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$34.7 Billion Spent on Meaningful Use

Posted on July 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CMS has put out the latest data on meaningful use participation and payments. They broke the Medicare dollars out by meaningful use stage 1 and stage 2. Meaningful use stage 1 cost nearly $20 billion. Meaningful use stage 2 cost $3.4 billion. The amounts were less for stage 2, but that’s still a massive drop off.

Less than half of eligible providers participated in stage 2 that participated in stage 1 (308k compared to 145k). Participating hospitals dropped from 4600 hospitals to 3096. This illustrates well what we’ve been saying for a while as far as hospitals still largely participating in meaningful use and most doctors choosing not to participate.

Also interesting to note is that at its peak, meaningful use was paying about $10 billion per year. In 2015, they spent $2.8 billion.

What I didn’t see in this report was any numbers on the cost savings that the meaningful use program provided. All the OIG estimates for meaningful use talked about how much money would be spent, but they also calculated how much money would be saved as well. As I recall they estimated about $36 billion in spending, but about $16 billion in savings. That would put the cost of the meaningful use program at $20 billion instead of the full $36 billion which it looks like we’ve now pretty much spent.

I like that HHS puts out this accountability as far as where the meaningful use money was spent. Shouldn’t we have some accountability as far as the savings as well? Do they not have a way to calculate it? Are they afraid that there weren’t cost savings? Or that meaningful use actually added costs? Maybe it’s in another report and I just missed it. If you know of that other report, I’d love to see it.

What do you think of these numbers? What’s been the benefit of the $34.7 billion that’s been spent? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

Healthcare Tradition and Healthcare Innovation

Posted on July 5, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Innovation and Tradition

I think we have to be careful taking this comment too far. Many healthcare traditions are good. We shouldn’t throw out all healthcare traditions. However, we should question many of our healthcare traditions to see, Who’s right, who’s wrong, and how might things have changed?

I’ve heard and seen far too many stories of doctors and other healthcare professionals that aren’t interested in listening to anything that would require them to change. I believe it’s the minority of providers, but it’s a stubborn minority that’s causing much of healthcare not to progress. The largest group is likely those that are willing to change but don’t take the time to explore change (I don’t blame them for not exploring more considering the treadmill we’ve stuck them on). They do what they’ve “always” done because they don’t know any better. There’s safety in doing what you’ve “always” done.

All of that said, Andy is right that innovation lives in the midst of change and discomfort.

Nominate Someone to the #HIT100

Posted on July 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As has become a July 4th tradition, the healthcare IT social media community comes together to recognize the incredible people on healthcare social media that influence their lives. It’s called the #HIT100 and happens on Twitter with people nominating the people that influence them for good. It’s really simple to participate and a great way to show some gratitude and love for someone you appreciate. Here are the details from the official announcement:

Required hashtags:

(Each nomination should have all of these)

  • #HIT100 or #HIT99 (One or the other is required)
  • #HealthIT (Optional)
  • #HITsm (Optional)

Optional hashtags:

(Please use only one of them so that the analytics have value)

  • #FHIR (Optional)
  • #Interoperability (Optional)
  • #PersonalizedMedicine or #PrecisionMedicine (Optional)
  • #Genomics

Some rules will change this year due to the analytical tools being put in place for the first time:

NOMINATION RULES:

  1. Nominations start
    Friday July 1st 2016 at 6PM and end on Friday July 8th at 6PM
  2. Only one person at a time may be nominated.  Multi-nominations in one tweet will not be counted though they might form part of the analytical information base
  3. Only direct nominations will be counted.  Retweets will not be counted though they may be analyzed for further enjoyment
  4. Favorites will not be counted though they may be analyzed for further entertainment
  5. There will only be one cycle of nominations.  No delegates or super-delegates here
  6. I reserve the judgement to disqualify a nomination that I find suspicious for any reason
  7. You are encouraged to include one of the optional hashtags above so that we can process with analytics to get some statistics about each one of them
  8. You can add a sentiment to the end of the nomination
  9. You must have fun and please follow each other as you discover new members of our community

If that’s too confusing, here are a couple examples. You can copy and then edit as appropriate.

I nominate @ehrandhit to the #HIT100 list – #HealthIT #HITsm #FHIR – Because they curate amazing content!

I nominate @techguy to the #HIT100 list – #HealthIT #HITsm He offers great insights into #PrecisionMedicine

Join in the fun and recognize your favorite people on social media! Happy 4th of July!

The Rise of the “EHR Value” Equation at Hospitals

Posted on July 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve heard a lot of people talk about how it will be impossible for ambulatory EHR vendors like athenahealth and eCW to break into the acute care market. For those following along at home, both companies have announced that they’re building out their EHR software for the acute care market. These are big bets by both companies, but I think many people don’t realize the advantage these companies will have going into the very expensive hospital EHR market.

Companies like eCW and athenahealth will be able to come into a hospital with a native cloud platform that will let them offer some really aggressive pricing. When you’re paying $50+ million for an EHR (or $9+ billion for some), there’s a lot of wiggle room for a new entrant to enter the fray at a much lower cost point. That lower cost point will totally change the EHR value equation for hospitals. In fact, these cloud based hospital EHR will likely be able to compete effectively against a legacy EHRs upgrade costs alone.

Don’t believe this is possible? Take a look at the story about Delta Regional Hospital returning to MEDITECH. Why did they do it? Thomas Moore, vice president and CFO at Delta said, “We were looking for a system with a lower cost of ownership without sacrificing quality.” Moore later added this comment, “MEDITECH is a company that truly understands the meaning of value.”

During the wild west phase of EHR where the industry was propped up by $36 billion in stimulus money, everyone had the perfect rationale for spending hundreds of millions (and even billions) on EHR software. As we return to a more rational market we’re going to see hospital CIOs starting to place a much larger emphasis on EHR value. Showing that value is going to be hard for some of the larger EHR vendors who’ve charged hundreds of millions and even billions of dollars to their customers. Plus, it will be hard for them to lower their price.

In one online thread I participate on, a bunch of people were bashing Delta Regional Hospital’s decision to go back to MEDITECH. However, a former CIO offered this great insight:

Ya gotta spend time in a Meditech shop. It’s not flashy, but from a value perspective (and it does a lot more than just EHR), it’s hard to beat.

The same is going to be true with acute care EHR from eCW and athenahealth, but they’ll have some of the sexy factor as well. In the acute care EHR world I believe we’re just entering the new world of EHR value. Those who can tell the story of the value they’ve created for customers are going to win. Plus, we’re going to see a fierce battle from new entrants who are going to try and undercut the market. Think about how the EHR value equation changes when you can charge even $75 million instead of $100 million. That’s a game changer.

A Humorous Look at Healthcare as #HFMA2016ANI Begins

Posted on June 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As part of RelayHealth’s (Part of McKesson) announcement during ANI 2016, they put out some cartoons that look at some of the challenges that continue to plague healthcare. I’m sure they’ll be posting a bunch of them on Twitter @McKesson_MHS and @RelayHealth, but these two really gave me a good laugh.

Healthcare Sticky Notes Cartoon

Don’t underestimate the power of sticky notes!

Healthcare Claims Cleanup Cartoon

Looks like it’s going to be another banner year for HFMA’s ANI conference. It’s a unique venue where so much money is flowing since there’s so much financial waste in healthcare. Don’t believe me? I saw one company advertise that they were giving away a Harley Davidson or $15,000. Chew on the ROI of that investment. Says a lot about the type of deals that are signed at ANI.

Operationalizing Health IT Discoveries

Posted on June 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been talking a lot lately with people about how we take the health IT discoveries made at one hospital and apply them to another hospital. In a recent conversation I had with Jonathan Sheldon from Oracle, he highlighted that “Many organizations don’t care about research, but just want a product that works.”

I agree completely with this comment from Jonathan. While there are some very large healthcare organizations that do a lot of research, there are even more healthcare organizations that just want to see patients in the best way possible. They just want to implement the research that other organizations have done. They just want something that works.

The problem for big companies like Oracle, SAP, Tableau, etc is that they have the technology to scale up many of these health IT discoveries, but they aren’t doing the discovery themselves. In fact, most of them never will dive into the discovery of which healthcare data really matters.

In order to solve this, I’ve seen all of these organizations working on some sort of partnership between IT companies and healthcare research organizations. The IT company provides the technology and the commercialization of the product and the healthcare research organization provides the research knowledge on the most effective techniques.

While this all sounds very simple and logical, it’s actually much harder in practice. Taking your customer and turning them into a partner is much harder than it looks. Most healthcare organizations know how to be customers. It takes a unique healthcare organization to be an effective partner. However, this is exactly what we have to do if we want to operationalize the health IT discoveries these research organizations make.

We’re going to have to make this a reality. There’s no way that one organization can discover everything they need to discover. Healthcare is too complex as it is today. Plus, we’re just getting started with things like genomic medicine and health sensors which is going to make healthcare at least an order of magnitude more complex.

Methods of Data Exchange in Healthcare

Posted on June 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn has a great chart on her Health Populi blog which shows how healthcare shares health data:
Healthcare Data Sharing Methods and Options

The chart is great even if the results are pretty awful. Plus, the data is a little dated. I wonder how those numbers have changed since early 2015.

Amazing that the top 3 forms of data exchange in healthcare were old analogue technologies: paper, information (phone), and fax.

This will come as no surprise to anyone in healthcare. I do find it interesting that the 4th most popular method is scanning the documents directly to the provider. That illustrates that most clinics would love to have an electronic option for sharing data, but there’s not an easier way. The options that are currently available are too hard. If they were easier, then I believe almost every practice would adopt them.

With all the benefits of direct exchanges, HIE, portals, Direct, FHIR, etc, it’s amazing that a simple document scan sent directly to a clinic is more popular. It makes me take a step back and wonder if we’ve over complicated the process of health data exchange.

Would the best option be to step back and make exchange much easier? Could we strip out all the extra features that are nice but impede participation from so many?

I can’t wait for the day that my health data is available wherever it’s needed. The first step to that reality might be taking a step back and simplifying the exchange of data.

Hospitals’ Progress Towards Value Based Reimbursement

Posted on June 17, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

After posting the value based reimbursement research results that were shared by McKesson Health Solutions in anticipation of the AHIP Institute, I came across this infographic from Health Catalyst about hospitals participation in value based reimbursement.

This infographic illustrates a slower adoption of value based reimbursement, but it does illustrate that pretty much every hospital is participating in value based reimbursement. The other thing that stood out to me in this infographic was how small hospitals are going to have a hard time accessing the capital they need to manage this shift. This should be troubling to those of us in healthcare. Those smaller hospitals play an important role in our healthcare system.

Hospitals Progress to Value Based Reimbursement

Creating Alliances with Large Health IT Vendors – Benefits and Challenges

Posted on June 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Scene recently sat down with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) to talk about their alliance with Philips Healthcare and the impact it’s had on their healthcare organization.

Along with talking about the benefits and challenges of creating a long term contract with a healthcare IT vendor, we also dive into the details of how medical device standardization has impacted their organization. Not to be left out, we also talk about how this relationship has impacted patients and doctors. If your organization is looking at how to standardize your medical equipment, this interview will give you some insight into creating a long term alliance with your vendor.

In the second part of my interview with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) we discuss how they’re taking the lessons learned from the Philips alliance and applying them to their agreement with Cerner. We also talk about how cybersecurity is better having a vendor representative on site like they have with Philips.

Are Your Health Data Efforts a Foundation for the Future?

Posted on June 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently was talking with Jonathan Sheldon from Oracle and I was inspired by the idea that today’s data projects could be the essential foundation for future healthcare analytics and care that form what we now call Precision Medicine. Chew on that idea for a minute. There’s a lot of power in the idea of building blocks that open up new avenues for innovation.

How many healthcare ideas have been shot down because “that’s impossible”? Lots of them. Why are so many of these things “impossible”? They’re impossible because there are usually 10-15 things that need to be accomplished to be able to make the impossible possible.

Take healthcare analytics as an example. I once worked with a clinician to do a study on obesity in our patient population. As we started to put together the study it required us to pull all of the charts for patients whose BMI was over a certain level. Since we were on an EHR, I ran the report and the clinician researching the study easily had a list of every patient that met her criteria. Imagine trying to do that study before EHR. Someone would have had to manually go through thousands of paper charts to identify which ones met the criteria. No doubt that study would have been met with the complaint “That’s impossible.” (Remember that too expensive or time consuming is considered impossible for most organizations.)

What I just described was a super simple study. Now take that same concept and apply it beyond studies into things like real time analytics displayed to the provider at the point of care. How do you do that in a paper chart world? That’s right. You don’t even think about it because it’s impossible.

Sometimes we have to take a step back and imagine the building blocks that will be necessary for future innovation. Clean, trusted data is a good foundational building block for that innovation. The future of healthcare is going to be built on the back of health data. Your ability to trust your data is going to be an essential step to ensuring your organization can do the “impossible”.