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Health Exchanges Pose Added Stress For Hospital IT Departments

Posted on September 30, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

There’s no doubt that hospital IT departments have their hands full already, what with Meaningful Use and ICD-10 hovering over them like a huge black cloud. But as one Information Week story reminds us, there’s another big project in the wings which could add even more to their plate.

The IW story, which offers intelligence from the American Hospital Association and several consultants, notes that the coming of health exchanges and the accompanying Medicaid expansion in some states will have a substantial effect on hospital IT departments.

For one thing, the story reports, with a flood of newly insured Americans arriving at the door, hospitals will need to enhance their revenue cycle management systems, as the number of health plans with which they do business should rise meaningfully.

Hospitals will need to deal with the fact that some patients who buy insurance on the exchanges will have high deductibles and copayments, in some cases as high as $5,000 or $6,000. Given these deductibles, it will be crucial for hospitals to determine what kind of coverage patients have. Many hospitals will end up upgrading their RCM systems to better interface with managed care plans.

Unfortunately, even that won’t assure payment. As the IW story points out, even a direct connection to the insurance company in question may not do the job, as eligibility information from health plans is often 30 – 90 days out of date. “So if patients miss two premium payments and are no longer covered — but the data says they are covered, and the hospital proceeds accordingly — the bill never gets paid,” according to Thad Glavin, senior director of the Advisory Board’s RCM division, who spoke with the magazine.

Still, hospitals will need more and better connections with health plans even if the information they get in return is questionable. Sure, despite the risks that come with the change in insurance under the Affordable Care Act, I wager that hospitals’ steely focus on Meaningful Use and ICD–10 will leave RCM projects shortchanged at first. But as the high-deductible bills keep building up, hospitals will squeeze in new RCM system development. I give it six months to twelve months, max.

EHRs Can Generate Meaningful Return On Investment

Posted on September 27, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Well-implemented EMRs can certainly generate Meaningful Use incentive payoffs, but that’s far from the only way that they can help a practice generate return on their EHR investment.

According to “Return on Investment in EHRs,” a whitepaper sponsored by GBS, HP, Intel and Nextgen, properly implemented EHRs can do a great deal to generate ROI for medical practice above and beyond qualifying them for MU payoffs.

The paper notes that many practices have achieved a return on investment in their EHRs without receiving external incentives. As it points out, a Health Affairs study from 2005 found that while initial EHR costs averaged $44,000 per full-time equivalent, and ongoing costs averaged $8,500 per provider per year, the average practice paid for EHR costs in 2.5 years and generated a profit after that.

Eleven of the 14 practices studied by Health Affairs had “tightly integrated” EHR and practice management systems, a factor the paper contends was highly relevant to their success with their EHR implementation. Not only did providers use the EHR for common tasks, almost all used it to help with billing. Ten of the practices no longer pull paper charts at all, the study noted.

EHRs also improve efficiency and productivity in the following ways, the paper argues:

* More appropriate coding: Properly-designed EHRs help physicians with coding by displaying the appropriate code based on the documentation entered during a patient encounter. This avoids costly undercoding.

* Greater efficiency: The use of point-and-click templates lessens and in some cases eliminates transcription costs, which can be up to 11 percent of collections.

* Reduction in soft costs: Fully-enabled EHRs also remove many “soft costs” that practices occur, such as the time it takes to call in prescriptions. Also, once doctors learn how to use the EHR, they can complete most of the notes during or between patient visits, leaving them with time to either see more patients or go home earlier.

It’s great to think that medical practices can generate ROI on their EHR investment, but given that the sponsors of this paper have their own agenda, I’m not taking everything they say at face value. What do you think, readers? Have you seen situations in which practice EHRs generate significant ROI independently of what they take in in Meaningful Use dollars?

Technology and Focusing on the Patient Video

Posted on September 26, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had a chance to sit down with Dr. Nick van Terheyden, CMIO at Nuance Healthcare, to discuss some of the latest topics in healthcare IT: meaningful use stage 2, ACOs, ICD-10, and patient engagement. Dr. Nick gives a lot of valuable insights into healthcare IT trends and also the shift to a more patient focused healthcare environment. I hope you enjoy the video interview with Dr. Nick embedded below:

You can see a full list of future and past live video interviews on our EHR Video Interview Schedule.

Lessons Learned from Sutter’s EHR Implementation Challenges

Posted on September 25, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of our more popular recent posts was published on EMR and HIPAA and was titled, “Adding Insult To Injury, Sutter’s Epic EMR Crashes For A Day.” When the post was shared on LinkedIn, it prompted a really insightful discussion on EMR training and Sutter’s approach to EHR implementation. A few of the comments were so good that I wanted to share them for more people to read and learn.

The first comment is from Scott Kennedy, an Epic Stork Trainer:

I was an Epic training consultant on the E. Bay Sutter EHR implementation and I can tell you first hand that Sutter Admin, and the Nurses are at odds. This unfortunate relationship made it difficult to train the staff. Epic itself is not to blame. Those who are using the Epic EHR are not as trained as they should be.

Sutter used an “in house” training team rather than bringing on a full consulting team with much more experience in training and educating end users. The “in house’ trainers included some nurses, RTs, and the like as well as a host of newly graduated college students who had less to no experience with conducting a formal training presentation on a multidisciplinary EHR.

Hiring and training “in house” is a great addition to bringing on an experienced, skilled, professional team of Epic credentialed trainers, like myself who do this as a profession all over the country.

We were also directed by Sutter EHR implementation Administration to “facilitate” rather than “train.” “Facilitate included passing out exercise booklets to the clinical end users and having them work on their own, rather than conducing concise, lectured, guided practice prior to each exercise. Hands on exercises are an essential part of the training, but should not be the complete focus of training.

The learner is left on their own to figure out the system, which is counter productive. That approach only builds anxiety, confusion and eventual resentment for the system and the administration who have chosen the EHR they are fumbling through.

I empathize with the clinical end users. There training experience could have been much more instrumental in getting them off on the right foot with their new EHR, had the training approach been more adult learning theory based rather than self-learning based.

I only wish I could come back to Sutter and retrain the nurses and other clinicians from the proven, consistent, progressive, successful adult learning approach, which enables and empowers the end user to grasp, comprehend and assimilate the EHR system into their daily shift work flow. That is not to say that there are not implementation bumps and optimization needs that have to be addressed, but they are far less impactful when the clinician is properly trained.

I am so sorry Sutter nurses and staff that I trained, but I was firmly told to “facilitate” your learning rather than “train” you. I tried to implement adult learning methodology, but was told by your EHR administration to “stop talking and let them do it on their own.”

Epic EHR is not to blame here. Epic is a sound, EHR system that is serving the needs of millions of patients and their care providers around the world, without incidents such as those being experienced at Sutter.

There is a right way to implement and train and a wrong way. Sorry Sutter EHR implementation administration, but “I told you so!”

I asked Scott Kennedy if he’d thought of leaving the project since it was being done the wrong way and he offered the following response:

@ John, yes I did come very close to leaving the project. As a matter of fact after I was verbally “scolded” for lecturing to much I phoned my recruiter and asked to be placed on another project, but then, after careful thought, I decided to stay on the project and attempt to train and support as much as I could. But it seems that my individual efforts were not enough to counter the original training “facilitation” focus.

To add insult to injury those of us trainers who were there for the Sutter E. Bay implementation were told not to return for the W. Bay implementation. The EHR administration wanted an entirely new outside consulting team.

I got a fellow colleague on the project, hoping that the E. Bay administration would have learned from and the current W. Bay implementation would be better. The training colleague I got on the W. Bay project shared with me that it was worse than the E. Bay implementation. They kept the experienced Epic trainers as support and utilized them as little as possible for actual front end training. So sad, really.

The EHR administration at Sutter tried to cut every financial corner possible and lost sight of the long run implications of improper front end training. Now they are paying the price.

Michael A. P., an EMR consultant offered this insight as well:

I’ve also had the misfortune of working with Sutter for a (thankfully) brief period. In their long history of attempting to implement Epic, they could be counted on to make the wrong decision in almost every situation. Their internal politics trump the advice they receive from vendors and highly experienced consultants. The result is an implementation that serves neither the patient or the users best interests.

Then, Ryan Thousand, an IT Architect at Athens Regional Medical Center, offered a broader view of what’s happening in health IT and EHR:

I hate to say it but most large healthcare organizations are getting like this as well…. There are WAY too many layers in these organizations and sometimes to get work done can mean 4 weeks of executive meetings and in the end no decision or 100% opposite of the recommended direction given. That being said, with the rapid change in healthcare and the mergers and acquisitions occurring right now, I fear the worries for Healthcare in general over the next couple of years. We cannot continue to try to meet mandates the government is making while still ensuring 100% utmost patient care; and in the end that is really all I care about.. the patient in the bed who is BENEFITING from my implementation. Change is always tough but done the right way with the right people (as you all stated above was not done correctly) we will continue to see great things happen on the HIT side. But unless Epic/Cerner all the big players in the markets as well as the local clinician and providers work together and decide the best outcomes for our patients, we will all one day suffer, as we will all one day be patients.

In all the years I’ve been writing about EMR and EHR, the biggest problem with most EMR implementations is lack of EHR training or poor EHR training. It’s really amazing the impact quality EHR training can have on an implementation. However, many organizations use that as a way to save money. If they could only see the long term costs of that choice.

EHR Training Suggestions

Posted on September 24, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my recent post about EHR optimization, Heather Haugen from The Breakaway Group (A Xerox company) offered some really interesting insights into the challenges of EHR implementations and the ongoing training that has to happen to really have a successful EHR outcome. In the video embedded in that blog post, Heather also offered some other interesting insights to how you measure and address your EHR training.

For example, when you’re asking people if they’ve completed the training, you want to be careful how you ask the question and how you respond to their answer. You want to make sure that you don’t come off as accusatory. People shouldn’t feel like you’re on a witch hunt trying to find and punish those who haven’t completed the training (my words, not Heather’s). Instead, you should focus your questions and responses on understanding why the EMR training hasn’t been completed. Maybe there are some legitimate reasons why users couldn’t do their EMR training. You’ll never find out those reasons if they see you as accusatory.

Heather also suggested a really key insight to first time EHR user experience. A successful first time EHR user experience increases confidence. A failed first time EHR experience leads to decreased confidence.

Your EHR training should focus on ensuring that the first time someone uses the EHR they gain confidence on using the software. Increased user confidence will go a long way in helping users pick up the more advanced parts of the EHR training. However, decreased confidence will build a wall that will make future training much more challenging.

I thought these were some great insights into EHR training and implementation. What other things have you found in your experiences with EMR training?

Facebook Like Now Covered by the First Amendment – Applications for Healthcare

Posted on September 23, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A big court case, Bland v. Roberts, has recently ruled that the Facebook Like is now covered by the first amendment. This was an overturn of a previous lower court ruling. Here’s the summary of the case from The Atlantic:

In November of 2009, B.J. Roberts, the sheriff of Hampton, Virginia, ran for re-election. A group of workers in Roberts’ office, however, among them one Bobby Bland, weren’t enthused about the prospects of their boss’s continuation in his role. So they took to their Facebook accounts to protest the run: They Liked the campaign of Roberts’s opponent, Jim Adams. Despite the minuscule mutiny, however, Roberts won the election. He then chose not to retain Bland and the others as his employees. The dismissals, Roberts said at the time, were the result not only of budgeting concerns, but also of the workers’ hindrance of “the harmony and efficiency of the office.” The sheriff had not liked his workers’ Likes.

Bland and his colleagues took Roberts to court, arguing that, in the dismissals, Roberts had violated their First Amendment rights. In April of 2012, however, the U.S. District Court of Eastern Virginia dismissed the case on the grounds that a Like didn’t involve an “actual statement,” and therefore was “insufficient speech to merit constitutional protection.”

Yesterday, however, that decision was overturned. A federal appeals court ruled that a Facebook Like is, indeed, a form of expression that is covered by the First Amendment. Clicking a button is, per the decision, a protected form of speech.

Of course, those reading this must be wondering how this applies to healthcare.

Some of you might remember last month when several Spectrum Health employees were terminated over a picture posted to Facebook. The employee who posted the picture was fired and so was everyone who liked it.

I’m not saying that these cases are the same. Posting a picture that could be considered a violation of HIPAA and could be a violation of an organizations social media policy is different than a police officer liking an opposing Sheriff’s page. However, I wouldn’t want to be Spectrum Health if the employees who liked the Facebook photo brought a wrongful termination lawsuit. There are a lot of intricacies to a case that covers so many areas of the law.

In another international example, 15 nurses were fired from a hospital for liking someone’s comment which was critical of the hospital. Certainly the Philippines has different laws than we have in the US. However, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a similar thing happen in the US. Considering the latest ruling, I’d be really careful if I were a hospital firing someone based on social media.

My favorite thing is when healthcare organizations try and control and restrict social media. As many institutions have learned, that’s impossible to do. Instead, it’s much more effective to educate and inform people on their use of social media. The best reason you should educate and inform as opposed to control and restrict is the message it sends to your employees. The former sends a message of trust and respect while the later does the opposite.

Is EHR Optimization Possible?

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At the Healthcare Forum Heather Haugen, PhD posited that the Promise of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) is that it “has the potential to transform healthcare by providing clinicians access to comprehensive medical information that is secure, standardized and shared.”  She then proceeded to remind us how far we have come on the journey of adoption, but that we still haven’t gotten where we need to be.  EHR is indeed a lofty goal, but we haven’t gotten there yet.

Plus, Dr. Haugen suggested that far too many people are focused on the EHR implementation and yet that’s only one milestone along the EHR journey.  In fact, she compared looking at EHR implementation numbers to talking about the number of weddings as opposed to the success of those weddings.  EHR implementations are just an event, but we continue to talk about the wedding instead of the marriage.

When you start to look at EHR as a journey, the first steps of Selecting, Building, and Installing are relatively short parts of the journey.  However, the EHR journey also includes: leadership engagement, speed to proficiency, performance metrics, and adoption sustainment.  Each of these are crucial to EHR adoption, but are much longer journeys than the initial implementation steps.

The journey of adoption is challenging, messy and dynamic and we may never actually arrive at “EHR Adoption.”   EHR adoption has a lifecycle that’s influenced by many factors including staff turnover and software upgrades.  So every organization must be prepared for ongoing education, training and engagement with their end-users to keep the EHR journey moving forward.

When considering this challenge, Dr. Haugen asked the question: Can data help us? And then she offered the following suggestions on how data can help an organization.

  • Data saves time and resources by focusing on the right patients
  • Data incents actions
  • Data removes subjectivity

As Dr. Haugen said, “Measurement has impact.”  She then offered five key measurement areas where healthcare leaders can evaluate their EHR project.  Have users:

  • Understood how the application impacts their job?
  • Understood why the application was implemented?
  • Felt that the leadership team is committed to the success of the project?
  • Felt that the organization’s leadership helped them understand what they need to do to adopt the new system?
  • Felt that communication from the leadership team helped make them feel more comfortable about the change?

Each of the above measurements is really focused on making sure an organization has user buy in for the EHR journey.  After you get past the EHR implementation stage, Dr. Haugen offered a series of other important questions you should understand and measure in order to optimize your EHR:

  • How is the application being used?
  • How are upgrades being adopted?
  • How do we overcome workarounds?
  • Who is struggling to use the new system?
  • What areas of the application are confusing and could lead to clinical errors?
  • How can we gain increased productivity?
  • Inefficient workflows – what are they and how do we change them?

Each of these questions and measurements can help an organization realize where end users could use more or better EHR education.  Dr. Haugen suggested that the best way to close any learning gaps is to offer scenario-based learning that helps end users become more knowledgeable and confident in their work.

Dr. Haugen also offered a number of other early findings from their research on the EHR journey.  First, only a small percentage of users need one on one help.  Second, software upgrades erode adoption over time and so with every upgrade you need a commensurate effort to retrain adoption.  Third, optimization is the responsibility of clinical leaders.  Fourth, users want education delivered at the time of need.  Fifth, data still lives on paper.  Sixth, there is a lot of opportunity to improve productivity through more efficient workflows.

Dr. Haugen concluded that “Feet on the street are probably not going to be how we solve the optimization challenges.  The right data could help us solve the optimization challenges.”  The right data with fast, effective and sustainable training will take us a long way on the EHR journey to a secure, standardized, and shared medical record.

You can see Heather Haugen, PhD’s full presentation at the Healthcare Forum (embedded below):

The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, sponsored this coverage of the Healthcare Forum in order to share the messages from the forum with a wider audience.  You can view all of the Healthcare Forum videos on The Healthcare Forum website.

Stanford Uses Epic Feature To Conduct Web Visits

Posted on September 20, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

Stanford Hospital & Clinics has rolled out a new primary care service, powered by a feature available within its Epic EMR, offering medical visits via web video.

The new service allows patients to schedule video visits via the hospital website, using a scheduling application available on the site, InformationWeek reports. At the scheduled time, patient and doctor meet together in a web-based video conference.

The service, which Stanford dubs “eCare,” takes advantage of Epic’s software for video consultations. The video consult is integrated into the patient’s Epic medical record automatically. eCare also integrates third–party identity verification services in an effort to make sure the patient is who they say they are.

According to Stanford CIO Pravene Nath, M.D., who spoke with InformationWeek, video visits are medically appropriate for a range of noncritical visits and follow-ups. For example, one of the service’s first patients had an eye condition; the doctor was able to help simply by looking into the camera at the patient’s eyes. Another example of condition appropriate for web conferencing is treatment of a skin rash, Nath said.

“These are cases where a quick visual is all that is needed, followed by a quick interaction of the patient talking with the doctor,” Nath told InformationWeek.

Stanford is offering eCare first to employees of self insured firms who contract with the hospital. That way, neither the employer nor Stanford has to worry about whether a managed-care company will reimburse the doctors for the video visits. But Stanford’s intent is to make video consults available to everyone, InformationWeek says.

Stanford’s care program is just one of several virtual healthcare services the hospital’s developing, IW reports. The organization is also looking into secure messaging between doctors and patients and a service which involves submitting a still photo of them conducting a live videoconference, the magazine says.

If Stanford can make the integrated EMR and web visits work, it may be breaking new ground. A few months ago, I wrote a piece noting that many telemedicine providers are very reluctant to integrate with EMRs, given that the need for interoperability with so many systems could choke their development efforts.

While enabling telemedicine isn’t going to offer Epic any huge advantage it doesn’t have already, it does offer some intriguing possibilities. If thought leaders like Stanford make a success of web visits, using Epic technology, it might force other competitors into the telemedicine arena as well. It will be interesting to see how influential Stanford’s experiment turns out to be.

Most US Hospitals Are Ready For Meaningful Use Stage 2

Posted on September 19, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is veteran healthcare editor and analyst with 25 years of industry experience. Zieger formerly served as editor-in-chief of FierceHealthcare.com and her commentaries have appeared in dozens of international business publications, including Forbes, Business Week and Information Week. She has also contributed content to hundreds of healthcare and health IT organizations, including several Fortune 500 companies. She can be reached at @ziegerhealth or www.ziegerhealthcare.com.

So, it looks like most US hospitals are prepared for Meaningful Use Stage 2. New data from HIMSS suggests that approximately 68 percent of US hospitals have purchased technology from a software vendor that has been certified to the 2014 Edition certification criteria, according to Healthcare IT News.

The HIMSS report, Hospital Readiness to Meet Meaningful Use Stage 2, was released this week during National Health IT Week in Washington, D.C.

Researchers found that at least 60 percent of hospitals in their sample had met requirements for at least nine of the core metrics that define Stage 2 Meaningful Use. They also found that roughly 70 percent of respondents are actively moving toward meeting stage two meaningful use requirements across all metrics, Healthcare IT News reports.

These latest findings from HIMSS fit well with other data from previous reports done by the organization. The 24th Annual HIMSS Leadership Survey, which was released this February, found that 75 percent of respondents expected their organization to qualify for Stage 2 incentives in 2014.

Things aren’t nearly so rosy, however, when it comes to Stage 2 compliance for physicians. Several trade groups have written to HHS asking the agency to postpone or even put on hold the requirements of Stage 2.  In August, for example, the MGMA wrote a letter to HHS asking the agency to put Stage 2 requirements on an indefinite moratorium for practices that have successfully nailed Stage 1 Meaningful Use requirements.

The MGMA argues that it’s unfair to expect medical practices to comply with Stage 2 Meaningful Use as of yet, given that at present there are only 75 products and 21 complete EMRs for ambulatory care which are currently certified for Stage 2 criteria. As I see it, they have an excellent point.

This is an untenable situation. It’s all well and good that hospitals are approaching Stage 2 readiness, but if ambulatory care is being left behind, Meaningful Use Stage 2 can’t be said to be accomplishing its true purpose. I believe HHS will grant the request of MGMA and other groups like it – and ease Stage 2 deadlines for ambulatory care providers – or it risks creating a digital divide between hospitals and medical practices which does no one any good.

Judy Faulkner Interoperability Chart

Posted on September 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Farzad Mostashari shared the following tweet which includes a picture of the growth in standards-based exchange per Judy Faulkner.

Here’s a blown up version of the chart (click on the image for an even larger version):
Epic Data Sharing Chart

As Farzad notes in the tweet, the patient records exchanged per month is now up to 1.25 million. It’s also worth noting that the red bar in the chart is exchange of records from Epic to Epic. The Green bar in the charts is from Epic to Non-Epic. I hope that green bar continues to grow since as the chart displays, that’s a definite shift in strategy for Epic. Let’s hope this shift continues until the data in healthcare is available where it’s needed when it’s needed.