Free Hospital EMR and EHR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Hospital EMR and EHR for FREE!

Healthcare IT Competitive Landscape Graphic

Posted on May 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently did an interview with a market research firm about healthcare IT and specifically about patient portals. They sent me their final report and in that report they shared a graphic of the competitive landscape for healthcare IT (which they said I could share):

Healthcare IT Competitive Landscape

I’m sure we could quibble over some of the categories they chose, where a company resides (ie. IBM bought Truven Analytics, so they’re now technically one company), companies left off, etc, but I thought it was an interesting overview of the kind of companies that are trying to make an impact in healthcare.

In fact, what hit me most about this graphic was the diversity of companies that have a foothold in healthcare. I’ve certainly heard and worked with all of the companies on the list. However, I’d never really sat back and thought about the breadth of companies that are trying to do something in healthcare.

Of course, when you think about the trillions of dollars being spent on healthcare, it’s not that big of a surprise that these large companies would want a piece of that large pie. In fact, there are a number of other very large companies that are definitely missing from this graphic (no doubt the graphic wasn’t intended to be comprehensive).

I’d love to hear what other categories of companies you think should be represented on the list. Any other category of companies you see working in healthcare?

5 Challenges for Healthcare That Won’t Go Away

Posted on May 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There are some challenges in healthcare that will likely be with us forever. As soon as we think we have our arms around it, it grows or changes. It’s the nature of life and we have to constantly deal with these challenges as healthcare leaders. In a whitepaper titled “Healthcare Ops Management: 5 Trends You Can’t Ignore In 2016” 5 of these challenges are highlighted:
5 Healthcare Challenges
You can download the full whitepaper for free if you want to dive into more detail on each of these 5 challenges. However, it struck me that these 5 challenges are healthcare challenges that likely won’t go away:

  • Patients are Consumers
  • Patient Safety
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Data-Rich Environment
  • Emphasis on Cost Reduction

Think about the list above. Will patients become less consumers? Will patient safety ever become less of a concern? Disasters are only picking up, so will we ever not need to prepared for emergencies? Can anyone imagine healthcare having less data? Would a leader ever say to not worry about cost reduction?

All of these challenges (and likely others) are things that healthcare leaders are going to have to deal with going forward. I wonder how many healthcare CIOs have a plan for how they’re going to prepare their organization for each of these challenges on an ongoing basis. I’m sure many have some point projects, but likely lack an overall vision for each of these areas. A plan for each of these 5 challenges would be a great place to start.

An Acronym Look at MACRA QPP

Posted on April 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The proposed rule for the MACRA program has been announced. Here’s an acronym laden summary of what MACRA did (Worth noting that CHIP is the C in MACRA for those keeping track of acronyms at home).

MACRA creates a QPP.

MACRA ends SGR

MACRA creates two paths: MIPS and APMs.

MIPS and APMs timeline from 2015 through 2021.

MIPS combines PQRS, VM (or VBPM if you prefer), and Medicare EHR (MU and Certified EHR) into 1 program.

APMs include ACOs, PCMH, and bundled payments.

MU is now ACI.

If you’re not sure about some of the acronyms above, you can find their longer names here. Good thing they simplified and streamlined the various programs!

We’ll be becoming friends with the acronyms MIPS and APMs. Here’s a good summary PDF of MACRA as well. More details to come.

UPDATE: In a bit or irony, Andy Slavitt posted this acronym free video about MACRA:

Health IT Software Must Be Meaningful and Pleasurable

Posted on April 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most dynamic healthcare CIO’s is Shafiq Rab, MD, MPH, Vice President and CIO at Hackensack UMC. Healthcare Scene was lucky enough to talk with him at the DataMotion Health booth during HIMSS 2016. Dr. Rab talked with us about Hackensack UMC’s approach to healthcare IT innovation. He offered some great insights into how to approach any healthcare IT project, about Hackensack University Medical Center’s “selfie” app, and their efforts to use Direct and FHIR to empower the patient.

I love that Dr. Rab leads off the discussion with the idea that healthcare IT software that they implement must be meaningful and pleasurable. Far too many health IT software miss these important goals. They aren’t very meaningful and they’re definitely not pleasurable.

Dr. Rab’s focus on the patient is also worth highlighting. Health IT would be in a much better place if there was a great focus on the patient along with making health IT software meaningful and pleasurable. Thanks Dr. Rab and DataMotion Health for doing this interview with us.

The “Feature List” Disconnect from Healthcare Problems

Posted on April 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the big takeaways coming out of the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference is that most health IT companies are still spouting out the features they offer and very few actually talk about the problems they solve. This is a huge mistake for a health IT company, but it’s also a big reason why most hospital executives don’t want to hear from you.

As a healthcare executive you’re inundated with marketing and sales pitches and after a while they all start to look the same. Plus, many (some might say most) of those pitches require the hospital executive to try and translate a long list of features into the problems that executive is trying to solve. It’s no wonder that most hospital executives barely look at these pitches and often aren’t aware of the opportunities for innovation that exist for the problems they’re trying to solve.

Think about how many healthcare IT companies could list the following set of features in their sales and marketing:

  • Data Analytics
  • FHIR Enabled
  • HIPAA Compliant
  • EHR Integration
  • Machine Learning
  • Mobile Optimized
  • Real Time Processing
  • etc

I could keep going on, but you get the point. I’m reminded of something Shahid Shah said at our session at HIMSS. No one in healthcare has an interoperability problem. His point isn’t that interoperability isn’t important or valuable. His point was that no one is trying to solve interoperability. They have other problems they are trying to solve and data sharing (ie. interoperability) might be the solution. However, when they think about their problems and challenges interoperability is not on that list.

Hospital systems definitely have plenty of problems they’re trying to solve. Here’s just a few examples to give you a flavor of problems hospital executives are working to solve:

  • Improving HCAPHS Scores
  • Reducing Hospital Readmissions
  • Improving Provider Efficiency
  • Ensuring Accurate Patient Identification
  • Lowering Sepsis Numbers
  • etc

This list never ends. These are problems that hospital executives are working to solve and understanding which problems are vexing a hospital executive is key to getting them interested in the solutions. I think this small change would make it so hospital executives dread the wave of marketing and sales pitches a little less. The reality is that most of these executives are looking for great solutions. It’s just often hard for them to know what problems your company can really solve.

Of course, the next challenge is showing proof of your ability to solve the problem. However, at least that gets a hospital executive one step closer to finding solutions to their problems and challenges.

The Misconceptions of Social Media in Healthcare

Posted on April 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I came across this blog post on the Cisco blog about an employee’s entry into the world of Twitter and social media. She offers a number of great points that are worthy of highlighting:

  • It’s Not Stupid
  • You Don’t Have to Be All-In
  • Twitter is a Great Equalizer
  • You Be You

This is all some great advice. Except I would argue that some parts of Twitter are stupid. However, that’s true of most things of value. There’s a lot of email in this world that is terribly stupid. That doesn’t diminish the value of email.

Although, as I read through the list, I recognized the real problem with social media is that people have the wrong perception of what social media is and how it can benefit them. Sure, social media can be a marketing tool for your company. Social media can be a way for you to broadcast what you eat and when you sleep and when you see a beautiful pink flower. It literally can be anything you want it to be. However, if you don’t want it to be those things, then it won’t be those things.

Twitter is literally what you make of it. If you want it to be about food, then you can follow the kind of people that post about food. If you want to enjoy pictures of flowers, then you can find someone who posts pictures of flowers. However, if those topics don’t interest you, then don’t follow those types of accounts. On just my @techguy account I’m somewhere around 22,696 tweets in and I can only remember 3-4 pictures that included food ever. There might be a flower picture in there somewhere, but it’s likely in the background.

Of course, if you don’t care about healthcare IT, then you probably don’t want to follow me either. I’ve sent a lot of tweets about healthcare IT and had a lot of conversations with people about EHR. The point is that if there’s a topic you enjoy or a topic that’s needed for your work, you’ll find it on social media and on Twitter. Sure, there’s plenty of other junk, but you really won’t see it if you’re following the right people. Plus, if you get the random food picture, I can promise you that it won’t hurt you. In fact, some randomness is part of the fun of Twitter.

So far I’ve really only talked about social media consumption. That’s the beauty of social media as well. There’s no requirement that you ever actually broadcast anything yourself. More and more people are just using social media for content curation and education. They never send a tweet. They don’t know what a retweet or favorite is. They don’t DM. They don’t use hashtags. They just consume the social media others create.

While I think there’s some missed value if all you’re doing is consuming content and not interacting on social media, that doesn’t mean there’s not a lot of value available on social media even if all you’re doing is consuming. It can be incredibly valuable. You can learn a lot to help your career. You can learn a lot about people. You can learn a lot about a company or your competitor. There’s so much value that can be obtained through simply consuming information shared on social media.

With that said, the blogger linked at the top of this post is right. Social media is the great equalizer. This is especially true if you’re a nobody at a small company. How many times do you get an audience with the CEO of your company. Probably not very much. However, on social media you have the open opportunity for them to see what you’re doing and you to engage them on topics that matter to you. Much of this can happen naturally. Just be yourself and you’ll be surprised how effective that can be.

Of course, like I’ve always said. Not everyone should do social media, but everyone could benefit from using social media. However, don’t let the misconceptions of what social media “is” deter you from trying it out and seeing where and how it can provide value. You can make it work for you.

Looking Into the Future of Hospital EHR

Posted on April 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about where the world of hospital EHR software is going to head. At the top of the market we have Cerner and Epic taking most of the share. As we go down the market we see a lot of other large players, but we still only have 20 or so EHR vendors playing in the hospital EHR world.

In the last year we’ve seen aggressive moves by athenahealth and eCW to enter the hospital EHR space as well after previously only providing ambulatory EHR software. I’ve heard predictions that entrants like these are going to charge significantly less for their EHR software and that’s going to really shake up the market. You can imagine how the discussions in most hospitals will go if there’s an EHR alternative that’s 1/10th the price of their current EHR.

What’s interesting is that I haven’t seen any major moves by the large competitors to really accelerate the services, features, and functions they provide a hospital in order to justify the large premium. If I were Epic or Cerner, I’d be thinking about something really special that we could create that would be cost prohibitive for these new entrants to create. No doubt the Innovator’s Dilemma is at play here. Hard to fight against so much proven history around business dynamics.

Something that’s shocking to me is that these new entrants into the hospital EHR space aren’t really leveraging new technology either. They’re not building new features or functionality that doesn’t exist today (for the most part). They’re using things like cloud and mobile that are now relatively old technologies, but haven’t been applied to healthcare.

Said another way, will doctors love this new breed of hospital EHR any more than the current breed? I believe the answer to that question is no. Doctors will hate this new breed of EHR just as much. With this insight, I could imagine some other companies coming along and creating true innovation with new technologies that today we can’t even imagine. Although, it won’t likely be just technology innovation, but in healthcare it will likely include business model innovation as well.

EHR Ratings – GomerBlog Style

Posted on April 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I first saw this tweet without the image and wondered what the GomerBlog had done for April Fool’s day. I also wondered how I’d missed it on that day. Turns out that the above image and the corresponding blog post on the GomberBlog was definitely not on April Fool’s day, but on March 26th. Although, some might say that the GomerBlog celebrates April Fool’s all year round. For those not familiar with it, they’re basically the Onion of healthcare.

I had to laugh at the ratings they posted. The should have added another column to the chart “Vendor’s Take” and had them all say “Fantastic!” as well.

Dean Sittig is right in his tweet though that this chart isn’t far from the truth. Things that are close to the truth make for the best humor. However, if you’re a doctor or nurse using an EHR, it’s likely getting less and less funny.

Also, for those searching for EHR ratings, good luck. There are so many reasons that EHR ratings are a challenge to do. I’d be careful trusting any rating system out there.

Accessing Near Real Time Patient Data In & Out of the Hospital with Alan Portela

Posted on April 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Scene recently sad down with Alan Portela, CEO of AirStrip to talk about the shifting world of real time access to healthcare data in and out of the hospital. We cover a lot of ground including AirStrip’s experience being on stage at the announcement of the Apple Watch, the challenge of EHR data interoperability, and the amazing work that AirStrip is doing to make near real time health data available on devices across healthcare. Enjoy the recorded video interview with Alan Portela below:

In the “after party” discussion, we continue the discussion and are joined by Jimmie Legan, MD and Charles Webster, MD.

Value Based Care Hurting Most Vulnerable Hospitals

Posted on March 25, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In an article by the Washington Examiner, they highlight an interesting impact of the shift to value based reimbursement on hospitals:

Safety-net hospitals are getting hit by Obamacare’s push to penalize poor quality, the latest evidence of problems with the law’s effort to improve quality of care.

A new study from Harvard Medical School found that safety-net hospitals that treat many low-income or uninsured individuals are being penalized more for hospital readmission rates than other hospitals.

If a hospital readmits too many patients 30 days after they are discharged after being treated for a certain condition, that hospital gets penalized. A hospital could receive up to a 3 percent reduction in its Medicare annual patient payments.

The policy, which started in 2011, a year after Obamacare was passed, is intended to address a quality issue at hospitals. It is part of a larger shift in Obamacare to transition Medicare payments away from traditional fees for service toward a new model that rewards quality care.

We saw something similar to this happen during meaningful use as well. The most vulnerable hospitals couldn’t get the EHR incentive money because the incentive money wasn’t enough to cover the entire costs of the EHR. So, they just went without. In fact, an argument could be made that a large portion of the meaningful use EHR incentive money was paid to hospitals that were already on the path to EHR, but that’s a topic for another day.

When it comes to value based reimbursement it takes the right investment in technology and processes to be successful. I know a lot of hospitals that are just trying to keep their doors open. Where does that leave them time to think about these new complex government regulations? No doubt this shift to value based reimbursement is going to cause a lot of them to close their doors or be merged into the larger hospital systems. In fact, the later has been happening for a while and will continue to accelerate.

The article above does suggest a possible solution:

One alternative would have a hospital be measured by how its readmission rate improves rather than whether it meets a national average.

“Hospitals could be rewarded based on improvements off what their prior performance has been,” Barnett said.

Another alternative is for a hospital to become an accountable care organization. The concept gives a hospital a spending growth target that it has to meet for its Medicare patients.

I like the idea of benchmarking, but that can get really messy really quickly. The more I learn about value based reimbursement the more I worry that we’re just making things more complex without actually solving healthcare’s core problems.