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The Important Role of HIM in Healthcare Cybersecurity – HIM Scene

Posted on June 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare organizations that rely on their CSO (Chief Security Officer) to handle cybersecurity in their organizations always annoy me. Cybersecurity requires everyone at the organization to be involved in the effort. One person can have a large influence, but your healthcare organization will never be secure if you don’t have everyone working their best to ensure your organization is secure.

A great example of someone who’s often forgotten in healthcare cybersecurity efforts are HIM professionals. Organizations that do this, do so at their own peril. If you’re not involving your HIM professionals in your cybersecurity efforts, I exhort you to do so today.

One of the best reasons to involve HIM professionals in your security efforts is that they’re often experts on the patchwork of healthcare privacy and security laws. It’s not enough to just ensure you’re being HIPAA compliant. That’s essential, but not sufficient.

Healthcare privacy and security are so important, there are multiple layers of laws trying to protect your health information. Or maybe the laws just aren’t well planned and that’s why we have so many. I’ll let you decide. Either way, in your privacy and security efforts you’re going to need to know HIPAA, HITECH, MACRA, and of course don’t forget the state specific privacy and security laws. No doubt there are more and your HIM professionals are likely some of the people in your organization that knows these laws the best.

Beyond the fact that HIM professionals know the privacy and security laws, HIM professionals are usually well versed in ensuring the right access to the right information in your system. One of the biggest form of breaches is internal breaches from people who were given the wrong permissions on your IT systems.

Making sure someone is auditing and monitoring these permissions is a very important part of your cybersecurity efforts. Plus, don’t forget to have a solid process for removing users when they leave your organization as well. Those zombie user accounts are a ticking time bomb in your security efforts. When your employees verify that their records are in order before they leave with HIM, that might be a good time to remove their access.

Another place HIM professionals can help with healthcare cybersecurity efforts is around information governance. More specifically, HIM can help you properly manage your health data and legacy systems. HIM can ensure that your legacy systems are properly managed until their end of life. No doubt this will be done in tandem with your IT professionals who have to keep these legacy systems secure (not always an easy task). However, an HIM professional can assist with your information governance efforts that impact cybersecurity.

In what other ways can HIM be involved in healthcare cybersecurity?

Cybersecurity is always going to be a team effort. That’s why it’s shocking to me when healthcare organizations don’t involve every part of their team. HIM professionals should step up and make the case for why they should be involved in healthcare’s cybersecurity efforts. However, when they don’t, a great leader will make sure HIM is involved just the same.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

A Look Into the Future of HIM with Rita Bowen – HIM Scene

Posted on June 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

One of my favorite people in the HIM world is Rita Bowen. She is currently Vice President, Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy at MRO, but she has a really impressive HIM resume previous to MRO and a deep understanding of the evolution of HIM and their role in healthcare.

With this experience in mind, I was excited to interview her on the current state of HIM and where HIM is heading in the future. Here are the list of questions I asked Rita if you want to skip to a specific question or you can just watch the full video interview embedded at the bottom of this post.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Genomics is Going to Really Blow Up Our Interoperability Issues

Posted on June 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I slipped over to the Precision Medicine Summit in Boston that’s hosted by HIMSS Media. I heard some good speakers which I’ll write about in the future including legal issues related to genomics and gene editing. However, this tweet from the conference really stuck with me:

This is a sad example of the reality of healthcare interoperability today. Healthcare organizations have problems even sharing something as standard and simple as a PDF. Once we have real genomic data and the markers behind them, EHRs won’t have any idea how to handle them. We’ll need a whole new model and approach or our current interoperability problems will look like child’s play.

By the time we figured that out, our proverbial child might be graduating high school.

Talking Secure Healthcare Communication with Telmediq Founder and CEO

Posted on June 9, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve had a keen interest in the secure text message space ever since I started advising a company in the space many years ago. That company has since been acquired, but I’ve still been keeping watch over the secure text message market. Even back in the early days, we knew that the real holy grail of secure text was to integrate with the EHR and other applications and become a full communication suite and not just a simple text message platform. However, it would take time to really get there. What’s exciting is that we’re starting to see companies that are finally getting there.

One company that’s been making great progress in this direction is a company called Telmediq. Unlike most secure text message companies who started with the physicians, Telmediq approached the secure healthcare communication problem initially from the perspective of nurses. This together with a number of their integrations with EHR and other hospital IT systems prompted me to sit down with Ben Moore, Founder and CEO at Telmediq to learn more about their company and the evolving healthcare communication market.

If you’ve never heard about Telmediq or if you’re interested in what’s happening in the healthcare communication space now and where it’s heading in the future, then you’ll enjoy our interview with Ben Moore. We cover a lot of ground including things like EHR integration, voice integration, alert fatigue, hands free communication, and future items we’re just starting to see like AI and chatbots.

Enjoy our interview with Ben Moore, Founder and CEO at Telmediq:

VA (Veteran’s Administration) Chooses Cerner EHR

Posted on June 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Some really big news just dropped from the VA Secretary, Dr. David J. Shulkin, that the VA has selected Cerner as their EHR replacement to VistA. You can see the full press release at the bottom of this email which outlines the VA Secretary’s reasoning for going with Cerner and the expedited process.

Without getting too much into the details of government procurement, the VA secretary has decided to use a “Determination and Findings” or “D&F” that allows him to avoid the government requirement for a full and open EHR selection and instead be able to solicit the EHR from Cerner directly. I’m pretty sure this will have many of the VistA and even the Epic people up in arms. We may even see some lawsuits out of it, but I don’t expect they’ll go anywhere. Of course, I think most of the VistA people knew this was coming ever since the VA secretary said they’d be pursuing a commercial EHR.

I think most people in the industry thought that the VA would and should go with Cerner for their EHR once the DoD chose Cerner and has since started implementing the Cerner Millennium EHR in what is now known as MHS GENESIS. The only naysayers suggested that the VA might choose Epic over Cerner just because they wanted to be different. That always seemed like a bit of a stretch to me, but it is government and so you can never know what to expect.

You can read the full press release below, but the reasons for choosing Cerner are pretty clear. The release does say that the VA will have its own instance of Cerner. So, they’ll still have to build interoperability between the DoD implementation of Cerner and the VA implementation of Cerner. This isn’t really a surprise when you think about their unique needs and the size of their implementations. Watch for the Cerner interoperability chart to go through the roof once they start sharing records between the DoD and VA.

I also found it interesting to note that the VA has a lot of community partners who are on other EHR platforms. We’ll see how interoperability goes for them. I expect they’ll likely use the standard interoperability options that are out there today.

The VA Secretary did note the concern of many VistA users when he said that “In many ways VA is well ahead of DoD in clinical IT innovations and we will not discard our past work. And our work will help DoD in turn.” I know many VistA fans who suggested that Cerner and Epic were way behing VistA in many areas and so moving to either commercial EHR would be a frustrating thing for many VA VistA users. We’ll see how well the VA Secretary can incorporate their current IT innovation into Cerner. I expect this will be an extremely hard challenge.

Not being an expert on government procurement, I’m interested to know how the VA will handle the rest of the procurement process. If you remember, the DoD’s massive EHR contract was really led by Leidos and not Cerner. Of the $9 billion contract, there were estimates that Cerner would only see $50-100 million per year of the $9 billion. The VA announcement only talks about a contract with Cerner for their EHR. Will they have to do an open bid process for all the services that Leidos and their rainbow of other partners are providing the Cerner DoD implementation?

Those are some initial high level views on this big announcement. What do you think of the announcement? Any other details I missed? Any other questions you have about it?

VA Press Release on Selection of Cerner EHR:

Today U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. David J. Shulkin announced his decision on the next-generation Electronic Health Record (EHR) system for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) at a news briefing at VA headquarters in Washington.

Secretary Shulkin’s full statement is below.

I am here today to announce my decision on the future of the VA’s Electronic Health Record system, otherwise known as EHR.

I wanted to say at the outset that from the day he selected me for this position, the President made clear that we’re going to do things differently for our Veterans, to include in the area of EHR.

I had said previously that I would be making a decision on our EHR by July 1st, and I am honoring that commitment today.

The health and safety of our Veterans is one of our highest national priorities.

Having a Veteran’s complete and accurate health record in a single common EHR system is critical to that care, and to improving patient safety.

Let me say at the outset that I am extremely proud of VA’s longstanding history in IT innovation and in leading the country in advancing the use of EHRs.

  • It was a group of courageous VA clinicians that began this groundbreaking work in the basements of VA’s in the 1970’s that led to the system that we have today, known as the Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture, or VistA.
  • It has been this system that led to the incredible achievements made by VA clinicians and researchers and resulted in VA’s ability to perform as well or better than the private sector in patient safety and quality of care.

That said, our current VistA system is in need of major modernization to keep pace with the improvements in health information technology and cybersecurity, and software development is not a core competency of VA.

I said recently to Congress that I was committed to getting VA out of the software business, that I didn’t see remaining in that business as benefitting Veterans.  And, because of that, we’re making a decision to move towards a commercial off-the-shelf product.

I have not come to this decision on EHR lightly.

I have reviewed numerous studies, reports and commissions, on this topic, including the recent commission on care report.

  • I’ve spent time talking with clinicians, and I use our legacy VistA system myself as a current practicing VA physician.
  • We have consulted with Chief Information Officers from around the country, and I’ve met personally with CEO’s from leading health systems to get their own thoughts on the best next-generation EHR for VA.
  • We’ve studied reports from management consulting companies and from the GAO and the IG on VA’s IT systems.
  • I can count no fewer than 7 Blue Ribbon Commissions, and a large number of congressional hearings that have called for VA to modernize its approach to IT.

At VA, we know where almost all of our Veteran patients is going to come from — from the DoD, and for this reason, Congress has been urging the VA and DoD for at least 17 years — from all the way back in 2000 — to work more closely on EHR issues.

To date, VA and DoD have not adopted the same EHR system. Instead, VA and DoD have worked together for many years to advance EHR interoperability between their many separate applications — at the cost of several hundred millions of dollars — in an attempt to create a consistent and accurate view of individual medical record information.

While we have established interoperability between VA and DOD for key aspects of the health record, seamless care is fundamentally constrained by ever-changing information sharing standards, separate chains of command, complex governance, separate implementation schedules that must be coordinated to accommodate those changes from separate program offices that have separate funding appropriations, and a host of related complexities requiring constant lifecycle maintenance.

And the bottom line is we still don’t have the ability to trade information seamlessly for our Veteran patients and seamlessly execute a share plan of acre with smooth handoffs.

Without improved and consistently implemented national interoperability standards, VA and DoD will continue to face significant challenges if the Departments remain on two different systems.

For these reasons, I have decided that VA will adopt the same EHR system as DoD, now known as MHS GENESIS, which at its core consists of Cerner Millennium.

VA’s adoption of the same EHR system as DoD will ultimately result in all patient data residing in one common system and enable seamless care between the Departments without the manual and electronic exchange and reconciliation of data between two separate systems.

It’s time to move forward, and as Secretary I was not willing to put this decision off any longer.  When DoD went through this acquisition process in 2014 it took far too long.  The entire EHR acquisition process, starting from requirements generation until contract award, took approximately 26 months.

We simply can’t afford to wait that long when it comes to the health of our Veterans.

Because of the urgency and the critical nature of this decision, I have decided that there is a public interest exception to the requirement for full and open competition in this technology acquisition.

Accordingly, under my authority as Secretary of Veterans Affairs, I have signed what is known as a “Determination and Findings,” or D&F, that is a special form of written approval by an authorized official that is required by statute or regulation as a prerequisite to taking certain contract actions.

The D&F notes that there is a public interest exception to the requirement for full and open competition, and determines that the VA may issue a solicitation directly to Cerner Corporation for the acquisition of the EHR system currently being deployed by DoD, for deployment and transition across the VA enterprise in a manner that meets VA needs, and which will enable seamless healthcare to Veterans and qualified beneficiaries.

Additionally we have looked at the need for VA to adopt significant cybersecurity enhancements, and we intend to leverage the architecture, tools and processes that have already been put in place to protect DoD data, to include both physical and virtual separation from commercial clients.

This D&F action is only done in particular circumstances when the public interest demands it, and that’s clearly the case here.  Once again, for the reasons of the health and protection of our Veterans, I have decided that we can’t wait years, as DoD did in its EHR acquisition process, to get our next generation EHR in place.

Let me say what lies ahead, as this is just the beginning of the process.

  • VA has unique needs and many of those are different from the DoD.
  • For this reason, VA will not simply be adopting the identical EHR that DoD uses, but we intend to be on a similar Cerner platform.
  • VA clinicians will be very involved in how this process moves forward and in the implementation of the system.
  • In many ways VA is well ahead of DoD in clinical IT innovations and we will not discard our past work.  And our work will help DoD in turn.
  • Furthermore VA must obtain interoperability with DoD but also with our academic affiliates and community partners, many of whom are on different IT platforms.
  • Therefore we are embarking on creating something that has not been done before — that is an integrated product that, while utilizing the DoD platform, will require a meaningful integration with other vendors to create a system that serves Veterans in the best possible way.
  • This is going to take the cooperation and involvement of many companies and thought leaders, and can serve as a model for the federal government and all of healthcare.

Once again, I want to thank the President for his incredible commitment to helping our Veterans and his support for our team here at the VA as we undertake this important work.

This is an exciting new phase for VA, DOD, and for the country.  Our mission is too important not to get this right and we will.

How Many Platforms Does Each Hospital Own?

Posted on June 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently thinking about how nearly every healthcare IT company I talk to today has some sort of platform. Yes, even our beloved EHR vendors (or not so beloved) often talk about their EHR system as an EHR platform. Is there anything that’s implemented in healthcare IT today that’s not a platform? Everything seems to be a platform these days.

If they have hundreds of health IT systems, then they have hundreds of platforms.

Given this is the case, are they really all platforms? Do we need all of these platforms? Has the word platform just been corrupted and really doesn’t have any meaning any more?

I wonder if hospital CIOs now would be interested in purchasing a piece of healthcare IT software that wasn’t a platform. Would it be better to market a healthcare IT software product as a solution rather than a platform? I’m guessing that most hospital CIOs probably feel like they have plenty of platforms. Am I wrong?

I should be clear. I think the idea of creating a platform with something is a good thing. At least it’s a good thing if you define a platform as something that connects and integrates with other systems and software. This would be a good trend in healthcare since so many so called platforms were at best very closed platforms and at worst not platforms at all. If platform would be defined as being open and interoperable, then I would welcome all these platforms with open arms.

The problem is that I think many healthcare IT vendors (EHR vendors leading this charge) look at their platform as a way to entrench the customer with them. They want to create the end all be all platform that all of a hospital’s future healthcare IT purchases need to integrate with the hospital. This is where the platform idea can fall flat when it comes to health IT customers and patients.

I love a good platform as much as the next person. It’s a powerful way to do business and can really do amazing things to improve the care a patient receives and how efficient a healthcare organization can operate. However, once everything says their a platform it loses meaning. I think we’ve reached that point with the word platform.

Operational CIO vs Strategic CIO

Posted on May 30, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been thinking and writing about the difference between an operational CIO and a strategic CIO for quite a while. There are far too many operational CIOs in healthcare who just want to make sure that the computers are replaced, the internet is fast and that they have good uptime. I believe CIOs that take this approach are making a mistake because they’re turning themselves into a commodity as opposed to a strategic part of their organization.

If you’re not sure of the difference, David Chou shared this great graphic which illustrates the difference between an operational healthcare CIO vs a strategic healthcare CIO.

Do you think it matters if you’re an operational CIO or a strategic CIO? I look forward to your thoughts in the comments.

Epic EHR Switching Video from Mary Washington Healthcare (MWHC)

Posted on May 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re back with another Fun Friday video (and a bonus story) to prepare you for the weekend. This week’s Fun Friday video comes from Mary Washington Healthcare (MWHC) doing a parody of a Hamilton song, “Right Hand Man,” as part of their switch to Epic. The production quality is really quite amazing and I love the choice of Hamilton. Check it out:

Now for a fun little story. I showed one of these EHR go-live videos to the Healthcare IT and EHR course I taught in Dubai. The majority of attendees were from Saudia Arabia with a few from Kuwait and UAE.

Well, the attendees loved the video. I asked them how well creating a video like this would go over in their hospitals. They all laughed and shook their heads. Certainly, the cultures are quite different. However, I did find it interesting that just as many people in the middle east were taking selfies as the US. Maybe the human desire isn’t all that different.

I don’t expect any of my students in the workshop to do anything like the above video. However, the concept of bringing your team together in an effort like what it takes to create this video is a powerful idea that could be applied regardless of culture.

Predicting Readmissions, Longitudinal Record, and Physicians’ Time

Posted on May 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Here’s a quick look around the Twittersphere and a few topics that stood out to me that I think might be of interest to you.


I’ve been following algorithms like this for a while and they’re really starting to come into their own. This type of predictive technology or predictive analytics if you prefer is going to really change how we manage patients in a hospital. If done right, it can help us become proactive instead of reactive. This will require us to change a lot of processes though.


Is a longitudinal health record possible in any format? I’m beginning to think that it’s a pipe dream that will never happen. At least not with our current documentation requirements.

I find time studies like these very interesting. However, the thing I hate about them is that we don’t have a time study from before implementing EHR software so we could compare how a physician used their time before EHR and after. No doubt over 50% of their time being spent on documentation and not face-to-face with the patient feels bad. However, how far off was this from where we were in the paper world?

Looking at the chart, prescription refills can be faster in an EHR. Secure messages can be faster with an EHR since you’re not playing phone tag which was the process before secure messages. Telephone encounters were likely the same. That leaves just the progress notes as the one thing that could be more time consuming in an EHR than the paper chart. How much more is the real question. Paper chart progress notes weren’t all that fast either. That’s why stacks of paper charts that weren’t completed were always sitting on physicians’ desks.

I guess the core question I would ask is, “Are EHRs the reason doctors hate medicine, or are the ongoing regulations and requirements that have been heaped on doctors the real problem?” My guess is that all this documentation overheard that’s being required of doctors was a problem in the paper world, but has been exacerbated in the EHR world. What do you think?

2 Core Healthcare IT Principles

Posted on May 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite bloggers I found when I first starting blogging about Healthcare IT was a hospital CIO named Will Weider who blogged on a site he called Candid CIO. At the time he was CIO of Ministry Health Care and he always offered exceptional insights from his perspective as a hospital CIO. A little over a month ago, Will decided to move on as CIO after 22 years. That was great news for me since it meant he’d probably have more time to blog. The good news is that he has been posting more.

In a recent post, Will offered two guiding principles that I thought were very applicable to any company working to take part in the hospital health IT space:

1. Embed everything in the EHR
2. Don’t hijack the physician workflow

Go and read Will’s post to get his insights, but I agree with both of these principles.

I would add one clarification to his first point. I think there is a space for an outside provider to work outside of the EHR. Think of someone like a care manager. EHR software doesn’t do care management well and so I think there’s a space for a third party care management platform. However, if you want the doctor to access it, then it has to be embedded in the EHR. It’s amazing how much of a barrier a second system is for a doctor.

Ironically, we’ve seen the opposite is also true for people like radiologists. If it’s not in their PACS interface, then it takes a nearly herculean effort for them to leave their PACS system to look something up in the EHR. That’s why I was excited to see some PACS interfaces at RSNA last year which had the EHR data integrated into the radiologists’ interface. The same is true for doctors working in an EHR.

Will’s second point is a really strong one. In his description of this principle, he even suggests that alerts should all but be done away within an EHR except for “the most critical safety situations. He’s right that alert blindness is real and I haven’t seen anyone nail the alerts so well that doctors aren’t happy to see the alerts. That’s the bar we should place on alerts that hijack the physician workflow. Will the doctor be happy you hijacked their workflow and gave them the alert? If the answer is no, then you probably shouldn’t send it.

Welcome back to the blogosphere Will! I look forward to many more posts from you in the future.