maintain hardware. Your IT personnel can now focus on the primary business by improving operations instead of focusing on ‘Mr. Fix it’ services. Instead of a company spending a bigger chunk of its budget on expensive servers for workload and email storage, adopting the cloud can help them focus on their business strategy and support their core business in a more flexible and dynamic fashion that allows for quick responses to situations.

Storing data on premise is way safer than cloud storage

Security is principal for any business. A security breach could not only sell your trading secrets to your competitors, but it could potentially bring down your entire site and cause you to lose a lot of revenue and customer trust. It’s therefore a no brainer that the security of your business is one of the greatest concerns, especially when considering cloud storage.

With technology evolving every passing day, security has transformed into a full-time job that requires a full team of security professionals who often command handsome salaries that many businesses can’t afford. By working with a reputable cloud-based company, you get to gain first class access to one of the best security any money can buy for your business.

Cloud storage offers security against both digital and physical attacks. Additionally, most of today’s tech providers have moved to the cloud meaning we are going to see more and more innovations happening in the cloud, and you don’t want your business left out.

One thing that most people who are so against the cloud don’t consider is the fact people are the greatest security weakness of all. Every security breach is instigated by a person, and the good thing about the cloud is that it uses the latest technological developments to eliminate the need for people to man the security system.

You won’t be able to monitor your data’s sovereignty once you move to the cloud

Legally speaking, the physical location of your company can command where your business data is going to be held. For example, all public companies in Europe are required by law to store their corporate data in the European Union. This is not something that you need to worry about concerning the cloud. Most cloud providers today offer a vast range of data locations meaning you can always access one no matter where your company is located. Though sovereignty shouldn’t be any problem for you, you need to do your due diligence to ensure you remain on the right side of the law.

Moving to the cloud means you are going to have to move everything which could be very disruptive

When you start seriously considering moving vast amounts of your company’s data to the cloud, it’s easy to see why you could see it as a challenge. However, as with any change you are ever going to make in your company, you should take it slow to ensure you understand how the cloud truly works. Additionally, you and your employees will still feel like you are in control especially if you are so used to network based storage.

Now that we’ve got the myths dispelled, it’s time to seriously consider moving to the cloud. While on-premise storage is still a common phenomenon in most business, it’s not easy to ignore the fact that it is labor intensive, costly, uses a lot of energy and there’ still a chance that an insider can breach your security.

Cloud storage spells out so many more benefits aside from security. Time for you to keep up with the trend and move to the cloud.  I love it when I hear the traditional IT leader defend the position on why they want to build infrastructure and a data center, I guess the key phrase for them is Career Is Over (AKA CIO).

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

McKesson and Infor Go-To-Market Partnership – What Happens Now?

Posted on January 9, 2017 I Written By

For the past twenty years, I have been working with healthcare organizations to implement technologies and improve business processes. During that time, I have had the opportunity to lead major transformation initiatives including implementation of EHR and ERP systems as well as design and build of shared service centers. I have worked with many of the largest healthcare providers in the United States as well as many academic and children's hospitals. In this blog, I will be discussing my experiences and ideas and encourage everyone to share your own as well in the comments.

A couple weeks ago, McKesson and Infor announced a partnership that will have McKesson EIS (Enterprise Information Solutions) offering Infor Cloudsuite as their cloud-based ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) solution for human resources, supply chain, and financials. What does each party have to gain from this partnership and what does this mean for existing customers of McKesson ERP solutions?

Infor continues to be the dominant player in the ERP space for healthcare providers. Its healthcare applications, previously known as Lawson (and probably always known as Lawson to many of us), have the largest market share with the majority of larger hospitals and healthcare systems. Its closest competitor in the past, Peoplesoft, is now owned by Oracle which is focused on developing and promoting its Fusion product and has released the final version of the Peoplesoft product. Workday, the cloud-only solution that is publicly traded and making significant strives in many industries, has won deals in human resources and financials implementations but lacks a supply chain solution, critical to any integrated ERP deployment. SAP, the largest ERP provider in the world, has a strong presence in healthcare manufacturers but does not provide a supply chain solution well suited for the unique needs of healthcare providers, and therefore has a very small market share.

McKesson, once a strong player in this space, has faded over the years in ERP as they have with EHR solutions. The majority of the McKesson ERP customer base, using the products commonly referred to as Pathways, have been long-time legacy customers. Pathways has not been kept up with modern ERP needs, and it has been many years since I have seen a hospital consider Pathways as a potential solution, but rather it is typically the solution being replaced.

Infor has invested significantly in creating a cloud-based solution, referred to as CloudSuite. However, the existing healthcare customer base typically has an on-premise installation and therefore cloud adoption has been focused on new customers as well as those that are specifically looking to transition away from on-premise. McKesson has not had a cloud offering, therefore it would make sense for them to partner with someone to offer it as an alternative to Pathways.

Infor will gain access to the Mckesson customer base, many of whom are likely considering leaving Pathways for other solutions anyway. In addition, Infor will be able to provide Mckesson’s Strategic Sourcing solution for their customers.

However, it is unclear what that means for Pathways. While McKesson press releases state that CloudSuite is an alternative to Pathways, one has to wonder why Infor would want to expose their solution to someone who is actively selling a competitive solution, and why McKesson would continue to invest in Pathways when it has access to a much more mature and robust solution as a go-forward path for its Pathways customers.

Therefore while it is likely that McKesson will keep Pathways supported and up-to-date with regulatory improvements for the time being, it seems very unlikely that they would continue to enhance it – and inevitable that it will eventually be sunset in favor of transitioning those customers to Infor Cloudsuite. If history is indeed an appropriate predictor of the future, consider that McKesson announced its BetterHealth 2020 plan – in which they announced a focus on Paragon as their EHR but continued support of the older Horizon EHR product. Shortly after that they went back on that commitment and announced they would sunset Horizon in 2018.

Meaningful Use has led to a focus of resources on Electronic Health Records implementations which have led many customers to hold onto their older ERP solutions past their useful life. I suspect that the next two years will see a re-focus to ERP solutions with customers with more modern solutions focusing on upgrades and new feature deployment while customers with older solutions making a change.

Those customers who stayed on Horizon for too long are currently in a rush to implement replacements before the March 2018 sunset date.Customers on Pathways products should likely start the conversation now about their long-term ERP plans and consider if they want to get ahead of any sunset announcement.

If you’d like to receive future posts by Brian in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Healthcare Optimization Scene posts here. Be sure to also read the archive of previous Healthcare Optimization Scene posts.

Easing The Transition To Big Data

Posted on December 16, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Tapping the capabilities of big data has become increasingly important for healthcare organizations in recent years. But as HIT expert Adheet Gogate notes, the transition is not an easy one, forcing these organizations to migrate from legacy data management systems to new systems designed specifically for use with new types of data.

Gogate, who serves as vice president of consulting at Citius Tech, rightly points out that even when hospitals and health systems spend big bucks on new technology, they may not see any concrete benefits. But if they move through the big data rollout process correctly, their efforts are more likely to bear fruit, he suggests. And he offers four steps organizations can take to ease this transition. They include:

  • Have the right mindset:  Historically, many healthcare leaders came up through the business in environments where retrieving patient data was difficult and prone to delays, so their expectations may be low. But if they hope to lead successful big data efforts, they need to embrace the new data-rich environment, understand big data’s potential and ask insightful questions. This will help to create a data-oriented culture in their organization, Gogate writes.
  • Learn from other industries: Bear in mind that other industries have already grappled with big data models, and that many have seen significant successes already. Healthcare leaders should learn from these industries, which include civil aviation, retail and logistics, and consider adopting their approaches. In some cases, they might want to consider bringing an executive from one of these industries on board at a leadership level, Gogate suggests.
  • Employ the skills of data scientists: To tame the floods of data coming into their organization, healthcare leaders should actively recruit data scientists, whose job it is to translate the requirements of the methods, approaches and processes for developing analytics which will answer their business questions.  Once they hire such scientists, leaders should be sure that they have the active support of frontline staffers and operations leaders to make sure the analyses they provide are useful to the team, Gogate recommends.
  • Think like a startup: It helps when leaders adopt an entrepreneurial mindset toward big data rollouts. These efforts should be led by senior leaders comfortable with this space, who let key players act as their own enterprise first and invest in building critical mass in data science. Then, assign a group of core team members and frontline managers to areas where analytics capabilities are most needed. Rotate these teams across the organization to wherever business problems reside, and let them generate valuable improvement insights. Over time, these insights will help the whole organization improve its big data capabilities, Gogash says.

Of course, taking an agile, entrepreneurial approach to big data will only work if it has widespread support, from the C-suite on down. Also, healthcare organizations will face some concrete barriers in building out big data capabilities, such as recruiting the right data scientists and identifying and paying for the right next-gen technology. Other issues include falling reimbursements and the need to personalize care, according to healthcare CIO David Chou.

But assuming these other challenges are met, embracing big data with a willing-to-learn attitude is more likely to work than treating it as just another development project. And the more you learn, the more successful you’ll be in the future.

GE Healthcare Is Still In The Game

Posted on March 14, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

Below is the recent press release from GE Healthcare.  Their EMR will be used in the Rio 2016 Olympics which is a great win for GE.  The product has come a long way and they are making some great strides.  The challenge is where will the product fall in a healthcare EMR ecosystem that is predominately Epic and Cerner.   Personally I know of a few organizations that are evaluating a transition away from the GE Centricity platform due to either a merger with a bigger healthcare system that already has an enterprise EMR or they had a bad experience with Centricity and are moving on.  It will be interesting to see in the next 2-3 years how many EMR vendors we will have left.  I will definitely keep an eye on GE to see whether the recent win with the Olympic games will help create positive momentum in 2016.

LAS VEGAS–GE Healthcare announced today the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has selected the company’s Centricity Practice Solution as the official electronic medical record (EMR) to be used by the medical teams of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. This marks the first time that all athletes and spectators at the Olympic Games will have their health interactions managed by an electronic medical record. The announcement was made at the 2016 Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference in Las Vegas.

Centricity Practice Solution will be used for managing data related to injuries and illness for athletes competing in the games as well as spectators, officials, athlete family members and coaches who require medical assistance throughout the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. For the competitors, the data managed during the Games will be used to help drive optimal, individualized care to help athletes compete at a world-class level.

“The Olympic Games is about providing the best possible service to athletes,” said Dr. Richard Budgett, Medical and Scientific Director for the IOC. “The gold medal of medical services is something that is integrated and comprehensive: a total package. Adding access to an electronic medical record is key to our drive towards the prevention of injury. Without a proper medical, longitudinal record, it’s difficult for us to do surveillance and see what injuries are most common in certain sports. This would impact our ability to prevent and measure our effectiveness. The EMR is going to be a cornerstone for our medical services going forward.”

Centricity Practice Solution will be available in English and Portuguese and will provide access to next generation workflows, analytics and data to potentially help optimize athlete performance. The information will be analyzed to spot patterns and provide insights for future Games planning. Additionally, medical teams will be able to access diagnostic images and reports from within the EMR to assist in providing world-class care quickly and efficiently. GE’s EMR will be accessible at any of the multiple medical posts throughout the Games and at the central Polyclinic in the Olympic Village where more complex care is delivered.

“By selecting Centricity Practice Solutions EMR, the IOC is extending the clinical care and data management capabilities pioneered by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), which has used GE’s EMR platform for the past two Olympic Games in London and Sochi,” said Jon Zimmerman, General Manager, GE Centricity Business Solutions. “Incorporating an EMR platform into the healthcare services will enable medical staff at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games access to real time data, analytics and health information to help their athletes perform at peak capabilities.”

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

The Amazon Echo – Bringing Sci Fi Reality to Healthcare

Posted on February 16, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

My initial impression of the Amazon Echo was that this is simply a Bluetooth speaker that looks like a portable humidifier with a little bit of artificial intelligence. The next thing I discovered is that the Echo always needs to be plugged in for it to work. But then, after playing around with it, I realized that the Amazon Echo is actually quite impressive.

The Echo introduces the handy Alexa function. The initial conversations with Alexa are very simple. You can ask about the weather, the time, sports results, or the latest news. But with time, I learned that Alexa could even read an audio book; tell me about the local businesses; and where to go for a Thai dinner.

The other benefit of Echo its accessibility and quality. It comes with a remote control or you may control it via your mobile device after downloading the Amazon echo app. The bottom part of the Echo has a 360-degree speaker that surprisingly fills the entire room with sound. Even at a distance of 9-10 feet Alexa can pick up commands.

Because of the sophisticated voice activated system, the Echo has great potential for use by patients in a healthcare setting. The main use case that I see is in the hospital’s patient room. Let’s think of a scenario where we have a 50-year-old patient in the hospital that had just gone through a surgery procedure and is expected to be in the hospital for two days. Echo can be a great device to allow personalization such as: integration to the patient’s Spotify music, control of the room temperature and blinds, the ability to order an Uber for the patient’s family, as well as many other features of a smart home. The goal will be to bring the technology of a smart home into a patient’s room to enhance the patient’s experience away from home.

From a clinical perspective, the Echo can assist the medical provider by reciting the medical education transcribed by the doctor to the patient, such as: the side effects of a prescription drug that the patient should expect for the next month after surgery. If we go back to the example of the patient who is recovering from surgery and has been prescribed drugs, the Echo can either be a replacement or an integrated device for the nurse call system where the patient can ask for pain medication through Echo. In addition, patients can also order their meals through the device if it is integrated with the dietary system in the hospital. As such, the voice-activated system would clearly be a great two-way communication tool for the patient who may not be able to move from their bed with ease.

As healthcare is moving towards the goal of creating the best patient experience possible, we have to start integrating consumer products with the strategy of providing a hotel-like experience in an inpatient room. The integration of smart room technology and voice activation communication has become an invaluable part of luxury hotels, and likewise, we must attempt to replicate that same kind of technology and convenience in hospitals.   I have personally witnessed a lot of success by international hospitals incorporating the hotel experience into their culture to improve patient experience. Similarly, I believe that hospitals in the US must start to adjust our strategy in order to meet the expectation of today’s consumer-patients.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Revival of the Physician-Patient Relationships via Electronic Technology

Posted on February 9, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

One of the latest fads in healthcare is patient-engagement. This is not a new concept at all, but has been practiced in some form for decades. However, with the availability of electronic technology, physicians and healthcare institutions have now embarked on new ways to engage patients. For many years now, there has been a discord in patient-physician relationships. Patients have often felt that healthcare workers never spend adequate time on their cases, rarely allowing them to participate in any decisions and almost never explaining the details about their medical disorders. This bitterness has led many patients to seek alternative healthcare options.

There is now preliminary evidence that use of electronic technology can help improve patient-doctor relationships and also lead to effective treatments and better outcomes.  Patient engagement using electronic technology is also not a new concept. It was first attempted when the Internet was developed in the mid 90s, but failed to gather storm because the technology was relatively new and there was no such thing as androids. The available mobile phones of that time were largely redundant devices that were only used for communication.

Today, almost every healthcare institution and many healthcare workers have web pages that provide educational information to patients. This was the first step in engaging patients. However, with the present availability of mobile devices, the healthcare industry has been able to leap forward. Many clinics now have Apps that give patients access to information, such as: when the doctor will be in the office; how long the wait will be in the ER; possible diagnoses of medical disorders; billing information; and future appointments. Some healthcare practitioners have gone one step further and even offer teleconferencing for patients who are not able to make it to their appointments.

The current strengthening of the patient-physician relationship is further evidenced by the fact that doctors are now encouraging patients to play a greater role in their healthcare and make informed decisions. Shared decision making is now a universal theme in many healthcare institutions. Patient portals can help patients better manage their chronic disorders like diabetes, arthritis, asthma or hypertension. More importantly, this method of engaging patients allows for faster responses from healthcare workers, who now have dedicated staff to answer mobiles phone queries from patients. For example, pharmacists are now able to use mobile technology to help patients better manage their medications, by recording their intake and advising the patients on how to avoid drug interactions.

With the rise of electronic technology, many patients now have most of their medical information, such as medical history and list of medication, stored on their mobile devices which makes it easier to share with healthcare workers when necessary. This dynamic flow of information not only streamlines care, but also fosters continuous and consistent care between the patient and physician. An example of this continuous care may be found in software programs that identify patients in need of particular services, such as annual mammograms, pap smears and chest x-rays. Once these patients are identified, the healthcare workers are able to contact them right away to advise the patient of their specific required medical service, while the software system assists in preventing missed appointments by sending reminders.

Notwithstanding the above, however, patient engagement via use of electronic technology is not without problems. The first and foremost problem is security. Mobile phones routinely get misplaced or stolen and the medical data could easily fall into wrong hands. Secondly, the elderly who make up for the majority of patients in the USA are not usually tech savvy, with very few of them using such mobile devices. Even those who do have a mobile phone are not well versed with Apps or retrieving medical information online.

Additionally, in order for mobile devices to be effective for patient engagement, the healthcare workers need to be efficient in supporting the technology to capitalize on its potential benefits. Even today, one of the most common complaints made by patients is that healthcare providers often times do not return phone calls in a timely manner or even at all. So in order to engage patients, healthcare workers also need to be play an active role. Just sending medical information to a mobile device is not what patients want.

No matter how advanced technology has become, patient engagement via electronic means will never replace the soothing voice or touch of a healthcare provider in the office. It is clear that patient engagement is vital for a successful physician-patient relationship. In fact, there is strong evidence that patients who participate actively in their own care have better medical outcomes and fruitful relationships with their healthcare provider. However, it is important to remember that patient engagement is a two way street. Electronic technology can do wonders for healthcare providers and healthcare institutions, but make no mistake, it can also become a detriment very quickly if not applied and supported adequately. In essence, healthcare providers must remember that current electronic technology can only serve as an assisting tool in managing patients – it cannot act as the healthcare provider itself.

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