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Managing Health Information to Ensure Patient Safety

Posted on August 17, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

This post is part of the HIM Series of blog posts. If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) have been a great addition to healthcare organizations and I know many would agree that some tasks have been significantly improved from paper to electronic. Others may still be cautious with EMRs due to the potential patient safety concerns that EMRs bring to light.

The Joint Commission expects healthcare organizations to engage in the latest health information technologies but we must do so safely and appropriately. In 2008, The Joint Commission released Sentinel Event Alert Issue 42 which advised organizations to be mindful of the patient safety risks that can result from “converging technologies”.

The electronic technologies we use to gather patient data could pose potential threats and adverse events. Some of these threats include the use of computerized physician order entry (CPOE), information security, incorrect documentation, and clinical decision support (CDS).  Sentinel Event Alert Issue 54 in 2015 again addressed the safety risks of EMRs and the expectation that healthcare organizations will safely implement health information technology.

Having incorrect data in the EMR poses serious patient safety risks that are preventable which is why The Joint Commission has put this emphasis on safely using the technology. We will not be able to blame patient safety errors on the EMR when questioned by surveyors, especially when they could have been prevented.

Ensuring medical record integrity has always been the objective of HIM departments. HIM professionals’ role in preventing errors and adverse events has been apparent from the start of EMR implementations. HIM professionals should monitor and develop methods to prevent issues in the following areas, to name a few:

Copy and paste

Ensure policies are in place to address copy and paste. Records can contain repeated documentation from day to day which could have been documented in error or is no longer current. Preventing and governing the use of copy and paste will prevent many adverse issues with conflicting or erroneous documentation.

Dictation/Transcription errors

Dictation software tools are becoming more intelligent and many organizations are utilizing front end speech recognition to complete EMR documentation. With traditional transcription, we have seen anomalies remaining in the record due to poor dictation quality and uncorrected errors. With front end speech recognition, providers are expected to review and correct their own dictations which presents similar issues if incorrect documentation is left in the record.

Information Security

The data that is captured in the EMR must be kept secure and available when needed. We must ensure the data remains functional and accessible to the correct users and not accessible by those without the need to know. Cybersecurity breaches are a serious threat to electronic data including those within the EMR and surrounding applications.

Downtime

Organizations must be ready to function if there is a planned or unexpected downtime of systems. Proper planning includes maintaining a master list of forms and order-sets that will be called upon in the case of a downtime to ensure documentation is captured appropriately. Historical information should be maintained in a format that will allow access during a downtime making sure users are able to provide uninterrupted care for patients.

Ongoing EMR maintenance

As we continue to enhance and optimize EMRs, we must take into consideration all of the potential downstream effects of each change and how these changes will affect the integrity of the record. HIM professionals need prior notification of upcoming changes and adequate time to test the new functionality. No changes should be made to an EMR without all of the key stakeholders reviewing and approving the changes downstream implications. The Joint Commission claims, “as health IT adoption becomes more widespread, the potential for health IT-related patient harm may increase.”

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Value Based Reimbursement: Another Challenge for HIM Professionals

Posted on August 3, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

How many times have you heard something along these lines: “HIM professionals must stay relevant and current with the continuous healthcare changes.” I must sound like a broken record to my team but it is absolutely true! HIM professionals provide the bridge between clinical data and reimbursement methodologies through CDI, coding, documentation integrity, and health data analytics to name a few. It has been proven time and time again that these HIM skills are vital to healthcare organizations but these skills must also be adapted and be put to good use each time a new guideline or rule is introduced.

Value-Based Reimbursement is an area that continues to grow with the push for quality patient outcomes and healthcare savings with potential penalties for excessive costs and poor quality of care. Reimbursement incentives that are tied to quality of care make perfect sense and HIM professionals need to take the plunge into these initiatives. By marrying departments and cross-functioning teams, we are able to generate proactive data and improve performance.

At my facility, I oversee the HIM department as well as the Quality department because we work closely together and will continue to have an even closer relationship throughout healthcare reform. This is becoming very common in the industry.

In this roundtable article for the Journal of AHIMA, we each outlined how we are bringing HIM to the table for Value Based Reimbursement initiatives and maximizing the tried and true skills of HIM professionals.

I have said it before and I will continue to say it: Always keep your finger on the pulse of healthcare and stay relevant by taking on these new challenges!

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Are We Outgrowing HIM Systems?

Posted on July 15, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

We have changed and adapted to a rapid influx of electronic medical records and data over the last several years and it’s no surprise that some systems have struggled to keep the pace. Electronic medical records (EMRs) are in a state of constant revision to make sure patient care, clinical functionality, and data security measures are keeping up with our needs. It seems there are software application solutions or enhancements to almost every task we do in healthcare and these systems are also constantly evolving.

I don’t know of any healthcare application system or workflow that has remained static year over year and because of this, it is important for us to stay on top of vendors and keep an eye on current and future needs of HIM workflows. Clinical Documentation Improvement (CDI) is one of those areas that has been evolving since it first came on the scene and it is currently undergoing yet another face-lift. We realized there were many revenue opportunities hiding within inpatient clinical documentation and found that we could maximize reimbursement with a little detective work and physician education along with sophisticated software tools. Many are exploring the idea of CDI for outpatient levels of care. This means we will need software applications, interfaces, and expanded CDI workflows to extend these opportunities to outpatient documentation. Have you thought about what you will need from your vendors to adapt or upgrade current systems and how much will need to be budgeted for?

As we work to implement computer assisted coding (CAC) programs, we see opportunities to increase coder and CDI productivity and capture even more quality documentation by using discrete EMR data to our advantage. But are these CAC systems ready to be pushed to the limits to enter unchartered waters? I personally do not have a CAC success story to tell as of yet, but I am exploring the options and hoping that these systems have matured more than when we first explored them a few years ago.

That’s the beauty of technology in healthcare; if a product does not meet your needs, there may be other options already on the market or rapidly developing new technologies on the horizon. A vast amount of data may be held hostage in our systems if we do not maximize our EMRs and applications and set our standards high in a quest for knowledge. We can’t rely 100% on technology to dictate what we do which is why we need to be the visionaries and demand more from our systems in order to accomplish new and exciting things in HIM.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

The Cost of Encouraging Patient Engagement

Posted on June 15, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

We all know that healthcare providers want to encourage patient engagement to ensure patients have the information they need to manage conditions and share information with other providers. There has been a longstanding push for the adoption and maintenance of personal health records for many years to give patients the power to share and disseminate information wherever it is needed. We have seen a remarkable new interest in this with Meaningful Use and population health initiatives. Since HIM professionals are charged with maintaining and producing legal copies of records, we are aware that the tasks surrounding these processes can be very expensive. This is especially true if any of the tasks are not handled properly and breaches of protected information occur.

My concern is that lately I have heard many discussions that are pushing for more access yet with fewer costs to patients to encourage patient engagement. Some are even pushing for patients to have “free” access to records- paper or electronic. Don’t get me wrong, I am a huge proponent for patients having copies of their records and I personally keep copies of my own records. The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) recently published further guidance on charging for records. In a nutshell, the OCR says: “copying fees should be reasonable. They may include the cost of labor for creating and delivering electronic or paper copies; the cost of supplies, including paper and portable media such as CDs or USB drives; and the cost of postage when copies of records are mailed to patients at their request.” The OCR actually has the authority to audit the costs of producing records if they feel your organization is violating this patient right and overcharging for release of information.

Living in a state such as Florida where the state law has allowed facilities to charge up to $1 per page means most facilities have charged $1 per page without blinking an eye. The latest OCR guidance has led to questioning if that amount is actually “reasonable” or true to cost. Afterall, HIM professionals must use expensive systems, supplies, and labor costs to produce these records. Many organizations have outsourced release of information functions (another cost) but it is still the responsibility of the custodian of records to oversee the processes for compliance.

That being said, it is beneficial for HIM departments to evaluate the expenses and methods used to produce records as technologies and laws change. Dr. Karen Desalvo of the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) strives to lead the EMR interoperability movement. At the top of the ONC’s list of commitments is consumer access to records. HIM professionals should continue to assist in the quest for interoperability and electronic data sharing at the notion of patient engagement. We must lead patients to use EMR patient portals and facilitate the efficient electronic data sharing among healthcare providers. We must be creative in lowering overhead costs to produce and maintain the records in order to ensure costs are affordable for healthcare consumers. There will always be costs associated with this important task, whether on the provider’s end or the patient’s end, just as costs are incurred with most services or products in every industry.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

ICD-10 Check-Up

Posted on May 13, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

It’s hard to believe it has been seven months since we implemented ICD-10 in the US. We talked about this subject and planned for so many years and now it feels like second nature. Looking back, I would label the implementation mostly successful and smooth. Would you say the same?

If you’re like me, you have forgotten some or most ICD-9 codes and have a nice repertoire of ICD-10 diagnosis codes swimming around in your head daily. At least memorizing the beginning of a code is helpful when you only need to search the encoder for the fourth through seventh digits of the code to further specify laterality and detail.

Conducting an external audit on ICD-10 coded accounts at this point is a good idea to make sure coders are accurate with the new code set. It’s important to watch for any trends in DRG shifts that may be attributable to ICD-10. If claims data for the past seven months have not been reconciled with expected reimbursement, now is a good time to be reviewing for coding and billing accuracy.

We were promised more specificity with ICD-10 and I believe we have somewhat achieved that. There are still opportunities to improve physician documentation and gather more detail in order to assign the correct codes. For the most part, I believe physicians have been affected by HIM teams bringing awareness to specific documentation and education on what is needed for ICD-10 coding and billing. ICD-10 has not turned out to be the burden that everyone was initially so reluctant to; at least from my experience.

In the blog post I wrote soon after ICD-10 implementation, I mentioned that coder productivity was a big issue to watch for with ICD-10. With sophisticated coding tools, thorough training, and skilled coders, the productivity impact has been real but not nearly to the extent some HIM managers were bracing for. We are starting to see coder productivity come to a manageable level that will probably be the norm for the foreseeable future.

I’m happy to report that I feel confident in ICD-10 as our designated code set and based on peer input, I think others will agree. The specificity was much needed after many years of vague or catch-all codes. This paves the way for better data reporting and thus more quality information resulting in better disease management. Accurate reimbursement is an obvious bonus as well.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Can HIM Professionals Become Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists?

Posted on April 21, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

Most acute care hospitals have implemented a clinical documentation improvement (CDI) program to drive appropriate reimbursement and clarification of documentation. These roles typically live (and should live) within the HIM department. Clinical Documentation Specialists (CDS) work closely with the medical staff and coders to ensure proper documentation and must have an understanding of coding and reimbursement methodologies along with clinical knowledge.

Certain aspects of the CDI or CDS role require in-depth clinical knowledge and experience to read and understand what documentation is already in the chart and find what is missing. Some diagnoses may be hiding in ambiguous documentation and it is up to the CDS to gather consensus from the medical staff to clarify through front-end queries. There are many tools available to assist in this process by creating worklists and documentation suggestions based on diagnosis criteria and best practices. The focus of CDI is not entirely on reimbursement, although it is a nice reward to receive appropriate reimbursement for the treatment provided while obtaining compliant documentation for regulatory purposes.

Determining or changing the potential DRG prior to discharging a patient provides a secondary data source for many healthcare functions such as case management, the plan of care, decision support, and alternative payment models. For these reasons, a CDS must know the coding guidelines for selecting a principal diagnosis that will ultimately determine the DRG.

Inpatient coders also have the foundational skills to perform this role. Coders and HIM professionals are required to have advanced knowledge of anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, and clinical documentation. Therefore, to answer my original question “Can HIM professionals become Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists?”, the answer is absolutely. But I will say that it depends on the organization as to whether nursing licensure and clinical experience is required in the job description.

Some organizations have mixed CDI teams consisting of coders and nurses while others may allow only nurses to qualify for this role. The impact of who performs the CDS role in the CDI program all lies in the understanding of the documentation, knowledge of coding guidelines, and detective work to remedy missing or conflicting documentation.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

Making the Case for a Unique Patient Identifier – #MyHealthID

Posted on April 13, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare is a high priority for the US Government and as HIM professionals, we know the importance of keeping our fingers on the pulse of issues facing our nation. We must stay current with proposed regulatory changes and those that address the needs of the US healthcare system as they relate to HIM, privacy and security, and Health IT. One issue our nation has struggled with is secure universal identification for citizens. Social security numbers were not originally meant to be secure identifiers yet they have controversially been used as unique identifiers by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for many years.

In our line of work, we see all of the potential negative implications and the important role that patient identification plays in patient safety, HIPAA compliance, and health record accuracy. When patients are not appropriately identified throughout the continuum of care, many issues arise that can lead to misdiagnosing, incomplete information, unnecessary testing, and fraud to name a few. Duplicates and overlays are far too common due to issues matching patient names and dates of birth versus using a universal secure identifier. Sharing information through health information exchange is nearly impossible when patients are registered in multiple systems with different spellings or misidentification.

The HITECH act of 2009 laid the ground work for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to standardize unique health identifiers among other tasks but we have yet to see any real progress on this subject due to federal budget barriers. In response to this, AHIMA sees this as a critical need and has started a petition to the White House to:

“Remove the federal budget ban that prohibits the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from participating in efforts to find a patient identification solution. We support a voluntary patient safety identifier. Accurate patient identification is critical in providing safe care, but the sharing of electronic health information is being compromised because of patient identification issues. Let’s start the conversation and find a solution.”

The campaign is called MyHealthID and looks to have 100,000 signatures on the petition to garner the attention of the US Government. HIM professionals recently took to Washington, DC to visit with Congressmen and Senators from each state to advocate for MyHealthID. The message that “there’s only one you,” hopes to resonate with politicians and make the case that a unique patient identifier is necessary and important to healthcare.

I encourage all healthcare professionals to sign this petition and assist the advocacy efforts toward a unique patient identifier. MyHealthID will not only help with HIM and Health IT initiatives; it will be in the best interest of healthcare consumers nationwide.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

10 Awesome Things About HIM Professionals to Celebrate HIP Week

Posted on April 6, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

April 3-9, 2016 is known as Health Information Professionals (HIP) week. This annual event is a great time for celebrating accomplishments and touting the diverse skills of HIM professionals. I came up with a list of great things for us to brag about during HIP week and every day:

  1. HIM Careers: There are roughly 180,000 HIM professionals in the United States. There are 15 nationally recognized professional credentials available for HIM. (Keep spreading the word so we are recognized when asked what we do for a living. We are not just Medical Records!)
  2. Information Governance: HIM professionals are the gatekeepers of health information and are perfectly apt to take on new exciting roles in Information Governance and Data Analytics.
  3. Advocacy: HIM professionals are in Washington, DC this week advocating for a unique patient safety identifier- My Health ID. Be sure to sign the petition to remove the ban that prevents HHS from working on this important endeavor.
  4. ICD-10: ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS coding classification systems were successfully implemented in October 2015 and are providing more specificity and detail to health data for documentation quality improvement and secondary data usage.
  5. Job Growth: There is a projected job growth of 18-26% in HIM positions in 2016. Source: Monster.com
  6. Remote Coding: Many medical coding professionals are able to work remotely from home.
  7. Social Media: A new hashtag for HIM social media conversations was started this week- #HIMsocial.
  8. Networking: We have great networking opportunities in HIM – conferences, online forums, and social media are great ways to learn and share information. Lifelong friendships and strategic relationships are always waiting to be made.
  9. HIPAA: HIM professionals ensure protected health information is kept secure and released only to the correct individuals who have a need to know. This  protects healthcare consumers and prevents fines of millions of dollars for healthcare organizations annually.
  10. Versatility: HIM professionals are versatile and can provide many benefits to different healthcare settings including hospitals, physician offices, EMR vendors, auditors, and insurance providers among many others.

Happy HIP Week to all! Celebrate your success and that of our great HIM community!

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

What Does Health Informatics Mean to You?

Posted on March 23, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

A couple of weeks ago, I was involved in a great discussion about health informatics and what it actually entails. This wasn’t the first time I have been involved in this type of discussion as informatics has been a buzzword in healthcare for several years now. Since no two organizations are structured exactly the same, Informatics can mean different things to different people.

For me, I have seen informatics in practice as those roles involved in building and optimizing the electronic medical record (EMR) and clinical workflows. Informatics professionals ensure data is being collected appropriately so that it can be used for further healthcare decision making and operations. This was a daunting new task several years ago when Meaningful Use first came into play. I remember many articles and statistical reports stating there was a major shortage of IT professionals who were going to be needed to help organizations meet Meaningful Use criteria and perform the role of health informatics.

I do not see informaticists as being confined to any particular department of a healthcare organization but rather they are professionals that are skilled in applying technological and data science techniques to healthcare practices. I have seen many roles such as IT, HIM, and licensed clinical professionals take on informatics responsibilities to address the needs of the changing healthcare environment. Informatics needs the collaboration of these different skillsets to bridge the gap between the technology and healthcare consumer outcomes using data and research.

When we start to look at informatics as it relates to healthcare research methodologies, I believe this is where informatics starts to split off into a more refined usage of data. This goes beyond the EMR workflow optimization and into the realm of using the data to build registries, look at cause and effect relationships, and review patterns and trends in healthcare treatment and outcomes. Since most of us healthcare professionals are at different stages of EMR implementation and optimization, there are some early adopters testing the waters and beginning to understand the value of all of the healthcare data that has become readily available. I am excited to see what the future holds for health informatics and how these tasks will be aligned with the HIM professional’s skillset.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.

HIM Leadership

Posted on February 25, 2016 I Written By

Erin Head is the Director of Health Information Management (HIM) and Quality for an acute care hospital in Titusville, FL. She is a renowned speaker on a variety of healthcare and social media topics and currently serves as CCHIIM Commissioner for AHIMA. She is heavily involved in many HIM and HIT initiatives such as information governance, health data analytics, and ICD-10 advocacy. She is active on social media on Twitter @ErinHead_HIM and LinkedIn. Subscribe to Erin's latest HIM Scene posts here.

Healthcare leadership is not for the faint of heart; this is especially true in these rapidly changing times we are experiencing in healthcare. There are many different moving parts involved in not only providing medical care but in the important behind the scenes tasks that keep healthcare operations running smoothly. Health Information Management responsibilities are part of these important tasks as they cover many different, multi-layered tasks that are governed by strict laws and guidelines within hospitals, physician practices, and other healthcare roles.

Throughout the day, an HIM leader’s conversation can quickly shift between coding and revenue cycle to physician documentation and workflow to scanning records and analyzing reports to releasing information and HIPAA compliance and everything in between. We have to have a thorough understanding of all of these areas and how they overlap with other departments and providers. Of course, none of these responsibilities occur in a consistent or predictable manner on any given day.

By nature, I am a sorter and an organizer and I feel content when everything has a place. But when my daily responsibilities jump around chaotically, I start to squirm a little. Some days I can’t even begin to jot down a to-do list with prioritization because everything is urgent and important and everything is needed now. My point is not to complain about having too much to do but rather to successfully accept all of the responsibility and strategize around it. One of my favorite quotes reminds us:

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The key is to never try to do it all alone. It is not a good idea to try to do everything yourself just because it seems there is no time to train others. Having a great team to support your goals is absolutely critical. Hiring skilled HIM professionals and delegating important tasks to them will create an outlet for these professionals to use their skills and creativity to explore new ways to get the job done. The end result is typically a win-win for HIM professionals, HIM leaders, and organizational performance. Another great quote says:

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This is definitely the key to successfully accomplishing goals and objectives when they seem overwhelming and numerous. We must work smarter not harder; especially when teams are shorthanded.

I know this is probably nothing new to those in similar HIM leadership roles but it always helps to hear that you are not alone. There are probably never going to be perfect days where everything works smoothly and everything fits into its proper place. Tackle all of those tasks as best you can, delegate the responsibility, encourage teamwork, and share in the success.

If you’d like to receive future HIM posts by Erin in your inbox, you can subscribe to future HIM Scene posts here.