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Operationalizing Health IT Discoveries

Posted on June 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been talking a lot lately with people about how we take the health IT discoveries made at one hospital and apply them to another hospital. In a recent conversation I had with Jonathan Sheldon from Oracle, he highlighted that “Many organizations don’t care about research, but just want a product that works.”

I agree completely with this comment from Jonathan. While there are some very large healthcare organizations that do a lot of research, there are even more healthcare organizations that just want to see patients in the best way possible. They just want to implement the research that other organizations have done. They just want something that works.

The problem for big companies like Oracle, SAP, Tableau, etc is that they have the technology to scale up many of these health IT discoveries, but they aren’t doing the discovery themselves. In fact, most of them never will dive into the discovery of which healthcare data really matters.

In order to solve this, I’ve seen all of these organizations working on some sort of partnership between IT companies and healthcare research organizations. The IT company provides the technology and the commercialization of the product and the healthcare research organization provides the research knowledge on the most effective techniques.

While this all sounds very simple and logical, it’s actually much harder in practice. Taking your customer and turning them into a partner is much harder than it looks. Most healthcare organizations know how to be customers. It takes a unique healthcare organization to be an effective partner. However, this is exactly what we have to do if we want to operationalize the health IT discoveries these research organizations make.

We’re going to have to make this a reality. There’s no way that one organization can discover everything they need to discover. Healthcare is too complex as it is today. Plus, we’re just getting started with things like genomic medicine and health sensors which is going to make healthcare at least an order of magnitude more complex.

Methods of Data Exchange in Healthcare

Posted on June 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn has a great chart on her Health Populi blog which shows how healthcare shares health data:
Healthcare Data Sharing Methods and Options

The chart is great even if the results are pretty awful. Plus, the data is a little dated. I wonder how those numbers have changed since early 2015.

Amazing that the top 3 forms of data exchange in healthcare were old analogue technologies: paper, information (phone), and fax.

This will come as no surprise to anyone in healthcare. I do find it interesting that the 4th most popular method is scanning the documents directly to the provider. That illustrates that most clinics would love to have an electronic option for sharing data, but there’s not an easier way. The options that are currently available are too hard. If they were easier, then I believe almost every practice would adopt them.

With all the benefits of direct exchanges, HIE, portals, Direct, FHIR, etc, it’s amazing that a simple document scan sent directly to a clinic is more popular. It makes me take a step back and wonder if we’ve over complicated the process of health data exchange.

Would the best option be to step back and make exchange much easier? Could we strip out all the extra features that are nice but impede participation from so many?

I can’t wait for the day that my health data is available wherever it’s needed. The first step to that reality might be taking a step back and simplifying the exchange of data.

Hospitals’ Progress Towards Value Based Reimbursement

Posted on June 17, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

After posting the value based reimbursement research results that were shared by McKesson Health Solutions in anticipation of the AHIP Institute, I came across this infographic from Health Catalyst about hospitals participation in value based reimbursement.

This infographic illustrates a slower adoption of value based reimbursement, but it does illustrate that pretty much every hospital is participating in value based reimbursement. The other thing that stood out to me in this infographic was how small hospitals are going to have a hard time accessing the capital they need to manage this shift. This should be troubling to those of us in healthcare. Those smaller hospitals play an important role in our healthcare system.

Hospitals Progress to Value Based Reimbursement

Creating Alliances with Large Health IT Vendors – Benefits and Challenges

Posted on June 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Scene recently sat down with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) to talk about their alliance with Philips Healthcare and the impact it’s had on their healthcare organization.

Along with talking about the benefits and challenges of creating a long term contract with a healthcare IT vendor, we also dive into the details of how medical device standardization has impacted their organization. Not to be left out, we also talk about how this relationship has impacted patients and doctors. If your organization is looking at how to standardize your medical equipment, this interview will give you some insight into creating a long term alliance with your vendor.

In the second part of my interview with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) we discuss how they’re taking the lessons learned from the Philips alliance and applying them to their agreement with Cerner. We also talk about how cybersecurity is better having a vendor representative on site like they have with Philips.

Are Your Health Data Efforts a Foundation for the Future?

Posted on June 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently was talking with Jonathan Sheldon from Oracle and I was inspired by the idea that today’s data projects could be the essential foundation for future healthcare analytics and care that form what we now call Precision Medicine. Chew on that idea for a minute. There’s a lot of power in the idea of building blocks that open up new avenues for innovation.

How many healthcare ideas have been shot down because “that’s impossible”? Lots of them. Why are so many of these things “impossible”? They’re impossible because there are usually 10-15 things that need to be accomplished to be able to make the impossible possible.

Take healthcare analytics as an example. I once worked with a clinician to do a study on obesity in our patient population. As we started to put together the study it required us to pull all of the charts for patients whose BMI was over a certain level. Since we were on an EHR, I ran the report and the clinician researching the study easily had a list of every patient that met her criteria. Imagine trying to do that study before EHR. Someone would have had to manually go through thousands of paper charts to identify which ones met the criteria. No doubt that study would have been met with the complaint “That’s impossible.” (Remember that too expensive or time consuming is considered impossible for most organizations.)

What I just described was a super simple study. Now take that same concept and apply it beyond studies into things like real time analytics displayed to the provider at the point of care. How do you do that in a paper chart world? That’s right. You don’t even think about it because it’s impossible.

Sometimes we have to take a step back and imagine the building blocks that will be necessary for future innovation. Clean, trusted data is a good foundational building block for that innovation. The future of healthcare is going to be built on the back of health data. Your ability to trust your data is going to be an essential step to ensuring your organization can do the “impossible”.

HIMSS Social Media Ambassador Debate: FHIR and Patient Focus

Posted on June 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at HIMSS, I had a chance to do a “debate” with my good friend, partner and fellow HIMSS Social Media Ambassador, Shahid Shah. This was facilitated by Healthcare IT News, and the debate was moderated by Beth Jones Sanborn, Managing Editor of Healthcare Finance. Shahid and I had a good debate on the topics of healthcare interoperability and FHIR. Plus, we talked about the need for healthcare IT companies to focus on the patient and whether they deserve the bad rap they get or not. Enjoy the video debate below:
Read more..

Why Remote Patient Monitoring and Treatment Is So Important to Healthcare

Posted on May 31, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

When you think about healthcare, you often think of a visit to a doctor’s office or hospital. No doubt that is healthcare as we know it today, but that’s quickly changing. Doctors and hospitals need to wake up to the new healthcare world where you’re paid to keep patients healthy as opposed to treating the chief complaint.

It’s not surprising that we do a poor job managing patients’ health when you consider how much time our current healthcare providers get to spend with the patient. Most patient visits are between 15-30 minutes. In fact, one study showed that doctors see a patient every 11 minutes on average.

Let’s be generous and say that each one of us spends 15 minutes with a doctor once a month and that’s likely being generous for most of us that are even relatively healthy. My simple math says that would add up to us spending about 180 minutes (3 hours) each year with our doctor. There are 8760 hours in a year and so that means we spend about 0.0342% of our life with our doctor each year.

Is it any wonder that our doctors only have time to treat our chief complaint and can’t really help us be and remain healthy when they see us so little?

This simple analysis is why remote patient monitoring is so important to healthcare. We spend exponentially more time outside of our current healthcare system than we do in it. Our understanding of what happens outside the hospital and doctor’s office must change if we’re going to make a dent in the trillions of dollars we spend on healthcare.

The great thing is that we’re starting to see a reinvention of health care with things like mobile medical apps. Previous to the smartphone, how would you have monitored a patient remotely? Sure, we had some bluetooth connected devices that we sent home and people attached to their computers, but that was always cumbersome and fraught with technical challenges. Now we have an always on, always connected device that’s nearly attached to most of us at all times. Many of these devices even come with built-in health sensors. These devices are making remote patient monitoring possible

I don’t fault doctors for not really treating the entire patient in the past. First, they performed the services they were paid to provide. They weren’t paid or given the time to treat the whole patient. Second, the technology wasn’t available for them to scale their remote patient monitoring and treatment efforts. However, we’re seeing both of these things changing as we speak.

Now that I’ve made the case for remote patient monitoring and treatment, what technologies and approaches have you seen be most successful in this space?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Healthcare IT Competitive Landscape Graphic

Posted on May 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently did an interview with a market research firm about healthcare IT and specifically about patient portals. They sent me their final report and in that report they shared a graphic of the competitive landscape for healthcare IT (which they said I could share):

Healthcare IT Competitive Landscape

I’m sure we could quibble over some of the categories they chose, where a company resides (ie. IBM bought Truven Analytics, so they’re now technically one company), companies left off, etc, but I thought it was an interesting overview of the kind of companies that are trying to make an impact in healthcare.

In fact, what hit me most about this graphic was the diversity of companies that have a foothold in healthcare. I’ve certainly heard and worked with all of the companies on the list. However, I’d never really sat back and thought about the breadth of companies that are trying to do something in healthcare.

Of course, when you think about the trillions of dollars being spent on healthcare, it’s not that big of a surprise that these large companies would want a piece of that large pie. In fact, there are a number of other very large companies that are definitely missing from this graphic (no doubt the graphic wasn’t intended to be comprehensive).

I’d love to hear what other categories of companies you think should be represented on the list. Any other category of companies you see working in healthcare?

5 Challenges for Healthcare That Won’t Go Away

Posted on May 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There are some challenges in healthcare that will likely be with us forever. As soon as we think we have our arms around it, it grows or changes. It’s the nature of life and we have to constantly deal with these challenges as healthcare leaders. In a whitepaper titled “Healthcare Ops Management: 5 Trends You Can’t Ignore In 2016” 5 of these challenges are highlighted:
5 Healthcare Challenges
You can download the full whitepaper for free if you want to dive into more detail on each of these 5 challenges. However, it struck me that these 5 challenges are healthcare challenges that likely won’t go away:

  • Patients are Consumers
  • Patient Safety
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Data-Rich Environment
  • Emphasis on Cost Reduction

Think about the list above. Will patients become less consumers? Will patient safety ever become less of a concern? Disasters are only picking up, so will we ever not need to prepared for emergencies? Can anyone imagine healthcare having less data? Would a leader ever say to not worry about cost reduction?

All of these challenges (and likely others) are things that healthcare leaders are going to have to deal with going forward. I wonder how many healthcare CIOs have a plan for how they’re going to prepare their organization for each of these challenges on an ongoing basis. I’m sure many have some point projects, but likely lack an overall vision for each of these areas. A plan for each of these 5 challenges would be a great place to start.

An Acronym Look at MACRA QPP

Posted on April 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The proposed rule for the MACRA program has been announced. Here’s an acronym laden summary of what MACRA did (Worth noting that CHIP is the C in MACRA for those keeping track of acronyms at home).

MACRA creates a QPP.

MACRA ends SGR

MACRA creates two paths: MIPS and APMs.

MIPS and APMs timeline from 2015 through 2021.

MIPS combines PQRS, VM (or VBPM if you prefer), and Medicare EHR (MU and Certified EHR) into 1 program.

APMs include ACOs, PCMH, and bundled payments.

MU is now ACI.

If you’re not sure about some of the acronyms above, you can find their longer names here. Good thing they simplified and streamlined the various programs!

We’ll be becoming friends with the acronyms MIPS and APMs. Here’s a good summary PDF of MACRA as well. More details to come.

UPDATE: In a bit or irony, Andy Slavitt posted this acronym free video about MACRA: