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How Do You Change the HIPAA Culture of Your Hospital?

Posted on October 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Over on EMR and HIPAA, I wrote an article about the “Just Enough” culture of HIPAA compliance. I’m sure that many of you reading this post will be very familiar with this culture. Unfortunately, it’s rampant in so many hospitals across the nation. Even when a few people in the organization are hyper focused on doing more about HIPAA compliance, they’re often stifled by others who want to do just enough.

In response to this post, Christopher Gebhardt, offered these suggestions on when a hospital’s culture has a “funny” way of changing:
– Through the genuine interest of senior executives leading the charge.
– After being slapped with a violation.
– When OCR shows up at your door. The latter defeats the “it can’t happen here” mentality.
– When OCR takes action, repeatedly, for known violations against your competitors.

I think you could define Christopher’s description as a reactionary approach to HIPAA compliance. I think it’s fair to say that along with being a “just enough” culture of HIPAA compliance, healthcare is also very reactionary. There are some notable exceptions to this, but HIPAA and security compliance are very reactionary in most hospitals.

Culture is a hard thing to change at any organization. However, I think we’re entering a new era where a culture of security and compliance is going to be very important to every healthcare organization. With social media, there’s no where to hide any more. An investment in the right hospital security and privacy culture will likely pay off greatly in the long term.

Hospitals and Ebola

Posted on October 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

It seems like you can’t turn your head anywhere without hearing something about Ebola these days. I heard one TV station in Dallas being called the Ebola news. It’s probably pretty accurate considering it’s been the epicenter of the news coverage. Although, the coverage has seemed to be a little all over the place. In fact, the coverage for Ebola has hit so many places, that I’ve basically avoided almost all of the coverage. I’ve only gotten a little bit of coverage from the sources that I ready regularly. I guess I’ve also seen a few headlines on social media.

With that said, I have dug a little deeper on what’s happened with the EHR and Ebola discussions. Although, that story seems to be even more convoluted and misunderstood than the larger Ebola story. If you want something really valuable (notice the sarcasm font), check out this just released joint statement from the AMA, AHA, and ANA that basically says “We’re working together on it.” If I were a member of any of these organizations, I’d have to consider quitting.

Here’s my short synopsis on what we should know about Ebola:

1. Be thoughtful in how you avoid any communicable disease (Ebola included). That doesn’t mean you have to lock yourself in your house and never go out.
2. We need to get Ebola under control in Africa. If we don’t, then we could have Ebola become a real issue in the US.
3. EHR software can help healthcare professionals identify and track Ebola if configured properly.

There are a number of groups and organizations trying to come together to spread the EHR best practices when it comes to Ebola. I’ll be interested to hear what they find.

Those are my general thoughts on what’s happening. As I said, I’m not an all encompassing expert on the topic. Let’s all share what we know and what we’re doing in the comments.

The Changing Health IT Consulting Job Market

Posted on October 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Cassie Sturdevant has a great post up on Healthcare IT Today titled “The New Health IT Consulting Skill Set.” In the post, she talks about the changing Health IT market for consultants. She’s absolutely right that between 2010-2012 it was a white hot market and that the market has since cooled down. As she mentions, that means that clients can be much more selective in who their hire. Then, she outlines a few ways to differentiate yourself as a consultant:

  1. Operations or Clinical Background
  2. Communication Skills
  3. Multi-Faceted Knowledge

Those are some good suggestions and if you read the full article, you can find more details from Cassie on each suggestion. If I were to summarize Cassie’s suggestions, it would be that healthcare organizations will need someone with a much deeper knowledge of EHR and Healthcare IT than they had to have previously.

As I look at the healthcare consulting market going forward, I see two major areas of opportunities: EHR switching and EHR optimization.

EHR Switching – Since the majority of hospitals have now implemented some form of EHR, the new EHR implementation market is drying up. However, that’s not to say that we won’t see a lot of new EHR purchases. These new EHR Purchases will instead be hospitals that are buying a new EHR. This EHR switching takes a lot of effort and skills to do it properly. Plus, it takes an organization that has a deep understanding of both the legacy and new EHR software. Watch for the EHR switching to really spike post-meaningful use.

EHR Optimization – This is a really broad area of work. However, so many of the EHR implementations were done on shortened timelines that almost no EHR optimization occurred during the implementation. This presents a major opportunity. Every organization is going to be looking for ways that they can extract more value out of their EHR investment. Consultants that have deep knowledge about how to get this value will be in high demand.

It’s still an exciting time to be in healthcare IT with lots of opportunities. It’s not the gold rush that it was, but there is still plenty of opportunity to do amazing things with an organization’s healthcare IT.

If you’re looking for a healthcare IT job, be sure to check out these Health IT company job postings:

If your organization is looking for some healthcare IT talent, check out our Healthcare IT central career website.

Is Healthcare So Distracted by the Trees That We Can’t See the Forest?

Posted on October 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I was listening to a healthcare IT professional talk recently about the challenges they face in the trenches. In a somewhat exasperated way they said more or less that “We have to be careful that we don’t get so distracted by the trees that we can’t see what’s happening with the forest.

What an amazing insight! As a healthcare IT professional, it’s really easy to get bogged down in the operational day to day requirements. Whether you’re dealing with meaningful use requirements, prepping for ICD-10, upgrading your EHR software, managing your patient portal, updating your CDS rules, or any of the myriad of regular IT support like desktop replacements, network upgrades, firewall management, etc etc etc, it’s easy to get bogged down in this more operationally focused work. How many healthcare IT professionals keep an eye on what’s happening with healthcare in general?

Unfortunately, I think far too many of them are completely overwhelmed with operations. Most of them don’t realize the movement towards a more engaged patient. A lot of them don’t know about the shifting reimbursement towards a new value based reimbursement model. Most are up to date on the ICD-10 delays, but few understand if the ICD-10 delays are a good or a bad thing for healthcare.

In some ways, that’s not a terrible thing. There’s a real power in being focused on the project at hand and executing it at the highest level possible. Especially if you have a great leadership organization that’s keeping a keen eye on macro healthcare trends that need to be considered by your hospital.

However, even the very best leaders can learn and benefit from a highly involved workforce that understands not only the immediate operational needs of the organization, but that also have a broader understanding of why certain projects matter to an organization in the bigger picture. There’s nothing more challenging to a leader than to push forward a project which isn’t understood as being important by their staff.

Like in most things in life, it takes balance. Finding that balance in your organization can provide some amazing results.

Investor Wants to Take Down Epic

Posted on October 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

I recently came across a really interesting comment from Chamath Palihapitiya, a venture capitalist (made his money working at Facebook), who commented on the healthcare industry and how he wanted to invest in a startup company that would take down Facebook. I embedded the full video below. His comments about EHR and Epic start at about 52:38 or you can click here to see it.

Here’s a great quote for those who can’t watch the video:

“Somebody has to go after the electronic medical record market in a really big way. Let’s go and take down this company call Epic which is this massive, old conglomerate. It’s like the IBM of healthcare.”

After saying this, he talks about how he and other VC investors like John Doerr could call people from Obama (for meaningful use stage 3) to Mayo Clinic to help a startup company try and take down Epic. He even asserts that he’d call Mayo Clinic and suggest that they should rip out Epic and go with this startup company.

Everyone reading this blog know that it won’t be nearly this simple to convince any hospital that’s on Epic to leave it behind. I agree with Chamath that it will happen at some point, but it won’t be nearly as easy as what he describes. Chamath also suggested that it might take $100 million and you might fail, but what a way to fail.

It certainly provides an interesting view into the way these venture capitalists and many startup companies approach a problem. However, I take a more nuance and practical approach of how I think that Epic will be disrupted. I think that it will require a mix of a new technology paired with a dynamic CIO that’s friends with the hospital IT leadership. You need that mix of amazing technology with insider credibility or it won’t be a success. Plus, you’re not going to go straight in and take out Epic. You’re going to start with a hospital department and create something amazing. Then, that will make the rest of the hospital jealous and you’ll expand from there until you can replace Epic. That’s how I see it playing out, but it likely won’t happen until after the MU dollars are spent.

Chamath’s comments were also interesting, because it shows that he doesn’t know the healthcare market very well. First, he said that meaningful use was part of ACA, but meaningful use is part of ARRA (the HITECH Act) and not ACA. This is a common error by many and doesn’t really impact the points he made. Second, he said that Epic is a big conglomerate. Epic is the farthest thing from a conglomerate that you can find. Has Epic ever acquired any company or technology? Cerner, McKesson, GE, etc could be called conglomerates, but Epic is not. Again, a subtle thing, but shows Chamath’s depth of understanding in the industry. It makes sense though. He isn’t an expert in healthcare IT. He’s an expert in seeing market opportunities. No doubt, disrupting Epic and Cerner would make for a massive company.

Video Interview with John Halamka, CIO at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Posted on October 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Today, I happened upon a really laid back interview by CXOTalk with John Halamka, CIO at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a bunch of other things (see the list at the bottom of this post). John Halamka has been doing this for a long time (20 years at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) and so he has some interesting perspectives. Plus, he’s put himself out there all over the place including participation in the meaningful use committees.

Here are some great lines from the interview:
“There’s no problem that can’t be blamed on IT.”

“You should never go live based on a deadline. You go live when the product is ready or the people are ready to use the product.”

“If you go live too early, no one will ever forget. If you go live too late, no one will ever remember.”

Check out the full video for other interesting insights into healthcare IT and John Halamka:

John D. Halamka, MD, MS is Chief Information Officer of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Chief Information Officer and Dean for Technology at Harvard Medical School, Chairman of the New England Health Electronic Data Interchange Network (NEHEN), CEO of MA-SHARE (the Regional Health Information Organization), Chair of the US Healthcare Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP), and a practicing Emergency Physician.

If Restaurants Were Run Like Hospitals

Posted on October 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Health Catalyst has created this really awesome video that shows how a restaurant experience would be if it were run like hospitals. I’d say this is funny, but it cuts a little close to home. Either way, it’s insightful.

More Epic Interoperability Discussion

Posted on October 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

Looks like Epic is starting to open up and join the conversation about healthcare interoperability. The latest is an article in the New York Times which includes a few comments from Judy Faulkner, CEO of Epic. Here’s the main comments from Judy:

In 2005, when it became clear to her [Judy] that the government was not prepared to create a set of rules around interoperability, Ms. Faulkner said, her team began writing the code for Care Everywhere. Initially seen as a health information exchange for its own customers, Care Everywhere today connects hospitals all over the country as well as to various public health agencies and registries.

“Let’s say a patient is coming from U.C.L.A. and going to the University of Chicago, an Epic-to-Epic hospital. Boom. That’s easy,” Ms. Faulkner said. “These are hospitals that have agreed to the Rules of the Road, a legal contract, that says the other organization is going to take good care of the data.”

This is a really interesting approach. Blame the government for not applying a standard. Talk about how you’ve had to do it yourself and that’s why you built Care Everywhere. I wish that Judy would come out with the heart of the matter. Epic’s customers never asked for it and so they never did it. I believe that’s the simple reality. Remember that interoperability might be a big negative for many healthcare systems. If they’re interoperable, that could be a hit to revenue. Hopefully ACOs and other value based reimbursement will change this.

The key to coming clean like this though, is to come out with a deep set of initiatives that show that while it wasn’t something you worked on in the past, you’re going all in on interoperability now. We’re a very forgiving people, and if Epic (or any other large EHR vendor for that matter) came out with a plan to be interoperable, many would jump on board and forgive them for past transgressions (wherever the blame may lie).

Unfortunately, we don’t yet see this. I’d love to catch up with Judy Faulkner at CHIME and talk to her about it. The key will be to have a full spectrum interoperability plan and not just Care Everywhere that doesn’t work everywhere. Remember that Epic has charts for about 50% of the US patient population, but that’s still only 50%. Plus, of the 50% of patients they do have, a very very small percentage of them are all stored in the same Epic system. My guess would be that 99+% of patients who have a record in Epic have their medical records in other places as well. This means that Epic will need data from other non-Epic systems.

As I’ve said before, Epic wouldn’t need to wait for the government to do this. They are more than large enough to set the standard for the industry. In fact, doing so puts them in a real position of power. Plus, it’s the right thing to do for the US healthcare system.

Will the interoperability be perefect? No. It will take years and years to get everything right, but that’s ok. Progress will be better than what we have now. I love this quote from the NY Times article linked above:

“We’ve spent half a million dollars on an electronic health record system about three years ago, and I’m faxing all day long. I can’t send anything electronically over it,” said Dr. William L. Rich III, a member of a nine-person ophthalmology practice in Northern Virginia and medical director of health policy for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

I hope that Epic continues down the path to interoperability and becomes even more aggressive. I think the climate’s right for them to make it happen. They’re in a really unique position to be able to really change the way we think and talk about interoperability. I’m interested to see if they seize the opportunity or just talk about it.

Of course, we’ve focused this article talking about Epic. That’s what happens when you’re the A list celebrity on the red carpet. People want to talk about you. The NY Times article pretty aptly points out that the other EHR vendors aren’t much more or less interoperable than Epic. Feel free to replace Epic with another large EHR vendor’s name and the story will likely read the same.

My hope is that EHR vendors won’t wait for customers to demand interoperability, but will instead make interoperability so easy that their customers will love taking part. Watch for a future series of posts on Healthcare Intoperability and why this is much easier said than done.

What Can We Expect with Meaningful Use Stage 3?

Posted on October 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

The incomparable John Halamka, CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Co-Chair of the HIT Standards Committee, has a good post up on his blog talking about the future of standards, certification and meaningful use stage 3. Here’s one excerpt about MU stage 3 and EHR certificaiton:

Meaningful Use Stage 3 regulations are currently in draft and will be released as NPRM before the end of the year. My hope for these regulations is that they will be less prescriptive than previous stages, reducing the burden of implementation for providers and vendors.

It’s purely my opinion, but I’m optimistic that simplification will happen, given that the 2015 Certification Rule is likely to decouple Meaningful Use and certification. Certification is likely to be incremental year to year without the tidal wave of requirements we’ve seen in the past. Certification of health IT (not just EHRs) will be with us for a long time and may be leveraged by more programs than just the EHR incentive programs. Imagine that modules for patient generated data (such as wearables), health information exchange (HISPs), and analytics services (such as those used for care management by ACOs) could be certified and used in any combination to achieve outcomes.

I’m really hopeful that Halamka is right and that MU stage 3 will be dramatically simpler. However, in government work, I’m rarely confident that something will be simple. In fact, his comments about ongoing certification are sad too. Anyone who’s had to work with supposedly certified CCD documents from multiple EHR vendors that should be “standard” knows what I mean. Because of examples like this, I’m not a fan of government certification setting the standard, but Halamka might be right that they may use EHR certification to try.

What will be interesting to me is what motivation organizations will have to continue on with meaningful use stage 3. The EHR incentive money will be gone. Certainly the EHR penalties are a pretty sizable motivation for many organizations. Although, probably not as sizable as many think when you compare it against even the MU 2 burden (another reason why MU 3 needs to be simpler). Also, I still wouldn’t be surprised if we had an ICD-10 Delay-esque move by the AMA or some other healthcare organization to remove the EHR penalties. It will be a little harder since the penalties are hard revenue that has to be accounted for, but don’t put it past a good lobbyist.

What’s Happening with All the Departures at ONC?

Posted on October 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit.

In many ways, it’s expected that there will be a fair amount of change in the leadership of an organization when the leader leaves. The new leader often wants to bring in their people with whom they’ve worked with before and trust. Plus, I’ve previously noted that the Golden Age of EHR is over and so it’s not surprising that many people would leave ONC as the MU money is running out and the future of ONC is uncertain.

You’ll see the letter below that Karen DeSalvo just sent out about the latest ONC departure: Judy Murphy, Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) at ONC. This is the fourth high level leader that’s left ONC in the past few months. For those keeping track at home, Doug Fridsma MD, ONC’s Chief Science Officer, Joy Pritts, the first Chief Privacy Officer at ONC, and Lygeia Ricciardi, Director of the Office of Consumer eHealth, are the other 3 that have left ONC.

When Karen DeSalvo announced the ONC reorganization, here’s the leadership team she outlined:
Office of Care Transformation: Kelly Cronin
Office of the Chief Privacy Officer: Joy Pritts
Office of the Chief Operating Officer: Lisa Lewis
Office of the Chief Scientist: Doug Fridsma, MD, PhD
Office of Clinical Quality and Safety: Judy Murphy, RN
Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Analysis: Seth Pazinski
Office of Policy: Jodi Daniel
Office of Programs: Kim Lynch
Office of Public Affairs and Communications: Nora Super
Office of Standards and Technology: Steve Posnack

Three of the people on this list have already left ONC. That’s a pretty big hit to an organization that will likely have to do some hard work to ensure they’re included in future budgets in a post-MU era. It’s hard to fault any of these people who have an opportunity to make a lot more money working in industry. It will be fun to see who steps in to replace all these departures (including Dr. Jon White and Dr. Andy Gettinger who DeSalvo talks about in her letter below).

Must be an interesting time in the hallways of ONC.

Letter from Karen DeSalvo to ONC team about the departure of Judy Murphy, CNO of ONC:

ONC Team:

I am writing to let you know that Judy Murphy, our Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) and Director of the Office of Clinical Quality and Safety (OCQS), will be leaving ONC to take on an exciting new position as Chief Nursing Officer with IBM Healthcare Global Business Services. Her last day will be October 17.

Judy came to ONC in December 2011 and continued her established tradition of giving passionately and tirelessly to the entire health IT community. As Deputy National Coordinator for Programs and Policy, she led the HITECH funded program offices to achieve key milestones, such as the RECs providing assistance to 150,000 providers and helping 100,000 of them meet the meaningful use incentive requirements (exceeding the goal by 150%). She ensured that dedicated resources were available to help 1,300 critical access and rural hospitals exceed the same goals by 200%. She helped grow the MUVer (Meaningful Use Vanguard) Program to 1,000 providers and the Health IT Fellows Program to 45, giving us real boots on the ground to help providers adopt and use EHRs.

Her long-standing reputation of patient advocacy and maintaining a “patient-centric” point of view helped in ONC’s creation of the Office of Consumer eHealth, as well as identify annual strategic goals to promote consumer engagement. With the office, she helped launch the now very successful “Blue Button: Download your Health Data” campaign initiative.

Most recently, as CNO, she championed a Nursing Engagement Strategy for ONC and initiated the joint ONC and American Nurses Association Health IT for Nurses Summit which was attended by 200 RNs and NPs. In addition, her astute organizational and project management skills were put to use strengthening portfolio management and project performance management at ONC.

In her time here, she received several awards spotlighting her work, including the HIMSS Federal Health IT Leadership Award, the AMIA President’s Leadership Award, and the Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award from her alma mater, Alverno College, in Wisconsin.

We are planning a smooth transition of Judy’s current duties. Judy’s CNO responsibilities will be entrusted to the other nurses at ONC until a replacement CNO can be named.

Dr. Jon White will be on a part-time detail to ONC from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to serve as interim lead of OCQS and serve as ONC’s Acting Chief Medical Officer, reporting to Deputy National Coordinator Jacob Reider, while ONC searches for permanent staff to fill these positions. Dr. White directs AHRQ’s Health IT portfolio and will continue in that role part-time.

Dr. Andy Gettinger, from Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, has agreed to lead the OCQS Safety team and the patient safety work. Dr. Gettinger comes to us with vast experience in many areas of health IT and we are excited to welcome him to the team. Judy is working closely with Jon, Andy, the extraordinary OCQS team, and me to ensure a seamless transition of her responsibilities.

Please join me in wishing Judy all the best in her new role, thanking her for her public service to our nation, and welcoming Andy and Jon to our team.

kd