Free Hospital EMR and EHR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to Hospital EMR and EHR for FREE!

Healthcare Always Has a Why Not – Essential to Focus on the Why To

Posted on December 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently hosted two roundtables at the Digital Healthcare Transformation conference around the topics of IoT (Internet of Things) and Wearables. The discussion at these roundtables was fascinating and full of promise. Although, it was also clear that all of these healthcare organizations were trying to figure out what was the right strategy when it came to IoT and wearables in their hospitals and health systems. In fact, one of the big takeaways from the roundtables was that the best strategy right now was to have a strategy of experimentation and learning.

While good advice, I was also struck by a simple concept that I’ve seen over and over in healthcare:

If you want a reason not to do something in healthcare, you’ll find one.

It’s a sad, but true principle. Healthcare is so complex that if you want to make an excuse find a reason not to do something, then you can easily find it. In fact, you can usually find multiple reasons.

The most egregious example of this is HIPAA. HIPAA has been an excuse not to do more things in healthcare than any other excuse in the book. When someone says that “HIPAA won’t allow us to do this” then we should just start translating that to mean “I don’t want to do this and so I’m pulling my HIPAA card.” HIPAA certainly requires certain actions, but I know of almost anything that can’t be done in healthcare that could still satisfy HIPAA requirements. At a minimum, you can always ask the patient to consent to essentially wave HIPAA and if the patient consents then you’re not in violation of HIPAA. However, in most cases you can meet HIPAA security and compliance requirements without having to go that far. However, if you’re looking for a reason not to do something, just say HIPAA.

Another one I’ve seen used and is much harder is when someone says, “I think this risks the quality of care we provide.” Notice the emphasis on the word THINK. Healthcare providers don’t have to have any evidence that a new technology, workflow, process, etc actually risks the quality of care. They just have to think that it could reduce the quality of care and it will slow everything down and often hijack the entire project. Forget any sort of formal studies or proof that the changes are better. If the providers’ gut tells them that it could risk the quality of care, it takes a real leader to push beyond that complaint and to force the provider to spend the time necessary to translate why their gut tells them it will be worse.

If we focus on the Why Not in healthcare, we’ll always find it. That’s why healthcare must focus on the Why to!

Use the examples of IoT or wearables and think about all the reasons healthcare should use these new technologies. It’s amazing how this new frame of reference changes your perspective. Wearables can help you understand the patient beyond the short time they spend in the hospital or doctor’s office. Wearables can help you better diagnose a patient. Wearables can help you better understand a chronic patient’s habits. etc etc etc. You obviously have to go much deeper into specific benefits, but you get the idea.

What I’ve found is that once you figure out the “Why to” make a change or implement a new technology, then it’s much easier to work through all of the “Why nots.” In fact, it turns the Why Nots into problems that need to be solved rather than excuses to not even consider a change. You can solve problems. Excuses are often impossible to overcome.

I’d love to hear your experience with this idea. Have you seen Why Nots hijack your projects? What are some of the other Why Not reasons you’ve seen? Has the move to asking “Why to” helped you in your projects?

CHIME Suspends the $1 Million Dollar National Patient ID Challenge

Posted on November 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CHIME just announced that they’ve suspended their National Patient ID Challenge. For those not familiar with the challenge, almost 2 years ago CHIME Announced a $1 million prize for companies to solve the patient identification and matching problem in healthcare. Here’s the description of the challenge from the HeroX website that hosted the challenge:

The CHIME National Patient ID Challenge is a global competition aimed at incentivizing new, early-stage, and experienced innovators to accelerate the creation and adoption of a solution for ensuring 100 percent accuracy in identifying patients in the U.S. Patients want the right treatment and providers want information about the right patient to provide the right treatment. Patients also want to protect their privacy and feel secure that their identity is safe.

And here’s the “Challenge Breakthrough” criteria:

CHIME Healthcare Innovation Trust is looking for the best plan, strategies and methodologies that will accomplish the following:

  • Easily and quickly identify patients
  • Achieve 100% accuracy in patient identification
  • Protect patient privacy
  • Protect patient identity
  • Achieve adoption by the vast majority of patients, providers, insurers, and other stakeholders
  • Scale to handle all patients in the U.S.

When you look at the fine print, it says CHIME (or the Healthcare Innovation Trust that they started to host the challenge) could cancel the challenge at any time without warning or explanation including removing the Prize completely:

5. Changes and Cancellation. Healthcare Innovation Trust reserves the right to make updates and/or make any changes to, or to modify the scope of the Challenge Guidelines and Challenge schedule at any time during the Challenge. Innovators are responsible for regularly reviewing the Challenge site to ensure they are meeting all rules and requirements of and schedule for the Challenge. Healthcare Innovation Trust has the right to cancel the Challenge at any time, without warning or explanation, and to subsequently remove the Prize completely.

It seems that CHIME’s legally allowed to suspend the challenge. However, that doesn’t mean that doesn’t burn the trust of the community that saw them put out the $1 million challenge. The challenge created a lot of fanfare including promotion by ONC on their website, which is a pretty amazing thing to even consider. CHIME invested a lot in this challenge, so it must hurt for them to suspend it.

To be fair, when the challenge was announced I hosted a discussion where I asked the question “Is this even solvable?” At 100% does that mean that no one could ever win the challenge? With that in mind, the challenge always felt a bit like Fool’s Gold to me and I’m sure many others. I thought, “CHIME could always come back and make the case that no one could ever reach 100% and so they’d never have to pay the money.” Those that participated had to feel this as well and they participated anyway.

The shameful part to me is how suspending the competition is leaving those who did participate high and dry. I asked CHIME about this and they said that the Healthcare Innovation Trust is still in touch with the finalists and that they’re encouraging them to participate in the newly created “Patient Identification Task Force.” Plus, the participants received an honorarium.

Participation in a CHIME Task Force and the honorarium seems like a pretty weak consolation prize. In fact, I can’t imagine any of the vendors that participated in the challenge would trust working with CHIME going forward. Maybe some of them will swallow hard and join the task force, but that would be a hard choice after getting burnt like this. It’s possible CHIME is offering them some other things in the background as well.

What’s surprising to me is why CHIME didn’t reach out to the challenge participants and say that none of them were going to win, but that CHIME still wanted to promote their efforts and offerings to provide a solid benefit to those that participated. CHIME could present the lessons learned from the challenge and share all the solutions that were submitted and the details of where they fell short and where they succeeded. At least this type of promotion and exposure would be a nice consolation prize for those who spent a lot of time and money participating in the challenge. Plus, the CIOs could still benefit from something that solved 95% of their problems.

Maybe the new Patient Identification Task Force will do this and I hope they do. CHIME did it for their new Opioid Task Force at the Fall Forum when they featured it on the main stage. How about doing the same for the Patient Identification Challenge participants? I think using the chance to share the lessons learned would be a huge win for CHIME and its members. I imagine it’s hard for CHIME to admit “failure” for something they worked on and promoted so much. However, admitting the failure and sharing what was learned from it would be valuable for everyone involved.

While I expect CHIME has burnt at least some of the challenge participants, the CHIME CIO members probably knew the challenge was unlikely to succeed and won’t be burnt by this decision. Plus, the challenge did help to call national attention to the issue which is a good thing and as they noted will help continue to push forward the national patient identifier efforts in Washington. Maybe now CHIME will do as Andy Aroditis, Founder and CEO of NextGate, suggested in this article where Shaun Sutner first reported on issues with the CHIME National Patient ID Challenge:

Aroditis complained that rather than plunging into a contest, CHIME should have convened existing patient matching vendors, like his company, to collaborate on a project to advance the technology.

“Instead they try to do these gimmicks,” Aroditis said.

I imagine that’s what CHIME would say the Patient Identification Task Force they created will now do. The question is whether CHIME burnt bridges they’ll need to cross to make that task force effective.

The reality is that Patient Identification and Patient Matching is a real problem that’s experienced by every healthcare organization. It’s one that CHIME members feel in their organizations and many of them need better solutions. As Beth Just from Just Associates noted in my discussion when the challenge was announced, $1 million is a drop in the bucket compared to what’s already been invested to solve the problem.

Plus, many healthcare organizations are in denial when it comes to this problem. They may say they have an accuracy of 98%, the reality is very different when a vendor goes in and wakes them up to what’s really happening in their organization. This is not an easy problem to solve and CHIME now understands this more fully. I hope their new task force is successful in addressing the problem since it is an important priority.

Healthcare Cloud Hosting with Chad Kissinger, Founder of OnRamp

Posted on November 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Cloud hosting is a reality in pretty much every healthcare organization. This is particularly true in hospitals that have hundreds of healthcare IT solutions with many of them being hosted in the cloud. While some are hosted in the health IT vendor’s cloud, I’m also seeing more and more hospitals looking to get out of the data center business and moving their various health IT software to a third party data center. I expect this trend will continue and we’ll eventually see hospitals who don’t have any onsite data center.

As the highly regulated healthcare IT world has moved to the cloud, I’ve seen data centers crop up that cater specifically to the needs of healthcare. One of those companies who’s focused on healthcare data center and cloud offerings is OnRamp. I recently sat down to interview Chad Kissinger, Founder of OnRamp, to learn more about their approach to healthcare cloud hosting and what makes healthcare hosting unique. I also talked with Chad about OnRamp’s recent HITRUST certification and what that means for healthcare providers and what OnRamp is doing to ensure security beyond the HITRUST certification. Plus, Chad offered some great insights into where he sees this all heading.

You can watch my full video interview with OnRamp CEO, Chad Kissinger, embedded at the bottom of this blog post, or click on any of the links below to skip to the sections of the interview that interest you most:

Be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube and check out all of our Healthcare IT video interviews and content.

Full Disclosure: OnRamp is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Predictive Analytics with Andy Bartley from Intel

Posted on September 20, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

#Paid content sponsored by Intel.

In the latest Healthcare Scene video interview, I talk with Andy Bartley, Senior Solutions Architect in the Health and Life Sciences Group at Intel. Andy and I talk about the benefits of and challenges to using predictive analytics in healthcare.

Andy offers some great insights on the subject, having had a long and varied career in the industry. Before joining Intel, he served in multiple healthcare organizations, including nurse communication and scheduling application startup NurseGrid, primary care practice One Medical Group and medical device manufacturer Stryker.

In my interview, he provides a perspective on what hospitals and health systems should be doing to leverage predictive analytics to improve care and outcomes, even if they don’t have a massive budget. Plus, he talks about predictive analytics that are already happening today.

Here are the list of questions I asked him if you’d like to skip to a specific topic in the video. Otherwise, you can watch the full video interview in the embedded video at the bottom of this post:

What are your thoughts on predictive analytics? How is it changing healthcare as we know it? What examples have you seen of effective predictive analytics? We look forward to seeing your thoughts in the comments and on social media.

Patient Centered Design and Business Centered Design with Amy Cueva

Posted on September 15, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During the busy conference season I often shoot a lot of videos and there’s never enough time to process all of the videos I shoot. So, a number of great videos slip through the cracks. Well, as I prepare for another busy fall conference season I realized I never processed the video interview I did with Amy Cueva, Founder and Chief Experience Officer at Mad*Pow, last year at the Connected Health Symposium.

Amy is one of my favorite people in healthcare to talk with because she’s so focused and interested in how we can redesign healthcare with the patient at the center. She was one of the first people I met that talked about user centered design in healthcare or more aptly put patient centered design.

You can learn more about Amy and her company Mad*Pow in the video interview embedded at the bottom of this post. Plus, in the video I asked her about a new thing she’s working on called business centered design. This is something that is needed in healthcare as much as patient centered design. In fact, in many ways, that’s why we created Health IT Expo.

For those who don’t watch the full video interview below, here’s a great quote from our interview with Amy:

What do people really need and want. The way the health system is structured we expect patients to be obedient and adherent and serve us. Well, how do we create a system that serves them and their needs and what’s important to them and design it accordingly because then we’re going to get better results.

Check out our full video interview with Amy Cueva:

If you like this video interview with Amy Cueva, be sure to subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube and check out our other videos.

Healthcare Interoperability and Standards Rules

Posted on September 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dave Winer is a true expert on standards. I remember coming across him in the early days of social media when every platform was considering some sort of API. To illustrate his early involvement in standards, Dave was one of the early developers of the RSS standard that is now available on every blog and many other places.

With this background in mind, I was extremely fascinated by a manifesto that Dave Winer published earlier this year that he calls “Rules for Standards-Makers.” Sounds like something we really need in healthcare no?

You should really go and read the full manifesto if you’re someone involved in healthcare standards. However, here’s the list of rules Dave offers standards makers:

  1. There are tradeoffs in standards
  2. Software matters more than formats (much)
  3. Users matter even more than software
  4. One way is better than two
  5. Fewer formats is better
  6. Fewer format features is better
  7. Perfection is a waste of time
  8. Write specs in plain English
  9. Explain the curiosities
  10. If practice deviates from the spec, change the spec
  11. No breakage
  12. Freeze the spec
  13. Keep it simple
  14. Developers are busy
  15. Mail lists don’t rule
  16. Praise developers who make it easy to interop

If you’ve never had to program to a standard, then you might not understand these. However, those who are deep into standards will understand the pitfalls. Plus, you’ll have horror stories about when you didn’t follow these rules and what challenges that caused for you going forward.

The thing I love most about Dave’s rules is that it focuses on simplicity and function. Unfortunately, many standards in healthcare are focused on complexity and perfection. Healthcare has nailed the complexity part and as Dave’s rules highlight, perfection is impossible with standards.

In fact, I skipped over Dave’s first rule for standards makers which highlights the above really well:

Rule #1: Interop is all that matters

As I briefly mentioned in the last CXO Scene podcast, many healthcare CIOs are waiting until the standards are perfect before they worry about interoperability. It’s as if they think that waiting for the perfect standard is going to solve healthcare interoperability. It won’t.

I hope that those building out standards in healthcare will take a deep look at the rules Dave Winer outlines above. We need better standards in healthcare and we need healthcare data to be interoperable.

Preview of #AHIMACon17 – HIM Scene

Posted on September 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

I thought it might be interesting to check out the #AHIMACon17 conference hashtag for the AHIMA Annual Convention to get an idea of what the hot topics were going to be going into the annual convention. Unfortunately, there wasn’t much conversation happening on the hashtag yet. Here’s a sample of a few things I found and some of my commentary about each.


I’m excited to hear Viola Davis as well. I’m sure she has some amazing stories. It’s not clear to me her connection to healthcare, but I’m all about hearing the stories of successful people. I hope they let her tell her story and not try to have her be a healthcare speaker. Ironically, the MGMA Annual Conference is happening at the same time as the AHIMA Annual Convention about 45 minutes away. Viola Davis is keynoting both. I’m not sure if they planned this together or if it’s just coincidence. Either way, I guess I get 2 chances to hear Viola, but trying to manage both events is hard.


This tweet from Ciox made me laugh. There’s a lot of things in healthcare that are still stuck in the 80s. As Mr. H from HIStalk likes to say, Healthcare is where old technology goes to die. There’s certainly some modernization that could happen at about every healthcare organization.


This tweet is ironic after the above tweet talking about the need to modernize. I wonder how many in the AHIMA community are familiar with NLP based technology. For those not familiar, NLP stands for natural language processing. It can be used in a variety of ways, but in the AHIMA world it’s most commonly used to analyze medical records and assess if the documentation matches the coding. It’s pretty amazing technology. I also love seeing NLP used on narrative sections of a note to identify granular data elements that could be used to better inform clinical decision support tools. Do many HIM professionals care about this technology? Are they using it? I think I’ll ask when I’m at the event.


I think security will be an extremely hot topic this year. Given HIM’s role in doing release of information (ROI), it’s always had an important role. In fact, they have a pre-conference Privacy & Security Institute that I’ve heard a lot of great things about. I’m hoping to go this year if they let press attend.

Will you be at #AHIMACon17? What do you expect to be the hot topics? Are there sessions you absolutely must attend? Who’s going to throw the best party? I hope to see many of you at the conference!

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Hospital EMR and EHR Supporters

Posted on September 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I’ve been preparing to launch a new secret healthcare IT event into the wild, I’ve been going through all the various connections Hospital EMR and EHR and Healthcare Scene have made in the world of Healthcare IT.  It’s really quite extraordinary what 11 years of blogging about healthcare IT provides as far as relationships.  Many people wonder if they should waste their time blogging.  I can assure you that the relationships I’ve made blogging here at Hospital EMR and EHR have provided some of the most amazing opportunities and experiences well beyond what I could have ever imagined.

With this in mind, we want to specifically thank each of the Hospital EMR and EHR sponsors for their support.  If you enjoy the content we create on this site, take a minute to look through these sponsors and see if any of them can help you with some of your pressing challenges.

Galen Healthcare Solutions – We’ve long been admirers of the work they do at Galen Healthcare Solutions.  They were one of the first organizations we interacted with on a blog when talking about EHR conversions.  They’re experts in that space and have also been doing a lot of work in the legacy health IT application space.  Plus, they’ve been providing a bunch of EMR optimization services as well.  If any of these are challenges in your organization, check out how Galen Healthcare Solutions can help.

Intel Health – Most of you have probably seen our series of CIO video interviews that we did that was sponsored by Intel. We have another video coming out shortly where we interviewed one of Intel’s predictive analytics experts as well.  He offers some real practical insights into predictive analytics, where it’s happening today, and where it’s going in the future.  Watch for that video interview coming out shortly.

Conduent – Together with Conduent, we’ve been publishing the Breakaway Thinking blog post series that’s sponsored by the Breakaway Learning Solutions (A Conduent Company). When it comes to EHR training, I know of no one that understands how to train a hospital or healthcare system better than this group.

FormFast – Every healthcare organization uses forms.  However, a lot of them still haven’t realized the value of purchasing a real forms management solution.  If you’re not one of the 1100 healthcare organizations already using FormFast’s forms technology, then take a look at what they offer and how they can make your forms management experience better.  I love how well FormFast has been able to integrate with EHR vendors and now even offer a solution that goes out to patients.

Iron Mountain – Healthcare Scene has been doing a whole series of blog posts for the Iron Mountain blog.  Many of you know Iron Mountain, but did you know they have a whole suite of IT and data center services along with their records management, document imaging, data management, secure shredding, etc?

MRO – Since we started HIM Scene, we’ve gotten deeper and deeper into the world of Health Information Management (HIM…or Medical Records if you’re old school like that).  We’re really happy to have MRO sponsoring HIM Scene including providing some great HIM related content.

HIPAA One – HIPAA One’s goal is to make managing HIPAA Risk Assessments easy and effective.  If you’re an organization that’s had to think about how to manage a large array of business associates and if those business associates have done a proper HIPAA risk assessment, take a minute to look at what HIPAA One can offer.  If you ever get a HIPAA audit, you’ll be glad you did your risk assessment using HIPAA One.

MedicaSoft – This is a brand new sponsor for us, but we’re happy to have them sponsoring Healthcare Scene. Along with offering a full EHR solution, Medicasoft also is seeing a lot of traction with their Paitent Portal solution and their interoperability solutions. I love the way MedicaSoft describes their solutions: “Innovative Healthcare IT Products Built with Modern Technology.” I know this is what many would like to see in healthcare.

Stericycle Communication Solutions – A lot of people know of Stericycle, but not enough people know about Stericycle Communication Solutions. They provide a wide variety of communication solutions for healthcare including patient reminders, call center services, patient self scheduling and much more.  Be sure to check out their Communication Solution Series of blog posts.

Hopefully I didn’t leave anyone out. As you can see we have a great group of companies that support Hospital EMR and EHR. We’re lucky to have them as supporters of the work we do. I’m sure that some of these companies can help you deal with the challenges you’re facing at your hospital or health system.  If you want to join this great group of companies, you can find information about advertising on Hospital EMR and EHR here.

CXO Scene Episode 3: EHR Cloud Hosting, the EMR Market, and Health IT Staffing Challenges

Posted on August 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed the live taping of the third CXO Scene podcast with David Chou, Vice President and Chief Information and Digital Officer at Children’s Mercy Kansas City and John Lynn, Founder of HealthcareScene.com, the video recording is now available below.

Here were the 3 topics we discussed on the 2nd CXO Scene podcast along with some reference links for the topics:
* Cloud hosting
http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/uc-san-diego-health-pushes-ehrs-to-cloud-uc-irvine-slated-for-november

* Future of the EMR market with McKesson acquisition
http://www.mckesson.com/about-mckesson/newsroom/press-releases/2017/allscripts-to-acquire-mckessons-enterprise-information-solutions-business/
http://www.hospitalemrandehr.com/2017/08/18/is-allscripts-an-also-ran-in-the-hospital-emr-business/

* IT staffing challenges

You can watch the full CXO Scene video podcast on the Healthcare Scene YouTube Channel or in the video embed below:

Note: We’re still working on distributing CXO Scene on your favorite podcasting platform. We’ll update this post once we finally have those podcast options in place.

Take a look back at past CXO Scene podcasts and posts and join us for the live recording of future CXO Scene podcasts.

Patient Engagement and Collaborative Care with Drex DeFord

Posted on August 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

#Paid content sponsored by Intel.

You don’t see guys like Drex DeFord every day in the health IT world. Rather than following the traditional IT career path, he began his career as a rock ‘n roll disc jockey. He then served as a US Air Force officer for 20 years — where his assignments included service as regional CIO for 12 hospitals across the southern US and CTO for Air Force Health — before focusing on private-sector HIT.

After leaving the Air Force, he served as CIO of Scripps Health, Seattle Children’s Hospital and Steward Health before forming drexio digital health (he describes himself as a “recovering CIO”). Drex is also a board member for a number of companies and was on the HIMSS National board and the Chairman of CHIME.

Given this extensive background in healthcare IT leadership, we wanted to get Drex’s insights into patient engagement and collaborative care. As organizations have shifted to value based reimbursement, this has become a very important topic to understand and implement in an organization. Have you created a culture of collaborative care in your organization? If not, this interview with Drex will shed some light on what you need to do to build that culture.

You can watch the full video interview embedded below or click from this list of topics to skip to the section of the video that interests you most:

What are you doing in your organization to engage patients? How are you using technology to facilitate collaborative care?