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Cloud – Biggest Health IT Myths

Posted on June 7, 2017 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

If you like CXO scene, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here or read through the CXO Scene archive.

So many companies are now embracing the reduced costs and agility that come with moving their data to the cloud. However, there are still so many contradictory opinions regarding which is a safer way of storing company data – on-premise storage or cloud storage? In view of this, we are going to start by dispelling the biggest IT myths that are making their rounds on the internet.

By moving your data to the cloud, you will have zero control over your technology

The fact is that by moving your data to the cloud, you can meaningfully reduce the pains and resources spent to continually upgrade software and maintain hardware. Your IT personnel can now focus on the primary business by improving operations instead of focusing on ‘Mr. Fix it’ services. Instead of a company spending a bigger chunk of its budget on expensive servers for workload and email storage, adopting the cloud can help them focus on their business strategy and support their core business in a more flexible and dynamic fashion that allows for quick responses to situations.

Storing data on premise is way safer than cloud storage

Security is principal for any business. A security breach could not only sell your trading secrets to your competitors, but it could potentially bring down your entire site and cause you to lose a lot of revenue and customer trust. It’s therefore a no brainer that the security of your business is one of the greatest concerns, especially when considering cloud storage.

With technology evolving every passing day, security has transformed into a full-time job that requires a full team of security professionals who often command handsome salaries that many businesses can’t afford. By working with a reputable cloud-based company, you get to gain first class access to one of the best security any money can buy for your business.

Cloud storage offers security against both digital and physical attacks. Additionally, most of today’s tech providers have moved to the cloud meaning we are going to see more and more innovations happening in the cloud, and you don’t want your business left out.

One thing that most people who are so against the cloud don’t consider is the fact people are the greatest security weakness of all. Every security breach is instigated by a person, and the good thing about the cloud is that it uses the latest technological developments to eliminate the need for people to man the security system.

You won’t be able to monitor your data’s sovereignty once you move to the cloud

Legally speaking, the physical location of your company can command where your business data is going to be held. For example, all public companies in Europe are required by law to store their corporate data in the European Union. This is not something that you need to worry about concerning the cloud. Most cloud providers today offer a vast range of data locations meaning you can always access one no matter where your company is located. Though sovereignty shouldn’t be any problem for you, you need to do your due diligence to ensure you remain on the right side of the law.

Moving to the cloud means you are going to have to move everything which could be very disruptive

When you start seriously considering moving vast amounts of your company’s data to the cloud, it’s easy to see why you could see it as a challenge. However, as with any change you are ever going to make in your company, you should take it slow to ensure you understand how the cloud truly works. Additionally, you and your employees will still feel like you are in control especially if you are so used to network based storage.

Now that we’ve got the myths dispelled, it’s time to seriously consider moving to the cloud. While on-premise storage is still a common phenomenon in most business, it’s not easy to ignore the fact that it is labor intensive, costly, uses a lot of energy and there’ still a chance that an insider can breach your security.

Cloud storage spells out so many more benefits aside from security. Time for you to keep up with the trend and move to the cloud.  I love it when I hear the traditional IT leader defend the position on why they want to build infrastructure and a data center, I guess the key phrase for them is Career Is Over (AKA CIO).

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

GE Healthcare Is Still In The Game

Posted on March 14, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

Below is the recent press release from GE Healthcare.  Their EMR will be used in the Rio 2016 Olympics which is a great win for GE.  The product has come a long way and they are making some great strides.  The challenge is where will the product fall in a healthcare EMR ecosystem that is predominately Epic and Cerner.   Personally I know of a few organizations that are evaluating a transition away from the GE Centricity platform due to either a merger with a bigger healthcare system that already has an enterprise EMR or they had a bad experience with Centricity and are moving on.  It will be interesting to see in the next 2-3 years how many EMR vendors we will have left.  I will definitely keep an eye on GE to see whether the recent win with the Olympic games will help create positive momentum in 2016.

LAS VEGAS–GE Healthcare announced today the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has selected the company’s Centricity Practice Solution as the official electronic medical record (EMR) to be used by the medical teams of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. This marks the first time that all athletes and spectators at the Olympic Games will have their health interactions managed by an electronic medical record. The announcement was made at the 2016 Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference in Las Vegas.

Centricity Practice Solution will be used for managing data related to injuries and illness for athletes competing in the games as well as spectators, officials, athlete family members and coaches who require medical assistance throughout the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. For the competitors, the data managed during the Games will be used to help drive optimal, individualized care to help athletes compete at a world-class level.

“The Olympic Games is about providing the best possible service to athletes,” said Dr. Richard Budgett, Medical and Scientific Director for the IOC. “The gold medal of medical services is something that is integrated and comprehensive: a total package. Adding access to an electronic medical record is key to our drive towards the prevention of injury. Without a proper medical, longitudinal record, it’s difficult for us to do surveillance and see what injuries are most common in certain sports. This would impact our ability to prevent and measure our effectiveness. The EMR is going to be a cornerstone for our medical services going forward.”

Centricity Practice Solution will be available in English and Portuguese and will provide access to next generation workflows, analytics and data to potentially help optimize athlete performance. The information will be analyzed to spot patterns and provide insights for future Games planning. Additionally, medical teams will be able to access diagnostic images and reports from within the EMR to assist in providing world-class care quickly and efficiently. GE’s EMR will be accessible at any of the multiple medical posts throughout the Games and at the central Polyclinic in the Olympic Village where more complex care is delivered.

“By selecting Centricity Practice Solutions EMR, the IOC is extending the clinical care and data management capabilities pioneered by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), which has used GE’s EMR platform for the past two Olympic Games in London and Sochi,” said Jon Zimmerman, General Manager, GE Centricity Business Solutions. “Incorporating an EMR platform into the healthcare services will enable medical staff at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games access to real time data, analytics and health information to help their athletes perform at peak capabilities.”

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

The Amazon Echo – Bringing Sci Fi Reality to Healthcare

Posted on February 16, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

My initial impression of the Amazon Echo was that this is simply a Bluetooth speaker that looks like a portable humidifier with a little bit of artificial intelligence. The next thing I discovered is that the Echo always needs to be plugged in for it to work. But then, after playing around with it, I realized that the Amazon Echo is actually quite impressive.

The Echo introduces the handy Alexa function. The initial conversations with Alexa are very simple. You can ask about the weather, the time, sports results, or the latest news. But with time, I learned that Alexa could even read an audio book; tell me about the local businesses; and where to go for a Thai dinner.

The other benefit of Echo its accessibility and quality. It comes with a remote control or you may control it via your mobile device after downloading the Amazon echo app. The bottom part of the Echo has a 360-degree speaker that surprisingly fills the entire room with sound. Even at a distance of 9-10 feet Alexa can pick up commands.

Because of the sophisticated voice activated system, the Echo has great potential for use by patients in a healthcare setting. The main use case that I see is in the hospital’s patient room. Let’s think of a scenario where we have a 50-year-old patient in the hospital that had just gone through a surgery procedure and is expected to be in the hospital for two days. Echo can be a great device to allow personalization such as: integration to the patient’s Spotify music, control of the room temperature and blinds, the ability to order an Uber for the patient’s family, as well as many other features of a smart home. The goal will be to bring the technology of a smart home into a patient’s room to enhance the patient’s experience away from home.

From a clinical perspective, the Echo can assist the medical provider by reciting the medical education transcribed by the doctor to the patient, such as: the side effects of a prescription drug that the patient should expect for the next month after surgery. If we go back to the example of the patient who is recovering from surgery and has been prescribed drugs, the Echo can either be a replacement or an integrated device for the nurse call system where the patient can ask for pain medication through Echo. In addition, patients can also order their meals through the device if it is integrated with the dietary system in the hospital. As such, the voice-activated system would clearly be a great two-way communication tool for the patient who may not be able to move from their bed with ease.

As healthcare is moving towards the goal of creating the best patient experience possible, we have to start integrating consumer products with the strategy of providing a hotel-like experience in an inpatient room. The integration of smart room technology and voice activation communication has become an invaluable part of luxury hotels, and likewise, we must attempt to replicate that same kind of technology and convenience in hospitals.   I have personally witnessed a lot of success by international hospitals incorporating the hotel experience into their culture to improve patient experience. Similarly, I believe that hospitals in the US must start to adjust our strategy in order to meet the expectation of today’s consumer-patients.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Revival of the Physician-Patient Relationships via Electronic Technology

Posted on February 9, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

One of the latest fads in healthcare is patient-engagement. This is not a new concept at all, but has been practiced in some form for decades. However, with the availability of electronic technology, physicians and healthcare institutions have now embarked on new ways to engage patients. For many years now, there has been a discord in patient-physician relationships. Patients have often felt that healthcare workers never spend adequate time on their cases, rarely allowing them to participate in any decisions and almost never explaining the details about their medical disorders. This bitterness has led many patients to seek alternative healthcare options.

There is now preliminary evidence that use of electronic technology can help improve patient-doctor relationships and also lead to effective treatments and better outcomes.  Patient engagement using electronic technology is also not a new concept. It was first attempted when the Internet was developed in the mid 90s, but failed to gather storm because the technology was relatively new and there was no such thing as androids. The available mobile phones of that time were largely redundant devices that were only used for communication.

Today, almost every healthcare institution and many healthcare workers have web pages that provide educational information to patients. This was the first step in engaging patients. However, with the present availability of mobile devices, the healthcare industry has been able to leap forward. Many clinics now have Apps that give patients access to information, such as: when the doctor will be in the office; how long the wait will be in the ER; possible diagnoses of medical disorders; billing information; and future appointments. Some healthcare practitioners have gone one step further and even offer teleconferencing for patients who are not able to make it to their appointments.

The current strengthening of the patient-physician relationship is further evidenced by the fact that doctors are now encouraging patients to play a greater role in their healthcare and make informed decisions. Shared decision making is now a universal theme in many healthcare institutions. Patient portals can help patients better manage their chronic disorders like diabetes, arthritis, asthma or hypertension. More importantly, this method of engaging patients allows for faster responses from healthcare workers, who now have dedicated staff to answer mobiles phone queries from patients. For example, pharmacists are now able to use mobile technology to help patients better manage their medications, by recording their intake and advising the patients on how to avoid drug interactions.

With the rise of electronic technology, many patients now have most of their medical information, such as medical history and list of medication, stored on their mobile devices which makes it easier to share with healthcare workers when necessary. This dynamic flow of information not only streamlines care, but also fosters continuous and consistent care between the patient and physician. An example of this continuous care may be found in software programs that identify patients in need of particular services, such as annual mammograms, pap smears and chest x-rays. Once these patients are identified, the healthcare workers are able to contact them right away to advise the patient of their specific required medical service, while the software system assists in preventing missed appointments by sending reminders.

Notwithstanding the above, however, patient engagement via use of electronic technology is not without problems. The first and foremost problem is security. Mobile phones routinely get misplaced or stolen and the medical data could easily fall into wrong hands. Secondly, the elderly who make up for the majority of patients in the USA are not usually tech savvy, with very few of them using such mobile devices. Even those who do have a mobile phone are not well versed with Apps or retrieving medical information online.

Additionally, in order for mobile devices to be effective for patient engagement, the healthcare workers need to be efficient in supporting the technology to capitalize on its potential benefits. Even today, one of the most common complaints made by patients is that healthcare providers often times do not return phone calls in a timely manner or even at all. So in order to engage patients, healthcare workers also need to be play an active role. Just sending medical information to a mobile device is not what patients want.

No matter how advanced technology has become, patient engagement via electronic means will never replace the soothing voice or touch of a healthcare provider in the office. It is clear that patient engagement is vital for a successful physician-patient relationship. In fact, there is strong evidence that patients who participate actively in their own care have better medical outcomes and fruitful relationships with their healthcare provider. However, it is important to remember that patient engagement is a two way street. Electronic technology can do wonders for healthcare providers and healthcare institutions, but make no mistake, it can also become a detriment very quickly if not applied and supported adequately. In essence, healthcare providers must remember that current electronic technology can only serve as an assisting tool in managing patients – it cannot act as the healthcare provider itself.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Tips For Young Healthcare Executives Managing Older Experienced Staff

Posted on February 2, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

These days, it is not uncommon to see fresher and younger talents tackle management positions and working together with the more experienced and older colleagues. The number of executives that hold high corporate ranks while still in their 20s-30s has impressively grown through the years, despite the fact that seniority is generally a determining factor for promotion opportunities. This shifting corporate culture may bring about many different challenges to organizations, since younger CEOs and executives may struggle with supervising their employees, who are 10-20 years their senior. These older employees could feel discomfited when reporting to their younger employers and having to take directions from them. Nonetheless, there are several strategies that I have used in these situations, which may assist in bringing harmony and balance to these relationships.

Be clear with what you expect
Only the head of the department will be able to set the tone for the culture of the organization. It is the head of the department who will determine what will and will not be tolerated among the employees and the leadership team. As a young leader, whether you are the CEO, CIO, COO, CXO, or any other head of the department, you must be clear with the expectation and directions. Act like the leader of the department or of your team and communicate as much as possible to avoid any ambiguity.

Communicate consistently
One way of establishing better rapport with the older employees is to develop an understanding about their motivations, working attitude, needs, and values. To gain understanding, it is important that the employer and employees have regular conversations. A clear understanding of the employees’ motivations is critical for you to develop the organizational strategy. Your management strategy for an employee who is two years away from retiring is going to be a whole lot different from that for an employee who still has another ten or more years ahead of them before retirement.

However, as the head of the department, I believe that it is important to put the organization as a whole first before individual team members. In this regard, you should still strive to do what is best for both parties and always sympathize with the employee by putting yourself in their shoes and treating them the same way that you would like to be treated if the situation was reversed.

Address their weaknesses supportively
Younger executives should not be afraid to acknowledge the older employees’ weaknesses in a supportive manner. While it may be a widespread belief that older employees are likely to resist learning new things and are less likely to succeed in the digital era, I believe that this is a misconception. From my experience, there are actually a number of older workers who are more than eager to embrace new technologies. You will be able to encourage and assist such older employees to adapt to the new digital generation and be more comfortable with the technological changes by supporting them through use of manual demonstrations, tutorials, and various training programs.   Give these employees the benefit of the doubt and be patient, while assisting and insisting upon their endeavor to engage in learning and applying new technologies in this digital era. The experience must be a positive one to motivate any individual to change.

Tap their experience
Notwithstanding the above, older employees who choose to remain in the work place, even if they are approaching retirement age, also have a lot to offer to the department. They may be able to provide the younger leaders with valuable information and insight from their years of experience in the field. Having their experience tapped through executive mentoring in which the older colleagues are offering guidance and advice on certain cases could help you shape better strategies. Everyone has a story to tell and a lesson to teach that may be valuable for any leader, young or old. In turn, this form of communication could make the older employees feel appreciated and motivated.

Find balance and harmony
Notwithstanding the above, as a young leader, you still need to be clear with the older employees that, while you are giving value to their experience, you are still the leader of the team and the ultimate decision-maker. This requires a delicate balance between strength and sensitivity – specifically, a balance between being a strong leader and a sensitive mentor.

There are many approaches younger leaders can take to work well and successfully with older employees in a department. Some of these approaches have already been enumerated above. However, no matter what strategies are adopted, the key to being an effective young leader is to treat all employees with respect and dignity, while maintaining your authority. This way you will be able to ensure balance and harmony in your department, which will result in a strong work culture and successful operations in the business.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Great Healthcare IT Leaders

Posted on January 25, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

As we prepare for the upcoming HIMSS conference on Feb 29 – Mar 4, 2016, I encourage the community to connect with these top thought leaders who will go above and beyond in engaging with the community. Looking forward to catching up in Vegas.
himss16 cio

Aaron Miri CIO at Walnut Hill Medical Center @AaronMiri 
Anna Turman CIO at Chadron Community Hospital and Health Services @iamTurman
Chad Eckes Board Member at NC HIMSS
Chris Belmont CIO at MD Anderson Cancer Center @CBelmont88 
Cletis Earle CIO at St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital
Cris Ross CIO at Mayo Clinic
Darren Dworkin CIO at Cedar Sinai Medical Center @DworkinDarren
Dave Miller CIO at Optimum Healthcare IT @dlmilleroptimum
Dick Escue CIO at Valley View Hospital
Drex DeFord CIO Advisor @drexdeford 
Edward Marx CIO at The Advisory Board @marxists
Gareth Sherlock CIO at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi
Gene Thomas CIO at Memorial Hospital of Gulfport
James Brady CIO, Kaiser Permanente Orange County
Jay Ferro CIO at American Cancer Center @jayferro 
John Delano CIO at Integris health
John Halamka CIO at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center @jhalamka
John Jay Kenagy CIO at Legacy Health
Jon Manis CIO at Sutter Health
Joseph Hobbs Regional CIO at NetApp @JOEtheCIO 
Kristin Darby CIO at Cancer Treatment Centers of America @khdarby
Marc Chasin CIO & CMIO at St. Luke’s Health System @M_Chasin
Marc Probst CIO at Intermountain Health @probst_marc
Michael Archuleta CIO at MT San Rafael Hospital @Michael81082
Mike Reagin CIO at Sentara Healthcare
Patrick Anderson CIO at Hoag Memorial
Pravene Nath CIO at Stanford Health @pravenenath
Robin Sarkar CIO at Lakeland Regional Health System
Sarah Richardson CIO at NCH Healthcare System @conciergeleader 
Scott Maclean Deputy CIO at Partners Health @stmaclean
Shafiq Rab CIO at Hackensack University Medical Center @CIOSHAFIQ
Steve Huffman CIO at Beacon Health System @SteveHuffman_IN
Steve Stanic CIO at Baptist Health (Jackson, MS)
Sue Schade CIO Advisor @sgschade 
Todd Richardson CIO at Aspirus
Will Weider CIO at Ministry Health @CandidCIO 

Let us know if you think there’s someone else you think we should add to the list. We always love to learn about new people that are worth following.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Social Media 101 For Healthcare CXOs – Part 2

Posted on January 14, 2016 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

This is a follow up to my last blog post regarding social media for CXOs.   I increased my action on social networking sites around four years ago when another new employment in Abu Dhabi forced a vast physical separation between me, my colleagues and critical emerging trends in healthcare IT back in the United States. I’ve been a daily Twitter and LinkedIn client from that point forward.

Social media provided the platform to build up solid associations and relationships with different influencers and pioneers in the industry. I also utilize social media to recruit talent, promote the organization’s achievements, speak internally with staff, and update everyone on rising trends.

Leaders who have a big department may not have the capacity to converse with each individual worker. I attempt to use social as one of the communication tool in addition to face-to-face time in order to share my thoughts about where we’re going from a strategy initiatives perspective. I also use the channel to share articles related to industry trends so people can keep up with what’s going on in the market.

My day by day online networking routine starts in the early mornings, before work, and after that continue in full drive following my workday. Social networking is not something you can simply say, ‘I’m going to go through an hour with it”,  You truly live it in small increments throughout your day.

Twitter as dynamic news feed
Twitter is currently my go-to news feed in the morning, and I utilize it to locate the most recent updates, news articles and critique on the healthcare business. Twitter is a decent place for individuals to share thoughts, or what’s at the forefront from the various industry thought leaders.  The majority of the Fortune 500 companies’ CEOs or executive groups are on Twitter sharing what’s happening to their businesses, and what’s happening with their organizations. This forum is a great place where you can get a genuine glimpse from the thought leader’s perspectives.  

I consider social important, however I don’t feel the need to post, or check in consistently.  On the off chance that I have a five-minute or 10-minute gap, I will examine what’s going on. I’ll check my notifications. However, I’m not always on my telephone checking the social stream.

LinkedIn for networking and career success
During the previous year, I began blogging, and I tried to routinely share thoughts on LinkedIn’s publishing platform. I appreciate the feedback I get on industry-specific topics and leadership. LinkedIn likewise allows me make and reinforce proficient connections for networking opportunities and professional success.

My Tips
Let me offer a few tips for CXOs who need to hone their social media methodologies from my experience.  First, CXOs ought to do all that they can to cooperate with their social connections. Use social to drive engagement, whether it’s with your associates, your staff or even your bosses. Listening is also key, and CXOs ought to grasp at the chance to act as a sounding boards for others. You truly need to listen and see what’s out there since many have alternate points of view that can expand your thinking on a topic.  

Lastly, CXOs have to invest the time to decide how social tools function best for them.   As I mentioned earlier, social can be an incredible tool for recruiting, department branding and personal branding. However, it takes exertion and work. It’s not something you can benefit from simply because you made a Twitter account and sat back waiting for people to follow you.

For me, social media is mostly a conduit for learning and a springboard to test ideas. Plus, it’s a platform to connect and engage with new thought leaders. If you are looking to jump start your learning and engagement, I definitely encourage everyone to get on a social media platform and start connecting and having discussions. Take the initial step to connect with others. You can start your initial discussion with me on the various social platforms I am using: Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.

Hospital CIO David Chou’s Top 3 Focuses for 2016

Posted on December 28, 2015 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

As we wrap up 2015, here are three main focus areas that IT leaders must be prepared for in 2016

Mega Mergers / Affiliations are going to continue across the nation. Healthcare institutions realize that it pays to be big and it will be important to have the organizational size in order to be a player in the market. Almost every type of conceivable partnership is on track for the upcoming year. We have seen partnership between competitors (Kaiser and Dignity Health) that were unthinkable a few years ago. These types of creative partnership and affiliation will enable healthcare providers to regain the advantage against insurers when negotiating reimbursements and also gain best practices from each other to improve quality of care. We will also continue to see community hospitals collaborate with top tier healthcare systems and academic medical centers to generate more consumer options. To control costs, tertiary hospitals are rapidly moving care with lower acuity levels to the community hospitals.

Emerging Technologies such as smart-phones and patient tracking devices are catching on in healthcare and they will become the standard. Besides telling patients about the wait times in the emergency rooms, these devices are now also being used for telemedicine to make home visits and perform diagnosis of non-emergent medical disorders. Consumers are now storing their health information, list of medications and even the costs of treatment on smart-phones. With the smart-phones, consumers will be able to access their health records anywhere anytime. Smart-phones will also allow the ability to speak to a doctor and/or let the doctor see the patient remotely to deliver care from the doctor’s office to the patient’s location. Surveys indicate that the use of mobile devices for maintenance of medical health have doubled in just the past 2 years and many consumers will prefer to use their smart phones to connect to their healthcare provider in the coming year. The biggest question that remains to be seen is how patients and hospitals will manage security on these devices!

Data Security and patient privacy issues are always a concern. Because of the threat from hackers, almost every major medical device will need to have security features to prevent breaches that could cripple the industry. Consumers have already started to become weary of buying any new medical devices and hesitant to use what is available in hospitals because of recent hacking reports. Physician’s office and hospitals will have to step up and ensure there are no breaches in security. Otherwise, the penalties will be severe. More important, it can ruin the reputation of a hospital and lead to a decline in patients.

What are your top 3 focuses in 2016?

Let’s Connect On Facebook and Twitter @dchou1107.

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Social Media 101 For Healthcare CXOs

Posted on December 21, 2015 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

Social media has been a channel that has been overlooked by executives in the past, but I am starting to see the shift in the trend now. I get questioned a lot from many of my peers and colleagues as to how they should start their social engagement and what are some tips for executive users. The сhоісеѕ in social mеdіа саn bе оvеr-whеlmіng and there аrе ѕо mаnу ѕіtеѕ tо сhооѕе frоm that it can be hard to know where to start. Plus, іf writing іѕn’t part оf уоur еvеrуdау рrасtісе it саn bе a сhаllеngе tо thіnk аbоut аddіng a wrіtіng rоutіnе tо a buѕу ѕсhеdulе filled with back to back meetings all day. Sаvе уоurѕеlf time аnd fаіlеd еffоrtѕ. Here’s some common quеѕtіоnѕ tо give you a hеаd-ѕtаrt оn dеvеlоріng уоur ѕосіаl mеdіа strategy:

Whо Am I Cоnnесtіng Wіth?
Whеthеr уоu are a CEO, CIO, COO, or any CXO role in the organization, іt’ѕ іmроrtаnt tо decide whо уоu wіll bе соnnесtіng wіth. Iѕ уоur іntеnt tо buіld rеlаtіоnѕhірѕ wіth juѕt уоur staff members or customers? Or dо you want to be more engaged with your peers? This answer will dictate the strategy of defining your personal brand on the social media channels.

Whаt Wіll I Pоѕt?
Dау tо dау rесарѕ lіkе “I juѕt wаlkеd thе dоg” do nоt quаlіfу аѕ professional роѕtѕ оn ѕосіаl mеdіа ассоuntѕ. In fасt, thеу ѕhоuld bе avoided ѕо уоur fоllоwеrѕ dоn’t get the wrоng іdеа аbоut уоur рrоfеѕѕіоnаlіѕm. If уоu dіdn’t сrеаtе a ѕtrаtеgу bеfоrе уоu started uѕіng ѕосіаl mеdіа, thеn іt’ѕ time tо rеgrоuр аnd соmе uр wіth a рlаn. Chооѕе уоur ѕubjесt mаttеr аnd fіnd quаlіtу ѕоurсеѕ fоr tорісаl nеwѕ аnd іnfоrmаtіоn tо ѕhаrе wіth уоur connections.

Whаt is YOUR Sосіаl Mеdіа Pоlісу?
Who will you connect with on the social media channels? Are you going to connect with everyone? My recommendation is to use social as a vehicle to communicate with the world. If you don’t build up a personal brand and maintain a strong social media presence, you are missing out on the connection opportunity.

Hоw Wіll People Knоw I’m Aсtіvе іn Sосіаl Mеdіа?
Yоu hаvе tо аѕѕumе thаt реорlе wоn’t knоw уоu аrе роѕtіng unlеѕѕ уоu tеll thеm. If уоu’rе ѕеndіng оut еіthеr a рrіntеd nеwѕlеttеr оr аn еmаіl nеwѕlеttеr, аѕk for fоllоwеrѕ! If your рrасtісе sends bіrthdау саrdѕ, lеt thеm knоw thеу саn ѕtау bеttеr іn tоuсh thrоughоut thе уеаr vіа social mеdіа аnd nаmе thе ассоunt уоu use. Yоu саn uѕе office rесоrdѕ tо dеvеlор a lіѕt оf соnnесtіоnѕ tо mаkе. In thе іnvіtаtіоn tо соnnесt, juѕt bе ѕurе tо іnсludе іn a lіnk аnd еxрlаnаtіоn оf уоur іntеnt аnd рrіvасу роlісу tо hеlр еаѕе роѕѕіblе раtіеnt соnсеrnѕ.  Stay tuned for the next blog on my personal strategy for social media. Make sure we are connected on the various channels below:

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Pros and Cons of Healthcare IT Outsourcing

Posted on December 4, 2015 I Written By

David Chou is the Vice President / Chief Information & Digital Officer for Children’s Mercy Kansas City. Children’s Mercy is the only free-standing children's hospital between St. Louis and Denver and provide comprehensive care for patients from birth to 21. They are consistently ranked among the leading children's hospitals in the nation and were the first hospital in Missouri or Kansas to earn the prestigious Magnet designation for excellence in patient care from the American Nurses Credentialing Center Prior to Children’s Mercy David held the CIO position at University of Mississippi Medical Center, the state’s only academic health science center. David also served as senior director of IT operations at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi and CIO at AHMC Healthcare in California. His work has been recognized by several publications, and he has been interviewed by a number of media outlets. David is also one of the most mentioned CIOs on social media, and is an active member of both CHIME and HIMSS. Subscribe to David's latest CXO Scene posts here and follow me at Twitter Facebook.

Recently Black Book issued a report stating that CFOs, CIOs both favor outsourcing for technology. Outsourcing is not new to healthcare information technology and it has been practiced for decades. However, with the healthcare scenery changing rapidly, outsourcing of IT has again gained prominence. Introducing technology to a healthcare organization can be an expensive undertaking and thus, outsourcing may be the way to go. One of the main reasons why outsourcing is attractive is because it helps put together resources quickly and reduces the time to market when implementing technology.

Besides cost, other reasons for outsourcing include increased flexibility, organization inability to further develop staff quickly and there may be a cash flow problem in keeping an employee long term. Building a trusted relationship with a vendor is key and someone must monitor their performance to hold the vendor accountable. One needs to weigh the pros and cons before proceeding to outsourcing because it is not without risks.

Outsourcing Tips:

  1. Lower cost is often the single most influential factor when deciding on offshore outsourcing. Some of the world’s largest organization use contract employees or foreign labor to perform the commodity work. This also reduces the need for full time employees.
  2. Outsourcing is ideal when you need a 24×7 workforce. Outsourcing is an easier method to augment your existing staff in order to manage the 24 hour operation we require in healthcare.
  3. With outsourcing, it is usually easier to transition and move temporary staff because they do not have permanent ties with your organization
  4. In certain countries, there are rules and regulations that govern privacy and intellectual property; when you outsource outside of geographical boundaries, you will need to pay closer attention to data export regulations.
  5. You must manage the internal staff culture and feelings about outsourcing. Most personnel will view outsourcing as a threat to their job, so leaders must be transparent when they are outsourcing projects or tasks.
  6. The outsource contract must be clear and concise as to the roles and responsibilities of each party. The arrangement will fail quickly if both parties are not clear on this.

I believe that successful departments and organization can utilize outsourcing as a competitive advantage if it is managed appropriately, but there has to be a dedicated resource managing the vendor relationship. I have managed both an outsourced IT department along with insourced staff. The key is to have transparent leadership which treats every employee (outsource, and insource) the same. Clear communication is definitely required from the leader.

If you’d like to receive future health care C-Level executive posts by David in your inbox, you can subscribe to future Health Care CXO Scene posts here.