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Do Hospital CIOs Have the IT They Need?

Posted on February 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at a CIO reception at the HIMSS-CHIME Forum, I took part in an interesting conversation with a group of CIOs. They were talking about the number of phone calls they get from vendors. They had some unique insights and approaches into how they handled all the incoming messaging from vendors. I’ll save most of those insights for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference that I host, but he also offered this interesting nugget when he said the following:

Our organization more or less has what we need to be successful. We aren’t looking to add more.

He did later acknowledge that if that wasn’t true, that they would go out and search for the vendors as opposed to an incoming call from a sales person.

This CIO’s comment struck me. I don’t think he was being so arrogant as to say that they weren’t going to purchase any more IT solutions. However, I think he was saying that he didn’t see any major enterprise purchases on his horizon.

On the one hand, I think that’s a sign of a maturing of the industry. His hospital organization finally had the IT tools they needed to be successful. That’s a good thing since I think if we’d had the conversation 3-5 years ago it would have been very different.

On the other hand, it’s kind of scary to think that this hospital CIO isn’t really looking at the IT environment around him and looking for new tools and solutions that could make his organization even better. This is a simple illustration of how every IT organization can get in a rut and stop innovating if we’re not careful.

At some point in any IT implementation, you have to step back and double down on the investments you’ve already made. There are huge opportunities in every healthcare organization I’ve seen to maximize the benefits they’re receiving from the IT they’ve already implemented. It’s fair to say that this CIO was at that stage of the game. It was time to stop searching and implementing other systems and time to optimize what’s already in place. That’s a good thing as long as it’s not taken too far.

I think the hospital health IT industry is largely in the same place as this CIO. Most aren’t looking to make new purchases. Instead, they want to extract value out of their previous purchases. What do you think? Have you seen this same sort of market maturity? Any idea on what will be next that will change this CIO and the industry’s thinking?

Is Your Current Analytics Infrastructure Keeping You From Success in Healthcare Analytics?

Posted on February 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a paid blog post sponsored by Intel.

Healthcare analytics is all the talk in healthcare right now.  It’s really no surprise since many have invested millions and even billions of dollars in digitizing their health data.  Now they want to extract value from that data.  No doubt, the promise of healthcare analytics is powerful.  I like to break this promise out into two categories: Patient Analysis and Patient Influence.

Patient Analysis

On the one side of healthcare analytics is analyzing your patient population to pull reports on patients who need extra attention.  In some cases, these patients are the most at risk portions of your population with easy to identify disease states.  In other cases, they’re the most expensive portion of your population.  Both of these are extremely powerful analytics as your healthcare organization works to improve patient care and lower costs.

An even higher level of patient analysis is using healthcare analytics to identify patients who don’t seem to be at risk, but whose health is in danger.  These predictive analytics are much more difficult to create because by their very nature they’re imperfect.  However, this is where the next generation of patient analysis is going very quickly.

Patient Influence

On the other side of healthcare analytics is using patient data to influence patients.  Patient influence analytics can tell you simple things like what type of communication modality is preferred by a patient.  This can be used on an individual level to understand whether you should send an email, text, or make a phone call or it can be used on the macro level to drive the type of technologies you buy and content you create.

Higher level patient influence analytics take it one step further as they analyze a patient’s unique preferences and what influences the patient’s healthcare decision making.  This often includes pulling in outside consumer data that helps you understand and build a relationship with the patient.  This analytic might tell you that the patient is a huge sports fan and which is their favorite team.  It might also tell you that this person has a type A personality.  Together these analytics can inform you on the most appropriate ways and methods to interact and influence the patient.

What’s Holding Healthcare Analytics Back?

Both of these healthcare analytics approaches have tremendous promise, but many of them are being held back by a healthcare organization’s current analytics infrastructure.

The first problem many organizations have is where they are storing their data.  I’d describe their data as being stored in virtual prisons.  We need to unlock this data and free it so that it can be used in healthcare analytics.  If you can’t get at the data within your own organization, how can we even start talking about all the health data being stored outside the four walls of your organization?  Plus, we need to invest in the right storage that can support the growth of this data.  If you don’t solve these data access and storage pieces, you’ll miss out on a lot of the benefits of healthcare analytics.

Second, do you trust your data?  Most hospital CIOs I talk to usually respond, “Mostly.”  If you can’t trust your data, you can’t trust your analytics.  A fundamental building block of successful analytics is building trust in your data.  This starts by implementing effective workflows that capture the data properly on the front end.

Next, do you have the processing power required to process all these analytics and data?  Healthcare analytics in many healthcare organizations reminds me of the old days when graphic designers and video producers would have to wait hours for graphics programs to load or videos to render.  Eventually we learned not to skimp on processing power for these tasks.  We need to learn this same lesson with healthcare analytics.  Certainly cloud makes this easier, but far too often we under fund the processing power needed for these projects.

Finally, all the processing power in the world won’t help if you don’t have your most important piece of analytics infrastructure: people.  No doubt, finding experienced people in healthcare data analytics is a challenge.  It is the hardest thing to do on this list since it is very competitive and very expensive.  The good news is that if you solve the other problems above, then you become an attractive place for these experts to work.

In your search for a healthcare analytics expert, you can likely find a data expert.  You can find a clinical expert.  You can find an EHR expert.  Finding someone who can work across all three is the Holy Grail and nearly impossible to find.  This is why in most organizations healthcare analytics is a team sport.  Make sure that as you build your infrastructure of healthcare analytics people, you make sure they are solid team players.

It’s time we start getting more value out of our EHR and health IT systems.  Analytics is one of those tools that will get us there.  Just be sure that your current infrastructure isn’t holding you back from achieving those goals.

If this topic interests you and you’ll be at HIMSS 2017, join us at the Intel Health Booth #2661 on Tuesday, 2/21 from 2:00-2:45 PM where we’ll be holding a special meetup to discuss Getting Ready for Precision Health.  This meetup will also be available virtually via Periscope on the @IntelHealth Twitter account.

Hospital EMR and EHR Milestone – 1 Million Pageviews

Posted on February 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I was just looking over the stats for Hospital EMR and EHR and noticed that were right at 1 million pageviews for this site. That’s a pretty amazing accomplishment for such a niche site. Especially since we’ve moved a lot of the traffic off of the site and onto our email list. Looks like this will make the 1111th blog post for Hospital EMR and EHR and it has 25,293 email subscribers (Subscribe Here) to the content we generate on this site. That’s a really amazing thing since we email those on the list 3-5 times per week. Hospital EMR and EHR has become a really important part of Healthcare Scene and we’re happy to contribute to the hospital healthcare IT industry at large.

On this milestone, we want to thank some of our recent sponsors that have made what we do possible. If you enjoy reading our content, please take a second to look through our sponsors to see if one of them can help make your life easier.

Stericycle Communication Solutions – Stericycle has been a long time sponsor of multiple Healthcare Scene blogs. Plus, they have written the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts which are an excellent read if you’re interested in strategies for healthcare engagement. They also have a free guide that addresses the question Patient or Consumer? This is a great company that’s really working to make the patient experience better.

Galen Healthcare Solutions – We’ve had the chance to work with Galen Healthcare Solutions across a number of different mediums including email, display ads, and sponsored content. You’ve probably read their Tackling EHR and EMR Transition series where they’ve shared a lot of great insights into how your organization should handle archiving old legacy data and also how you can migrate data from one EHR to a new EHR. Both of these topics are going to become increasingly important and Galen Healthcare Solutions have become real experts. Be sure to check out their Free Data Archive whitepaper and their Free EHR Migration whitepaper.

Medical Software Advice (A Gartner Company) – I’ve been working with Medical Software Advice for a very long time. They’ve provided a really great service to my readers around EHR selection. With 300+ EHR vendors out there, it can be hard to cut through the various options. Medical Software Advice has helped out hundreds of companies with their EHR selection including setting up EHR demos and getting EHR pricing. Check out their Top 5 EHR Software list.

4Med – 4Med is another partner that we’ve worked with for a very long time. They’ve consistently offered some great educational content (include CEUs) for the healthcare IT professional. Here are some of their upcoming courses that are great examples: HIPAA Compliance Officer, Patient Centered Medical Home Project Manager, and ACI MACRA-MIPA Project Manager. Each of those links gives you a discount off the regular registration price.

HIPAAOne – HIPAA compliance has always been essential to healthcare, but meaningful use and now MACRA have made the HIPAA Risk Assessment a priority for many organizations. What’s shocking to me is how many organizations haven’t done a proper HIPAA Risk assessment. HIPAA One has created a really great software solution to automate your HIPAA Risk Assessment. I like to call them the Tax Act or H&R Block software for HIPAA compliance. If you’ve got a stack of Excel spreadsheets managing your HIPAA Risk Assessment, take a second to look at how HIPAAOne can make your job easier. Also, they have a great 5 min HIPAA compliance quiz to assess some of key HIPAA compliance areas.

We’re also excited to announce our new Healthcare Scene media kit. It’s been amazing to see the evolution of what we’re able to offer healthcare IT vendors. We really want to develop deep relationships with our advertisers and not just take their money and run. We think that’s the best thing for both our readers and our advertisers. If you’re trying to get the word out to the hospital market, let us how we can help on our contact us page.

I couldn’t finish this post without saying a massive thank you to our readers. It’s hard to know exactly what kind of impact you’re having when you blog. However, every once in a while you get a glimpse into the benefit your blog posts are providing readers and that makes it all worthwhile. Thank you to each of you who read and support our work.

Now, on to the next million pageviews!

When Healthcare IT Isn’t Enough

Posted on February 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I’ve gone through close to 200 pitches from companies who want to meet with me at the HIMSS Annual conference. While I can’t say that this is a fun task (especially since I have to tell 95% of them no), it is an educational experience to see what 200 companies are sharing as we head into the biggest healthcare IT conference in the world.

If I were to summarize the pitches in general, I would describe them as incremental. I’ll admit that this is a pretty disappointing perspective since we all know that healthcare needs something transformational. Don’t get me wrong. I believe that regular incremental improvement is transformational, but I’d say that most of the pitches lacked ambition.

Along with this observation is the idea that in most cases technology isn’t enough. If it were enough, EHR software that’s in use in most of healthcare would have already transformed the industry. The longer I spend in this industry, the more I realize that technology is just a tool in the tool belt. The real transformation comes from something more than technology. Technology might be a catalyst or facilitator, but that’s all.

This is actually a theme that really began at last year’s HIMSS conference. The areas that excite me most are those that literally change behavior. This might be the patient’s behavior or it might be the clinician’s behavior. It might also be the payer, health system, or government’s behavior.

The challenge is that changing behavior is hard. Slapping an EMR system is easy compared to behavior change. Implementing a secure text message solution is easy compared to behavior change. Rolling out an enterprise data warehouse is easy compared to behavior change.

At HIMSS and throughout the year I’m most interested on those companies who understand not only the technology side of things, but the behavior side of things as well.

If you’re interested in healthcare transformation and what it requires, join us at the Digital Transformation Meetup at HIMSS17. It’s happening Tuesday, 2/21 from 11:30-12:30 at the Dell EMC Booth #3161. More details on this meetup and other HIMSS17 meetups can be found here.

Suggestions and Tips for Hospital IT Professionals at #HIMSS17

Posted on February 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Hard to believe that the 2017 HIMSS Annual Conference is less than a week and a half away. For someone who eats, breathes, and sleeps Health IT, HIMSS is like winning the golden ticket to visit Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. However, for a lot of hospital IT professionals, it might be their first time attending HIMSS and it can be quite overwhelming. 40,000-50,000 attendees and approximately 1300 exhibitors should be overwhelming.

While I’m certainly not a HIMSS veteran like many people, I’ve learned a number of important tips and tricks that will help you get the most out of HIMSS. Hopefully some of these will help you have a better HIMSS experience.

Standard Conference Answers – Instead of listing these individually, I’ll list them all in one since they’re true for any conference and their reasons should be now apparent. Wear comfortable shoes. Drink lots of water. Plan for good meals. Bring a battery pack or charge whenever possible. Expect bad internet. Have fun.

CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum – As a hospital IT professional, the CHIME-HIMSS CIO Forum on Saturday and Sunday before HIMSS is excellent. They put together a great program of speakers, but more importantly you get the chance to network with 1000 or so of people like you. Don’t miss it if you come from the hospital IT world.

People – This one is obvious once you think about it, but is often missed by attendees. The people you hang out with at a conference will make all the difference. If you hang out with smart, well connected people, you’ll meet a bunch of other smart, well connected people and you’ll have a great experience. If you feel you don’t know anyone good to hang out with, hit social media and start interacting with people you find interesting. Friendships will develop quickly if you put in a little effort. Who you spend time with can transform your HIMSS experience for good or bad.

Plan for Serendipity – Everyone likes to suggest that the key to HIMSS is to have a plan. Considering the volume of sessions and exhibitors, a plan is good. However, don’t forget to plan in time for serendipitous interactions. Maybe that’s putting a party on your schedule that will broaden your horizon. Maybe that’s putting some down time on your schedule to sit at a table and connect with some random strangers. Maybe that’s some time trolling the exhibit hall to meet new people and companies that will provide you new perspectives. My favorite experience at HIMSS16 was a random dinner that came together after meeting someone at an impromptu meetup.

Don’t Be a Wallflower, Engage with Others – It’s easy to go to a conference and spend your entire time listening to sessions and exhibitor presentations and pitches. While this is valuable, you’ll have a deeper, more engaging experience at HIMSS17 if you engage with the people around you. Yes, I’m suggesting you go beyond just the usual casual platitudes of where you work and where you’re from. If this scares you or you don’t know how to get started, join us at a #HIMSS17 meetup where everyone is there to do just that. Education is valuable, but engagement is priceless.

Those are a few of my tips for #HIMSS17. What tips would you add to the list?

Health IT Predictions for #HIMSS17

Posted on January 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Dr. Geeta Nayyar, has a great post up with various HIMSS 2017 social media ambassadors making predictions at the hot topics we’ll hear about at HIMSS 2017 and throughout the year. I was happy to take part and offered the following prediction:

“Actionable data and patient empowerment are two hot topics at HIMSS this year. We’re going to see a whole slew of applications that take data from clinical decision support at the point of care or real-time analytics that assesses a patients’ risk, and make it actionable. Patient empowerment is going to be enhanced with applications for self-scheduling, patient communication through text and telemedicine and possibly even the first healthcare chatbots.”

I also was quite interested in Rasu Shrestha‘s prediction:

“This is the year we see the emergence of the ‘learning health system.’ With the advent of machine learning and AI, and with the perfect storm of healthcare related needs and opportunities, we will see a true emergence of intelligent systems that will learn and get better over time.”

The idea of a learning health system is a lot to chew on. That’s a big concept that won’t happen over night. However, there’s so much potential in the concept. I’ll be interested to see what technologies are showcased at HIMSS which will help us get closer to a learning health system. What technologies have you seen are helping us get there?

Geeta has posted a bunch of other predictions from HIMSS social media ambassadors, so take a second to head over to her TopLine MD blog and check them out.

Are Security Certifications Needed to Simplify the Acquisition Process?

Posted on January 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m generally someone who hates certifications. However, I hate them because they’re often implemented poorly and easily gamed. When they’re implemented effectively, they can be extremely helpful. Think about all the safety certifications that electronics have you go through. I’m sure they’ve saved our lives and saved our houses getting burnt down many times over.

I’ve wondered if a security certification would be useful for healthcare IT applications. Certainly it wouldn’t be perfect (security never is), but it could serve as a baseline security check that would help healthcare organizations with their acquisition process.

The reality is that many organizations don’t properly vet the healthcare IT applications they purchase for security. They aren’t consistent and they have limited resources. A security certification in theory would spread the costs of certifying a healthcare application’s security across a large number of organizations and thus save everyone money.

The key to this certification is not to have it as a kind of pass/fail certification. Sure, you want to say that it meets a certain standard of security, but more importantly it would also create a report on what type of security was implemented for that software.

Take encryption for example. Every healthcare organization looks for encryption. A security certification could ensure that the software system has implemented certification appropriately and also describe how the encryption was implemented. Is it end to end security encryption. Do they encrypt the data at rest? What about encryption of the data being stored on the customer’s device? etc etc etc

One challenge with this idea is that CIOs, health IT companies, and other technology professionals can become over reliant on certifications. It would have to be clear that the security certification was just a baseline and not a 100% foolproof way to secure your IT software. This is a challenge since health IT sales reps are going to position a security certification as such. It would take some effective marketing for people to know that the security certification could save them time in their security analysis of a new health IT software purchase, but wasn’t the end all be all.

I imagine some people would argue that this type of certification and details about how an organization or software company implements their security would be a treasure trove for hackers. Certainly you’d have to be careful with what you share and how you share it. However, most of the details are things that a good hacker could figure out anyway.

As it is today, health IT companies just say they’re HIPAA compliant (whatever that means) and many healthcare CIOs are floundering with limited resources for evaluating the security of the applications they buy. A security certification could help them make some headway on this I think.

Done the right way, a security certification could help set a new bar for how vendors approach security. That could be a very good thing. Of course, if not updated regularly and effectively, it could also require a bunch of hoop jumping that doesn’t provide real value. It’s a tricky challenge.

Healthcare’s Not Good At Mining Health Data

Posted on January 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was really blown away by this quote from an interview with Rebecca Quammen.

The buzz around data analytics promotes the need for data scientists and data analysts as among the most sought-after roles, and that is problematic in and of itself. It’s creating a huge demand, but it’s also a demand that many healthcare organizations don’t know how to deal with right now. I see the buzz around data analytics increasing the pressure to “do something” with data, but many organizations across the nation, both large and small and in every setting of care, simply don’t have the foundational knowledge to manage the data to their benefit, and to know the database structure and how to get it the data out and what the data tells them when they get it. We are not an industry historically good at mining good, rich data out of products and doing something meaningful with it. We do traditional reporting and we may do a little bit of historical reporting, but we’re not good at looking at data to predict and promote and to work toward the future, or to see trends and do analysis across the organization.

Rebecca nailed this one on the head. I’ve seen a bunch of organizations go running towards healthcare informatics with no idea of what they wanted to accomplish or any sort of methodology for how they’re going to analyze the data to find useful insights. It kind of reminds me of the herd mentality that happens at conferences. If any sort of crowd starts to build at a conference, then the crowd quickly grows exponentially as people think that something interesting must be going on. The same seems to happen as healthcare organizations have run towards data analytics.

While I think there’s so much potential in health data analytics, I think that most organizations are afraid to fail. The culture in healthcare is “do no harm.” There are some very good reasons for this and some real fears when it comes to medical liability. There’s a lot more at stake when using data in healthcare than say Netflix trying to predict which shows you might be interested in watching. If Netflix gets it wrong, you just keep scrolling after some minor frustration which you quickly forget. In healthcare, if we get it wrong, people can die or be harmed in some major way.

I understand why this healthcare culture exists, but I also think that inactivity is killing as many or more people than would be damaged by our data mistakes. It’s a challenging balance. However, it’s a balance that we must figure out. We need to enable more innovation and thoughtful experimentation into how we can better use health data. Yes, I’m talking beyond the traditional reporting and historical reporting which doesn’t move the needle on care. I’m talking using data to really impact care. That’s a brave place to be, but I applaud all of those brave people who are exploring this new world.

Indecision in Upgrading Infrastructure – Blamed on Meaningful Use

Posted on January 6, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a conversation I had with Steve Prather, CEO at Dizzion, he made a really interesting observation about meaningful use causing delays in upgrading infrastructure at many healthcare organizations. It’s not hard to see how spending millions, hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars on EHR and related services in order to meet the meaningful use requirements could cause budget cuts in other areas like upgrading infrastructure.

Of course, the opposite can be true as well. I know when we first implemented an EHR, a good portion of the EHR budget was to upgrade some of the infrastructure needed to support the new software. I’m sure that probably means that some infrastructure benefited from the EHR upgrade and meaningful use, but I’m sure some infrastructure spending also got cut or delayed.

In my conversation with Steve he went on to observe that much of the hardware in healthcare organizations had gotten so old, indecision and delays were no longer a choice. Having talked to many CIOs, they feel this in their organizations. While many CIOs want to move on to more strategic efforts, there’s still a big part of any CIOs job that requires them to maintain and upgrade their IT infrastructure. Although, it seems that many of them are looking to push this responsibility off to a kind of IT COO position.

I’ll be interested to watch and see how these organizations approach their infrastructure upgrades. Will most continue to do all the work in house or will they start to outsource this essentially commodity task to an outside company? There’s a really interesting case for why organizations should outsource this work as opposed to continuing to do it in house. All of this points back to the CIO becoming a vendor management organization.

Has your infrastructure upgrades been delayed by meaningful use? Is your organization looking to finally upgrade or is MACRA going to delay things further?

Top Hospital EMR and EHR Blog Posts for 2016

Posted on December 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s that time of year when you look back at the past year and think about what you’ve accomplished. At Hospital EMR and EHR, we like to look back at the stats for the top blog posts we’ve published. It’s always interesting to see what’s resonated with people. Plus, it’s interesting to see how things have changed since we’ve posted on a topic. So, without further ado, here’s a look at the top blog posts in 2016 for Hospital EMR and EHR along with some commentary on each.

1. Why Is It So Hard to Become a Certified Epic consultant? – This is by far the top post generating 4-10 times as much traffic as the posts below.  It’s also why I’ve wanted to make the time to do a whole series of blog posts on Epic Certification and along with it Cerner Certification, MEDITECH Certification, etc.  When you make something like Epic Certification hard to get, people want it even more.  It’s just too bad they’re so closed since it drives up the prices for Epic consultants and thus the cost to implement Epic.  Certainly, we’ll be writing about this more in the future.

2. NYC Hospitals Face Massive Problems With Epic Install – This was a big story back in 2013 and still is today.  We should probably look at doing a follow up story to see what’s happening at NYC hospitals a few years after this story hit.

3. Epic Install Triggers Loss At MD Anderson – No surprise, people love to read about challenges in EHR implementations.  We saw quite a few of these from Epic in 2016 and people were interested in what went wrong.  The problem from the outside is it’s really hard to know who is to blame for the failure.  What has become clear over this year is that many healthcare organizations are blaming Epic for their revenue issues.

4. Hospital EMR and EHR Vendors – This page needs some work, but no doubt many people want to know who the big players in the hospital EMR and EHR market are.  This is true if they’re selecting a new EHR, switching EHR or looking to partner with EHR companies.

5. Why Do People Dislike Epic So Much? Let Me Count The Ways – This post is 5.5 years old and still going strong.  I imagine many people are still counting the ways they hate Epic.  I think I read that Epic finally hired a PR person.  Maybe that new hire can work on this.

6. A Study on the Impact of ICD-10 on Coding and Revenue Cycle – This was a good study that illustrated the impact of ICD-10.  It also gave some good words of caution about the impact of ICD-10 going forward.

7. Epic EMR Costs Drag Down Finances At Brigham and Women’s – Another example of the cost to implement Epic.  I knew this was a hot topic this year and the stats show that people were interested in the details.

8. The Argument for Meditech – I can’t believe this post is 5 years old already, but it still rings true today.  MEDITECH is not without its challenges, but it also doesn’t get the credit it deserves either.  I had a chance to visit their offices near Boston this year.  I’ll be really interested to see where MEDITECH takes their product next.  Many people have counted them out, but I certainly haven’t.

9. Can HIM Professionals Become Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists? – We’ve published a lot about the changing world of HIM thanks to our new series of HIM Scene blog posts.  This post was a great example of how there are a lot of new opportunities for HIM professionals that are willing to embrace change and adapt as needed.

10. Great Healthcare IT Leaders – This is a great list of healthcare IT leaders as shared by David Chou.  David made the case for meeting up with them at HIMSS 2016, but the nice part is thanks to social media you can follow most of them year round.

An honorable mention to the 11th post on the list which talks about Dr. Rasu Shrestha helping an injured passenger on his way to HIMSS 2016.  Love stories like this.  Did you have a favorite post on Hospital EMR and EHR?  Was there an idea or concept you read on Hospital EMR and EHR?  We’d love to hear about it in the comments.