Free Hospital EMR and EHR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Hospital EMR and EHR for FREE!

How Much Time Do You Spend Cleaning Your Data?

Posted on June 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently came across this really great blog post talking about data scientists wasting their time. Here’s a quote from the article (which quotes the NYT):

“Data scientists, according to interviews and expert estimates, spend 50 percent to 80 percent of their time mired in [the] mundane labor of collecting and preparing unruly digital data, before it can be explored for useful nuggets.”
– Steve Lohr, NYT

Then, they have this extraordinary quote from Monica Rogati, VP for Data Science at Jawbone:

“Data scientists are forced to act more like data janitors than actual scientists.”

Every data scientist will tell you this is a problem. They spend far too much time cleaning up the data and they all wish they could spend more time actually looking at the data to find insights. I’ve seen this all over health care. In fact, I’d say we have more data janitors than data scientists in healthcare. Sadly, many healthcare data projects clean up the data and then don’t have any budget left to actually do something with the data.

The solution to this problem is easy to write and much harder to do. The solution is to create an expectation and a culture of clean data in your organization.

I predict that over the next 5-10 years, healthcare data is going to become the backbone of healthcare data decision making. Those organizations that houses are a mess are going to be torn down and sold off to the hospital that’s kept a clean house. Is your hospital data clean or dirty?

The Next Big Healthcare IT Brands

Posted on June 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed it, I wrote a post on EMR and HIPAA that talks about how patients will choose healthcare. In the article we talk about the impact of brand on healthcare decision making. Plus, I talk a bit about how many real national healthcare brands there are in the industry.

With this in mind, I was struck by this tweet from @theEHRGuy:

As the post above illustrates, I’d considered the impact of brand on healthcare decision making by patients. I hadn’t thought about the power of brand for healthcare IT companies. Over the past couple of years, we’ve definitely seen how important brand has been as many hospitals have chosen to buy from the brand as opposed to taking a best of breed approach to their IT systems. This has been an extremely important trend in healthcare IT.

In my recent post, I also talked about the move away from Best of Breed EHR systems and how that could apply to patient engagement solutions as well. I think this cycle is inevitable and I think patient engagement could be an area where a big brand establishes their name in the industry. Especially because the incumbent EHRs aren’t competing well in the patient engagement space.

I’ve also written about how I think that the Care Management System could be the next system purchase now that we’ve done HIS/PM and EHR. Could someone or a group of companies build a great brand for Care Management Systems? Could they build momentum around the need for every hospital to invest in some sort of Care Management System the way there’s been momentum for hospitals to adopt EHR?

Back to the tweet embedded above, I think it’s pretty interesting to think about the next big healthcare IT brands. Which brands do you think are going to be the next big ones? Every hospital CIO should be spending some time thinking about and watching these trends.

Healthcare IT Jobs – The Move from Consultant to FTE

Posted on June 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In hospital IT we’re seeing a lot of changes happening with how a hospital IT department staffs itself. The past couple years, most hospitals have been busy implementing their EHR. This required them to hire a lot of EHR consulting companies that could scale up their manpower requirements for the implementation. In fact, many of these so called EHR consulting companies were actually just staff augmentation companies dressed as consultants. I even noted that the Healthcare IT Industry was addicted to consultants.

I think over the last 6 or so months, we’ve seen a move away from hiring as many consultants (we still love a good consultant) towards hiring more FTEs in hospital IT. This makes sense. As the EHR product has matured, the manpower needs are more stable and so it makes a lot of sense to hire a full time person to manage the ongoing needs.

We’ve seen that first hand on our healthcare IT job board. There are still some lingering consulting positions that are needed for the remaining EHR implementations, but hospitals are hiring more FTEs. I think this trend will continue for a good while to come.

In fact, we’re seeing a shift in consulting. Many EHR consulting companies are turning into EHR help desks. Others are going after value based reimbursement and healthcare analytics. In some cases, the consulting companies are turning into product companies. In other cases, they’re finally starting to consult.

Best of Breed in Patient Engagement?

Posted on June 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I’ve been thinking more about the future of healthcare IT, I wrote that I think the next major healthcare IT product could be a Care Management System. Maybe it will go by a different name, but the functionality that’s described by a care management system is already going into place. Regulations are headed that direction and every organization will need to have a care management system.

At the core of a care management system will be functionality that engages the patient. I use that term in the broadest sense possible and not the fully corrupted meaningful use version of patient engagement. I’m talking about truly engaging the patient in their care in a bi-directional way that includes communication, support, education, social influence, and more.

As I consider the broad possibilities around patient engagement, there are hundreds of companies (possibly thousands) working in this space. Some are working with diabetic patients while others are focused on cardiac issues. Others are using text messages while some startups are leveraging full smart phone applications. A few tie in with the EHR vendors and many don’t. A hospital system is going to need a patient engagement solution that cuts across all of these slices.

With that in mind, it begs the question, “Are we going to implement and manage a cobbled together “best of breed” solution for patient engagement?

If EHR history tells us anything, most hospitals will adopt some point patient engagement solutions and then over time they’ll realize that the best of breed approach to patient engagement has gotten unwieldy and they’ll start looking for an all in one patient engagement solution. In some ways, this has to be the path forward. There’s no all in one patient engagement solution today. So, hospital systems have to choose to either sit on the sideline and wait for the all in one system to arrive (like many did with EHR software) or they have to go best of breed to start while the all in one patient engagement solutions come together.

I’m not sure this path is such a bad thing. It’s good for a health system to understand patient engagement in a smaller way before expanding across the entire system. We’re starting to see more of this happen in hospitals. However, be sure to keep your eye on the long game being one unified patient engagement system.

Moving from the Era of Push to the Era of Pull for Healthcare Data

Posted on June 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought this image and comment were really interesting in the context of healthcare data. Healthcare data has generally been stuck in the push era. I’m excited to see the discussion expanding to the pull era. It’s a very different world when you can just pull the healthcare data you want when you need it. The above conference is from a medical imaging conference. Are they leading the way with pull data in healthcare?

We’re Entering the 15th Year of Our EHR Implementation

Posted on June 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently talking to someone about a major progressive hospital system that’s been using technology and EHR for a long time. This person then told me that it felt like this hospital system was in its 15th year of its EHR implementation.

I’m sure that most hospital organizations can relate to this statement. Each hospital system will replace the number of years with a different number, but I think every hospital probably believes that their EHR implementation is never complete. Certainly you might have a go live event with the initial installation of the software, but that’s far from a fully implemented EHR system.

This concept reminds me of two things we’ve talked about before. The first is a controversial post I did called The Tyranny of “Time” – EHR Efficiency Has a Lifecycle. I put up a chart which I think illustrates an important lesson about the lifecycle of an EHR implementation and many disagreed with the chart. I still stand behind the principle that time has a way of eroding even the best EHR implementation. So, you better have a long term plan to deal with the Tyranny of Time.

The second is a comment from a hospital CIO who made a comment on one of my posts many years ago. In the post I’d commented about how we’d implemented a new practice EHR in about 2 weeks time frame. The doctor was opening his practice in 2 weeks and so we literally crunched in the entire EHR implementation and purchasing process into those 2 weeks so they didn’t have to start on paper charts. The Hospital CIO’s comment on that article was “You lost me at 2 weeks EHR implementation.” Of course, this was an EHR implementation at a solo practice.

Although, even in the case of a small ambulatory practice, the EHR implementation is never done. At hospitals there’s always more that can be done to improve how you use your EHR. I don’t think it’s a bad thing to think that you’re in your XX year of your EHR implementation. As long as you still create milestones so that staff feel the sense of accomplishment in the process.

Susannah Fox Named As First Woman CTO of HHS

Posted on May 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you’ve been busy like me, this week Susannah Fox was named as the new CTO of HHS. She’s the first woman to be appointed to this position and is following in the footsteps of Todd Park (who later became the US CTO) and Bryan Sivak.

The HHS CTO position was started in 2009 and so it’s a relatively new position, but I think it’s exciting that HHS would choose Susannah Fox for this position. Fox has worked as the associate director of the Pew Research Center and as the entrepreneur in residence at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Those of us on social media know @SusannahFox very well since she was very active on Twitter and often joined in on various healthcare IT discussions that were happening online. Plus, Susannah Fox was a regular speaker at healthcare IT events.

What I love most about the prospect of Susannah Fox being involved at HHS is that she’s a total health data geek. I say that with the utmost respect and admiration. In fact, I don’t throw compliments like that out easily. She’s a true data geek that’s been diving into healthcare data for a long time. I think that’s going to be a very valuable quality in her new role at HHS.

Maybe I’m wrong, but I think that one of HHS’ major roles should be around using data to improve healthcare in the US. I think that’s the potential opportunity for them and one that they haven’t done a great job leveraging to date. I’m hopeful that Susannah Fox will be able to help in that regard.

Think about all the powerful women at the head of HHS: Sylvia Burwell, Karen DeSalvo, and now Susannah Fox (and I’m sure there are many more that I don’t know as well). I think that’s a great thing. I look forward to the future they’re paving. They don’t have an easy job ahead, but I do think they have tremendous opportunity.

8 Things the Hospital Website of the Future Will Include

Posted on May 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Wall Street Journal has an article that talks about what the hospital website of the future will look like. In the article, the writer offers these 8 suggestions for what a hospital website will include in the next 10 years:

  1. Real-time patient reviews and observations
  2. Quality ratings
  3. Your protected medical record
  4. Literally see a clinician, right now
  5. Advanced help with medications
  6. Prices
  7. Consumer specials
  8. Food ratings

The only one I’d really argue with is the quality ratings item. I think that measuring quality is a really challenging thing and I’m not sure anyone will do it well enough that hospitals will be publishing those ratings on their website.

What’s more important about this list is that almost every one of them could be implemented in a hospital today. There is nothing on the list is not easily achieved technically. A few of them have some financial challenges like “literally see a clinician, right now”, but many in telemedicine are working on that as well.

If I were to describe these changes, I’d suggest that the shift you see described is one of a website that looks to engage the patient versus today’s hospital website which generally tries to not engage the patient. This will be a welcome shift for patients and a major culture shift for hospitals.

Could Vendors Create Interoperability Retroactively If the Government Passed a Mandate?

Posted on May 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In response to Anne Zieger’s post titled “HHS’ $30B Interoperability Mistake“, Richard Schmitz sent out this tweet:

Then, Anne Zieger responded with an intriguing question:

While I don’t think we should peg all the blame on the EHR vendors (many hospitals didn’t want interoperability either), there have been good economic reasons not to be interoperable. Anne’s question is a good one: “Could vendors create interoperability retroactively if the government passed a mandate?”

I think the question is simple: Absolutely.

If EHR vendors had to be interoperable, they would do it. In fact, most EHR vendors have already solved the technical challenges. In some limited areas they’re already sharing data. The problems of healthcare interoperability are not technical, but all financial and political.

I’m hopeful that ACOs and value based reimbursement will push healthcare interoperability to the forefront. However, that will still be a long haul before it’s a reality. What do you think? If there was a mandate would EHRs be able to be interoperable?

ICD-10 Poll

Posted on May 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently saw an ICD-10 survey that looked at ambulatory preparedness for ICD-10. That survey highlighted a number of ICD-10 business areas of concern that are worth considering in hospitals as well:

  • Training/Education
  • Payer Tersting
  • Software Upgrade Cost
  • Claims Processing
  • Compliance Timeline/Deadline

If your hospital hasn’t considered these areas of ICD-10 readiness, then you might want to start doing so now.

Of course, I’m interested to know what people think about ICD-10. Will it get delayed again? Will it finally go forward? Let’s hear what you think in the poll below.

My personal feeling is that if I’m running a hospital, I’m going to have to act like ICD-10 is going forward and plan accordingly. I don’t want to be caught unprepared because I was holding out hope that it would be delayed again. What do you think? Is that wise advice for hospitals?