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Image Showing Tug of War Between Providers and Healthcare Execs

Posted on May 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you haven’t noticed I’ve been struck by images lately. We’ve done a lot of humor, but this image shared by Medfusion tells a very different story. Take a look.

Of course, I think this is just a stock image that they must have found. It really does illustrate well the tug of war that exists in many hospitals. I’m sure that those reading this blog know this tug of war all too well. There are exceptions where everyone is rowing together, but a lot of times the providers and the healthcare execs are pulling each other different directions.

In some ways this is good if there’s a good balance between the two. Both priorities are important. If the healthcare execs can’t run a good business, then the hospital will close up shop. That’s not good for anyone. If the doctors can’t ensure quality care to patients, then that’s bad for patients and business long term.

I think the girl in the scrubs that I think might be portraying a nurse doesn’t seem that into the battle. I think that’s true in many hospitals where the nurses aren’t listened to enough and so many of them stop fighting. It’s a pity since when I think of all my hospital visits, I think of the nurses.

I’m sure I could go on about this picture. It’s really well done. I wonder what it takes to get everyone pulling in the same direction?

Big Data Cartoon for Healthcare – Fun Friday

Posted on May 1, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Does this resonate with any of you? Do you have a bunch of big data in your hospitals that you’ve been collecting and you’re not sure what you’re doing with all that data?

I once heard Dana Sellers from Encore Health Resources ask the question, “What could we do with just the meaningful use data?” I think framing the use of data in that way is quite interesting.

EHR Implementation Infographic

Posted on April 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Is this EHR implementation infographic no longer needed? Or are we about to enter a new EHR switching market where EHR implementation information is going to become really important?

I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.
EHR Implementation Infographic

Overcapacity in Inpatient Business

Posted on April 28, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent conversation I had with Bill Anderson, Chairman and CEO of Medhost, he made this really insightful observation, “We have overcapacity in the inpatient business.”

I’m sure there are some exceptions in certain areas, but I believe that Bill is right about the healthcare system on the whole. We have overcapacity in the inpatient business. Unlike other businesses, where you want to drive more demand for a product or service, healthcare is somewhat unique in that we want to try and continue to decrease demand for healthcare services that a hospital provides.

This reminds me of all the people that say, “we need to cut costs in healthcare.” The numbers are clear that the US pays too much for the results we’re getting and that the costs of healthcare are a major problem for the US budget and for many large corporations budgets as well. It’s clear why we need to drive healthcare costs down. However, what they don’t say is that lower cost healthcare means that someone is getting paid less. This someone is often the hospitals.

One way you could look at all these efforts to decrease the cost of healthcare is that they are decreasing the demand for the inpatient business. If we have an overcapacity in inpatient healthcare already, these cost cutting measures will likely increase the overcapacity problem even more.

Those aren’t the only things that are driving down the demand for inpatient services. ACOs and value based care will drive the demand for inpatient services down even farther. High deductible plans will force patients to not do inpatient services that they would have done in the past. All of this will work to accentuate the overcapacity problem in inpatient healthcare.

How does a hospital combat the overcapacity problem? One idea is through digital differentiation. In some areas hospitals have a monopoly on services, but even they are competing with the hospital the next town over (even if it’s a 3 hour drive). However, the majority of healthcare organizations work in an environment that is incredibly competitive. Could unique digital services help a hospital be in more demand from patients than their competitors?

Hospitals are going to be around for as long as I’m alive. There’s certain services they offer that you can’t get other places. However, the demand for the services they offer is going to drastically change. How are you approaching this change in demand? Do digital services offer one solution to this problem?

Healthcare Interoperability Pain Points Infographic

Posted on April 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During HIMSS15, MedeAnalytics surveyed over 1,000 attendees on what their biggest pain points with interoperability and found that vendor incompatibility topped the responses. Here’s a breakdown of the barriers:

  • Vendor incompatibility (55%)
  • Budget (18%)
  • Internal resources (16%)
  • Lack of innovation (12%)

They also put out this infographic with the results of the healthcare interoperability survey:
HIMSS Interoperability Pain Point Infographic

Fun Friday Hospital Humor

Posted on April 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought it would be fun this Friday to share a little humor. Of course, as is usually the case with the best humor, it might hit a little too close to home for some people.

I’m sure nothing like this ever happens in your hospitals.

John Oliver Nails the Patents Discussion

Posted on April 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long had an issue with patents. On the one hand, I agree that we need to protect someone’s efforts to invent something. On the other hand, I’ve seen patent trolls that literally use patents to stifle innovation and put companies out of business. If you aren’t familiar with what’s happening, watch the video of John Oliver below where he describes the patent problem so well.

As more and more hospitals invest in commercializing their research this discussion is going to be very important for these hospitals. It will be interesting to see how this discussion evolves over time. Not to mention the legislation around patents.

Will Health Systems Own Healthcare?

Posted on April 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In all of my many conversations this past week, there was an underlying understanding that health systems are getting bigger and bigger. The trends of hospitals acquiring other hospitals is having a major impact on healthcare. Hospitals acquiring ambulatory clinics is probably having an even bigger impact.

As I ponder on this trend, I really can’t imagine a way that we return to the previous status quo. Certainly some doctors will tire of being employed by health systems, but I’m sad to say that once they’re ready to leave they may not find many doors available for them to take.

Aside from a limited number of direct primary care doctors in affluent areas, I believe it’s going to become extremely difficult for a doctor to leave a health system. In some areas, this is already the case. However, value based reimbursement is going to make this an impossibility for many.

I don’t think we know all the unintended consequences of this change in healthcare. As a capitalist, I love economies of scale and you can see how healthcare could benefit from some of these economies. However, what isn’t clear to me is that health systems do a great job capitalizing on economies of scale. In fact, I bet if you studied it you’d probably find that small physician practices run much cheaper than a large health system. If someone knows of a study that looks at this, I’d love to see it.

I do think that some specialists are bonding together in some areas to create super groups in order to combat this trend. In many ways they essentially create a monopoly of sorts around a certain specialty physician service in a local area. I’ll be interested to see how this plays out. Might be a short term win, but I’m not sure they can survive long term.

I’m still chewing on all the ways that we’ll benefit and suffer in a health system owned healthcare system. I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments on these trends and the impact for good and bad of these changes.

Where Are All the Doctors at HIMSS15?

Posted on April 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I think about the past week in Chicago at HIMSS 2015, I’m wondering where all of the doctors are at HIMSS. Yes, I know there are actually quite a few doctors at HIMSS, but the vast majority of them are now administrators or are working for vendors. There are very few practicing doctors at HIMSS. It’s really quite unfortunate, because their voice is so important to everything that we’re doing.

I know why many doctors don’t go to HIMSS. I’ve seen multiple times where a practicing doctor comes to HIMSS and they’re overwhelmed by the disconnect between what’s being spouted by vendors and what they’re experiencing in their daily work. Most of them say, “I’m never coming back.” It’s really sad for me when this happens, but it also provides us with an opportunity to keep what’s said at HIMSS in perspective.

I wish that HIMSS would work to resolve this problem since having many practicing doctors at HIMSS would really elevate the quality of the conference. I realize that it’s hard to get a busy doctor to leave for a few days where they’re not making any money. However, with some effort and creativity they could make it a reality.

For example, they could create some sort of physician scholarship program that would help encourage more doctors to come. They could reach out to the doctors in the local area to get them to come and participate in the event. They could offer a number of quality CME options since we know that doctors need CMEs.

HIMSS has a ton of value for a large number of groups. In fact, many people have argued that HIMSS has grown so large that it needs to be divided into a number of different conferences. I don’t share that view since I like the mixing of various parts of healthcare, but HIMSS has become pretty unwieldy. As I said to someone today, I just had to let go and ride the wave. It made for a great ride. I just wonder if the ride would have been even better with more physician participants.

Mostashari’s Call for “Day of Action” Is a Double Edged Sword

Posted on April 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Neil Versel has a great article on MedCity News that covers some comments from Farzad Mostashari at HIMSS 2015. Here’s a section of his article:

Patient advocates are planning a “day of action” to generate mass demand for consumer access to medical records in the wake of a plan to roll back the Meaningful Use requirement for engaging patients in their own care.

“I think we need to show the policymakers that they’re not just pushing rope here. We need to show that there’s demand,” former national health IT coordinator Dr. Farzad Mostashari said Sunday afternoon during a preconference symposium on patient engagement before the start of HIMSS15 in Chicago.

While I think that Farzad’s suggestion is noble in idea, my gut tells me that it could backfire in a very significant way. You have to remember that a call for a “day of action” is a double edge sword. If that day goes off successfully, then it could make a great case for why we should be requiring the 5% patient engagement in meaningful use as opposed to the single patient record download that’s just been proposed.

However, the opposite can also happen too. If you call for a day of action and then patients don’t request access to their records, then it will lead many to say “We were right. Patients don’t care about accessing their patient records.” This conclusion would be incredibly damaging to the movement towards patients’ getting access to their medical records.

This would be true even if there were other reasons that the day of action wasn’t successful. For example, if you do some poor PR and marketing of the day of action, then It could very likely fail. I’m talking big boy PR and marketing to really get the word out to patients. Healthcare social media and even all of the attendees at HIMSS won’t have the power to get the word out about this idea in order to really see it take off.

While I think the goal is noble and Farzad is right that patients need to really start demanding their data, I think this idea of a “Day of Action” could end really poorly if we’re not careful about it.